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November 2009

The Spirit Awards to Announce Noms Live Tomorrow AM

The Spirit Awards to Announce Noms Live Tomorrow AM

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There is nothing sweeter than the idea of The Hurt Locker winning Best Picture, or its director, Kathryn Bigelow, taking home the big prize. But, and I hate to be the bearer of bad tidings, this was an expected win. Not only that, the Gothams and the Film Independent Spirits are outside indie awards — more indicative of potential nominations than Oscar wins. What this win does do for The…

Streep presents Career Achievement Award to Tucci at Gothams

Streep presents Career Achievement Award to Tucci at Gothams

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Gotham Award Winners

Gotham Award Winners

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via IndieWire: Best Feature The Hurt Locker — Kathryn Bigelow, director; Kathryn Bigelow, Mark Boal, Nicolas Chartier, Greg Shapiro, producers (Summit Entertainment) Best Documentary Food, Inc. — Robert Kenner, director; Robert Kenner, Elise Pearlstein, producers (Magnolia Pictures) Best Ensemble Performance The Hurt Locker — Jeremy Renner, Anthony Mackie, Brian Geraghty, Ralph Fiennes, Guy Pearce, David Morse, Evangeline Lilly Breakthrough Director Robert Siegel for Big Fan Breakthrough Actor Catalina Saavedra in…

Nine, trailer 3

Nine, trailer 3

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Press Conference Reporter, Nine: “Have you run out of things to say?” Press Conference Groupie, 8¬Ω: “He’s lost. He hasn’t got anything to say.” It’ll be fun to see how nimbly Nine pings famous licks, riffs and phrases from 8¬Ω. (thanks to Kay)

Guide to the Precursers

Guide to the Precursers

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Indiewire’s Peter Knegt does a good job laying out the award precursors coming soon to an Oscar blog near you. Actually, you could probably say it will becoming from all sides, from every angle and outlet and social networking tool near you. I’m scared of Oscars 2009 where Twitter and Facebook are involved. There might turn out to be such a thing as too much information. “Did you hear what…

The No-Good,   the Bad, the Ugly, and the Truly Putrid

The No-Good, the Bad, the Ugly, and the Truly Putrid

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by John Villeneuve Every year some painfully half-baked, ill-conceived or inept films get submitted by countries from around the world for consideration in the Best Foreign Film category. However, this year seems to have more than usual. Which begs the question, if you don’t have a respectable film to present, and if it is clear that it will never get nominated, then why submit? Generally, the answer is that somewhere,…

Corliss singles out A Single Man

Corliss singles out A Single Man

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In the same TIME feature Sasha quotes below (and I now see was the platform for The Lovely Bones preview a few days ago), Richard Corliss has high praise for Colin Firth in A Single Man, and for first-time director Tom Ford: For close to three decades, Colin Firth has been a reliable, gently seductive leading man… But he never got that Role of a Lifetime that actors pray for…

Contender 2010: Greenberg

Contender 2010: Greenberg

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Like Jason Reitman, Noah Baumbach has mastered the near-impossible knack of writing smart, memorable, quotable dialogue that doesn’t sound like a stand-up routine in search of a rim-shot. I suppose George Hickenlooper would mock a movie like this as a “puerile masturbatory self examination of stone dead emotional detachment and characters who no longer mirror real life.” But I’d rather enjoy a casual wank with characters like this than dry…

Martin Sheen on Hal Holbrook

Martin Sheen on Hal Holbrook

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I’ll bounce off Sasha’s angle once more to feature a second Variety tribute from one actor to another: I had the privilege of playing Hal Holbrook’s gay lover in the landmark TV film “That Certain Summer.” His character was a divorced father with a teenage son, and in one powerful climactic scene, the boy rejects him when he discovers he’s gay. Hal sat down and simply wept uncontrollably in the…

Invictus and Bones’ Reviews Coming Through

Invictus and Bones’ Reviews Coming Through

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Richard Corliss, in a Fall Movie Preview, writes up Invictus admiringly: If there’s a whiff of colonialism in casting Hollywood stars as renowned South Africans, the actors work hard to find strength and nuance in their roles. Damon, beefed up for the occasion, makes Pienaar a stalwart yet courtly figure. Freeman infuses Mandela’s speeches with the same gentleness and gravity he’s brought to his numerous God roles and the Visa…