Cameron Crowe Marries Rock and Film in Top Ten List

No filmmaker besides Martin Scorsese, probably, uses music so well as Cameron Crowe does throughout his career.  That’s probably why Almost Famous rang so true when it opened and rings true today.  It wasn’t only a film about criticism, journalism and coming-of-age, it was a film about rock and roll.  Now he’s taken his love of both music and film and put together a list. He tries to stay at ten but can’t help it and goes to twenty.

I’m going to add a few of mine (some already tweeted) after his.  He starts by saying “The first thing to remember about any top ten list is that it is not to be trusted. A top ten list is almost invariably subject to the whims of the day. You could be feeling sentimental or melancholy, and suddenly your top ten is a weepy diary of your feelings on the unfortunate day you made the list.”

Counting backwards, the first few:

10. “Where Is My Mind” (The Pixies)
Fight Club (1999)
Some say the lyrics of a song should never comment on the scene. This is not one of those times. The world crumbles, and of course, David Fincher knows the precise song to turn out the lights to.

9. “Cucurrucucu Paloma” (Tomas Mendez)
Talk To Her (2002)
The song is actually a favorite of the director and his friends. It was not uncommon to hear them break out singing this song in public, at get-togethers and restaurants. Almodovar wrote “Cucurrucucu Palmona” into the movie, and it fits the great Talk To Her like a favorite scarf. Marco, the troubled journalist, is in emotional flux, in love with a famous woman bullfighter. He hears the song performed live in a nightclub. The version is immaculate, and the words and song plays largely on the listeners faces. Finally Marco is overcome, and must go for a walk. The bullfighter follows. Their only dialogue: “The song gave me goosebumps.”

8. “Edge Of Reality” (Elvis Presley)
Live A Little, Love A Little (1968)
Many credit the Colonel for steering Elvis into his (arguably-cheesy) 60′s movie period. Actually it was Norman Taurog who defined and perfected the so-called Elvis Movie that became the King’s bread-and-butter after the more authentic Lovin’ You-Jailhouse Rock-King Creole phase. Taurog ended all that with G.I. Blues and went on to shoot eight more Elvis kissing-dancing-loving classics. The rootsy early E was never to be seen again on the big screen, but in its place was a riveting run of films that showed Elvis literally walking through movies at a pace of three a year. Every once in a while, true genius would come shooting through. Elvis’ weariness and unpreparedness sometimes created seismically funny and unintentionally profound sequences like this one. Turn it up and groove out to E’s only true foray into psychedelia. It’s no “She Said She Said” but it’s appropriately trippy and you can’t quite believe it exists.

The rest.

Of course, I had to start with Cameron Crowe’s own musical references and how those beloved songs refer back and weave through the film so well.

I’m cheating all over the place. Not making a list. Not sticking to one song.

Say Anything – In Your Eyes by Peter Gabriel, maybe the most famous scene ever, maybe the best ever use of a rock song with a movie.
Jerry Maguire
– Secret Garden by Bruce Springsteen threads throughout the film but eventually had deep meaning. Free-falling by Tom Petty is also a pivotal song, meaningful to what’s happening internally.
Almost Famous – Tiny Dancer, used to fuse the band together when they fall apart. Ma Cherie Amour, the great OD scene when Patrick Fugit realizes he is love with Kate Hudson.
Fast Times at Ridgemont High — I love the way Led Zeppelin’s Kashmir is used in the film.

High Fidelity – Most of the Time by Bob Dylan used to show how John Cusack is mourning his girlfriend.
Gimme Shelter, used so well by Martin Scorsese in The Departed
Mrs. Robinson by Simon Garfunkle in The Graduate
This Magic Moment that Lou Reed covered in Lost Highway
The Song of the Siren by This Mortal Coil for Lost Highway
And Then He Kissed Me in Goodfellas (for that great long take)
Fight the Power by Public Enemy for Do The Right Thing
Just like Honey by Jesus and the Mary Chain (oops) for the last wonderful minutes of Lost in Translation
Comfortably Numb – Van Morrison and Roger Waters for The Departed
Shipping up to Boston – Dropkick Murphys for The Departed

Since music and movies are pretty much my life I knew my list would be long and unruly. Like Mr. Crowe, I think I’ll start thinking about this and maybe start to harvest a really good one. This is kind of all over the place. But not enough filmmakers are smart enough about music to really use it well. A few of them do – Cameron Crowe hovers right up near the top.

What are yours?

67 Comments on this Post

  1. julian the emperor

    Gimme Shelter is a ubiquitous song by the greatest band on earth. I actually felt that it was a tad bit too obvious to use that song in the opening sequence of The Departed. But then again, the minute you hear it, you know that this movie is Marty back doing a good movie (if not a great one) again.
    You mention the incredible Just Like Honey in Lost In Translation and fail to give the credit to Jesus & Mary Chain! Sasha, shame on you!;) But, yes, that sequence is amazing. It is a perfect match. Tiny Dancer in Almost famous, as well. I cried my heart out when I saw that for the first time. It was just so incredibly poignant!
    Also you nailed the use of Public Enemy in Do The Right Thing! An obvious, but no less inspired, choice for that film.

    I would add (for opening sequences only, in order to restrain myself!): “Killing Moon” by Echo & The Bunnymen in Donnie Darko (sets the tone of the protagonist’s mindset perfectly), “Lust For Life” by Iggy Pop in Trainspotting is a, well, VERY appropriate way to kick off that film, Jockey Full Of Bourbon by Tom Waits in Down By Law is a GREAT sequence and a personal favorite of mine (because of my love for both Cohen and Altman): The use of “The Stranger Song” by Leonard Cohen in the long opening sequence of McCabe and Mrs. Miller.

  2. julian the emperor

    Gimme Shelter is a ubiquitous song by the greatest band on earth. I actually felt that it was a tad bit too obvious to use that song in the opening sequence of The Departed. But then again, the minute you hear it, you know that this movie is Marty back doing a good movie (if not a great one) again.
    You mention the incredible Just Like Honey in Lost In Translation and fail to give the credit to Jesus & Mary Chain! Sasha, shame on you!;) But, yes, that sequence is amazing. It is a perfect match. Tiny Dancer in Almost famous, as well. I cried my heart out when I saw that for the first time. It was just so incredibly poignant!
    Also you nailed the use of Public Enemy in Do The Right Thing! An obvious, but no less inspired, choice for that film.

    I would add (for opening sequences only, in order to restrain myself!): “Killing Moon” by Echo & The Bunnymen in Donnie Darko (sets the tone of the protagonist’s mindset perfectly), “Lust For Life” by Iggy Pop in Trainspotting is a, well, VERY appropriate way to kick off that film, Jockey Full Of Bourbon by Tom Waits in Down By Law is a GREAT sequence and a personal favorite of mine (because of my love for both Cohen and Altman): The use of “The Stranger Song” by Leonard Cohen in the long opening sequence of McCabe and Mrs. Miller.

  3. Nothing beats Wise Up in Magnolia

  4. Nothing beats Wise Up in Magnolia

  5. blizzards14

    “Cucurrucucu Palmona” was first used in Wong Kar Wai’s Happy Together.

  6. blizzards14

    “Cucurrucucu Palmona” was first used in Wong Kar Wai’s Happy Together.

  7. Oh, Sasha, I have to disagree with your opening sentence. Firstly, “music” should be qualified with the rock genre, as that is what you’re discussing here. And, secondly, Crowe is no where in the league of Scorsese when it comes to soundtracks (“so well as”). I would say Crowe is a very DISTANT second at best, with Paul Anderson not far behind him, when it comes to the rock/pop genre.

  8. Oh, Sasha, I have to disagree with your opening sentence. Firstly, “music” should be qualified with the rock genre, as that is what you’re discussing here. And, secondly, Crowe is no where in the league of Scorsese when it comes to soundtracks (“so well as”). I would say Crowe is a very DISTANT second at best, with Paul Anderson not far behind him, when it comes to the rock/pop genre.

  9. La Pantalla

    American Graffiti was a great mix of music and story.

  10. La Pantalla

    American Graffiti was a great mix of music and story.

  11. Live a Little, Love a Little is my favorite Elvis movie. That “Edge of Reality” dream sequence is the bomb. Woohoo!!! But that’s also where you hear “A Little Less Conversation” before those Ocean peeps stole it. Watching Elvis sing to his date with that “bitch please” attitude and his blue-black hair… *swoon*

    This Sunday I went to an ice show and this one kid skated to “Falling Slowly”. I totally stopped seeing him and started picturing Hansard and Irglova instead. I nearly started singing out loud.

    And “Wise Up” really is way up there.

    If I were going to make my own list, I’d be here for days. Weeks even. It’d probably have to have 200 entries. Nearly all of my favorite movies have music that you think of simultaneously when you think of the film itself. Music moments off the top of my head:

    LOTR:FOTR When the Fellowship are all walking single file coming up over a hill and you hear the very beginning of “The Bridge of Khazad-dûm”. (http://open.spotify.com/track/6HYCOHzY2xR4W2dOokH3ed)

    In ROTK when Billy Boyd (Pippen) sings. (http://open.spotify.com/track/227hmntzKpN4CsYt3RVKcC at about the 2:35 mark)

    The entire movie of Flash Gordon but especially the end when he leaves the Hawkmen to find Ming all the way until he gets there *wink*. (http://open.spotify.com/track/6snmvt0Od2exY2APrKXhy4)Go Flash Go!

    In Rocky II, how “Gonna Fly Now” was used, specifically when he brakes away from the kids who are running with him.

    And my all-time favorite like 30 seconds of music+movie is from Star Wars at the end. When they are at the medal ceremony and they march in. They take a dozen steps and then Chewie growls and all the fighters change position and then they walk up and Leia gives them their medals. So awesome. (http://open.spotify.com/track/5JNaxPItD0FlNsmRUBHjBJ specifically starting at 0:18 Chewie growls around 0:30 :) )

  12. Live a Little, Love a Little is my favorite Elvis movie. That “Edge of Reality” dream sequence is the bomb. Woohoo!!! But that’s also where you hear “A Little Less Conversation” before those Ocean peeps stole it. Watching Elvis sing to his date with that “bitch please” attitude and his blue-black hair… *swoon*

    This Sunday I went to an ice show and this one kid skated to “Falling Slowly”. I totally stopped seeing him and started picturing Hansard and Irglova instead. I nearly started singing out loud.

    And “Wise Up” really is way up there.

    If I were going to make my own list, I’d be here for days. Weeks even. It’d probably have to have 200 entries. Nearly all of my favorite movies have music that you think of simultaneously when you think of the film itself. Music moments off the top of my head:

    LOTR:FOTR When the Fellowship are all walking single file coming up over a hill and you hear the very beginning of “The Bridge of Khazad-dûm”. (http://open.spotify.com/track/6HYCOHzY2xR4W2dOokH3ed)

    In ROTK when Billy Boyd (Pippen) sings. (http://open.spotify.com/track/227hmntzKpN4CsYt3RVKcC at about the 2:35 mark)

    The entire movie of Flash Gordon but especially the end when he leaves the Hawkmen to find Ming all the way until he gets there *wink*. (http://open.spotify.com/track/6snmvt0Od2exY2APrKXhy4)Go Flash Go!

    In Rocky II, how “Gonna Fly Now” was used, specifically when he brakes away from the kids who are running with him.

    And my all-time favorite like 30 seconds of music+movie is from Star Wars at the end. When they are at the medal ceremony and they march in. They take a dozen steps and then Chewie growls and all the fighters change position and then they walk up and Leia gives them their medals. So awesome. (http://open.spotify.com/track/5JNaxPItD0FlNsmRUBHjBJ specifically starting at 0:18 Chewie growls around 0:30 :) )

  13. Ahhh, Jesus and Mary Chain. Brilliant band.

    Coppola is good at using music. I loved all the stuff Air did for The Virgin Suicides. In fact, the soundtrack was better than the movie.
    Wong Kar Wai and Quentin Tarantino are another two who have the knack when it comes to using popular songs.

    A few that have stuck in my head…

    Twist and Shout in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
    When a Man Loves a Woman in The Crying Game
    California Dreaming in Chungking Express
    Whiter Shade of Pale in Scorsese’s New York Stories segment
    Stuck In The Middle With You in Reservoir Dogs
    You and Me in Blue Valentine

    … and of course, Bohemian Rhapsody in Wayne’s World.

  14. Ahhh, Jesus and Mary Chain. Brilliant band.

    Coppola is good at using music. I loved all the stuff Air did for The Virgin Suicides. In fact, the soundtrack was better than the movie.
    Wong Kar Wai and Quentin Tarantino are another two who have the knack when it comes to using popular songs.

    A few that have stuck in my head…

    Twist and Shout in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off
    When a Man Loves a Woman in The Crying Game
    California Dreaming in Chungking Express
    Whiter Shade of Pale in Scorsese’s New York Stories segment
    Stuck In The Middle With You in Reservoir Dogs
    You and Me in Blue Valentine

    … and of course, Bohemian Rhapsody in Wayne’s World.

  15. cinesnatch – It’s pretty clear from the title of this post that Sasha is talking about rock music here.

  16. cinesnatch – It’s pretty clear from the title of this post that Sasha is talking about rock music here.

  17. We’ll Meet Again by Vera Lyn at the end of Dr Strangelove

    The Spanish cover of Crying that David Lynch used in Mulholland Drive.

    You and Whose Army in Incendies’ opening scene. Yeah, it felt weird at first to hear Radiohead but it worked.

    oh dear, could be here all day…

  18. We’ll Meet Again by Vera Lyn at the end of Dr Strangelove

    The Spanish cover of Crying that David Lynch used in Mulholland Drive.

    You and Whose Army in Incendies’ opening scene. Yeah, it felt weird at first to hear Radiohead but it worked.

    oh dear, could be here all day…

  19. Tero Heikkinen

    Yeah, this is Tarantino’s strongest game. I would say he’s even better choosing music than writing. Directing is his third talent.

    The beginning of Pulp Fiction is a BANG. “Any of you —- pricks move and I’ll execute every mother—- last one of ya!”

    Similar (and very literally) BANG is this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUMab1GYMIY (from In the Name of the Father).

    I love it when an upbeat track brings in the early credits – almost forcefully.

    Then there’s something like Forrest Gump, where the popular songs plays a big part in the story, shows you the year/month in history.

  20. Tero Heikkinen

    Yeah, this is Tarantino’s strongest game. I would say he’s even better choosing music than writing. Directing is his third talent.

    The beginning of Pulp Fiction is a BANG. “Any of you —- pricks move and I’ll execute every mother—- last one of ya!”

    Similar (and very literally) BANG is this one: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUMab1GYMIY (from In the Name of the Father).

    I love it when an upbeat track brings in the early credits – almost forcefully.

    Then there’s something like Forrest Gump, where the popular songs plays a big part in the story, shows you the year/month in history.

  21. Hong Kong garden at the masquerade ball in Sofia’s Marie Antoinette.
    Love like a sunset part 1 and 2 for both the opening and closing credits of Coppola’s Somewhere.
    Real Hero in the driving sequence and closing credits for DRIVE.

  22. Hong Kong garden at the masquerade ball in Sofia’s Marie Antoinette.
    Love like a sunset part 1 and 2 for both the opening and closing credits of Coppola’s Somewhere.
    Real Hero in the driving sequence and closing credits for DRIVE.

  23. “Crocodile Rock” in Four Weddings and a Funeral also comes to mind. Recently, “The Show” in Moneyball was also very important to the story. Also, big YES to Blue Valentine.

  24. “Crocodile Rock” in Four Weddings and a Funeral also comes to mind. Recently, “The Show” in Moneyball was also very important to the story. Also, big YES to Blue Valentine.

  25. I agree with whoever said that this is Tarantino’s bread and butter. When it comes to putting the right song in a film it is one of the many things he is remarkable at. He is as much a music nerd buff as he is a film nerd buff.

  26. I agree with whoever said that this is Tarantino’s bread and butter. When it comes to putting the right song in a film it is one of the many things he is remarkable at. He is as much a music nerd buff as he is a film nerd buff.

  27. For me, PT Anderson is a master: Aimee Mann’s songs intensified Magnolia, as did his use of songs in Boogie Nights. McCabe and Mrs Miller would not be as effective without L Cohen. And I’m on board with Blue Valentine, as well.

  28. For me, PT Anderson is a master: Aimee Mann’s songs intensified Magnolia, as did his use of songs in Boogie Nights. McCabe and Mrs Miller would not be as effective without L Cohen. And I’m on board with Blue Valentine, as well.

  29. Can’t believe I forgot Coppola Senior. Doh.

    The End by The Doors in Apocalypse Now.

    I’d pick Ride of The Valkyries, but it doesn’t really qualify as a pop song unless you’re a neo Nazi.

  30. Can’t believe I forgot Coppola Senior. Doh.

    The End by The Doors in Apocalypse Now.

    I’d pick Ride of The Valkyries, but it doesn’t really qualify as a pop song unless you’re a neo Nazi.

  31. Rudi Mentär

    “No filmmaker besides Martin Scorsese, probably, uses music so well as Cameron Crowe does throughout his career.” … eam, yes, especially one filmmaker: Quentin Tararantino. ???

  32. Rudi Mentär

    “No filmmaker besides Martin Scorsese, probably, uses music so well as Cameron Crowe does throughout his career.” … eam, yes, especially one filmmaker: Quentin Tararantino. ???

  33. Scott (the other one)

    Gotta echo Steve50 — There is, in my view, no film that better merges the film with the soundtrack than McCabe and Mrs. Miller. From the opening credits on, the music perfectly echoes the woozy, drugged out, unsettling romanticism and nostalgia of Altman’s masterpiece.

    Speaking of Altman, let’s also remember the great soundtrack to Nashivlle, with the stunning final scene where, after the shooting, Barbara Harris finally has her moment in the sun and picks up the microphone to sing It Don’t Worry Me. Beautiful, heartbreaking and deeply disturbing.

  34. Scott (the other one)

    Gotta echo Steve50 — There is, in my view, no film that better merges the film with the soundtrack than McCabe and Mrs. Miller. From the opening credits on, the music perfectly echoes the woozy, drugged out, unsettling romanticism and nostalgia of Altman’s masterpiece.

    Speaking of Altman, let’s also remember the great soundtrack to Nashivlle, with the stunning final scene where, after the shooting, Barbara Harris finally has her moment in the sun and picks up the microphone to sing It Don’t Worry Me. Beautiful, heartbreaking and deeply disturbing.

  35. Stuck In the middle With You – Reservoir Dogs

    And I know it doesn’t quite fit, but to me the most harrowing song ever used in a film is

    HAL singing “Bicycle Built for Two” in 2001 A Space Odyssey

  36. Stuck In the middle With You – Reservoir Dogs

    And I know it doesn’t quite fit, but to me the most harrowing song ever used in a film is

    HAL singing “Bicycle Built for Two” in 2001 A Space Odyssey

  37. Sasha Stone

    Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino, absolutely, top five…

  38. Sasha Stone

    Paul Thomas Anderson and Quentin Tarantino, absolutely, top five…

  39. Back to the Future – Mr. Sandman perfectly sets up the tone of the past.
    Eternal Sunshine – the Beck song (everybody’s gotta hurt sometime? something like that)
    American Graffiti – everything in that movie

  40. Back to the Future – Mr. Sandman perfectly sets up the tone of the past.
    Eternal Sunshine – the Beck song (everybody’s gotta hurt sometime? something like that)
    American Graffiti – everything in that movie

  41. I think Wes Anderson uses music extremely well in his movies; my favorite probably being Needle in the Hay during The Royal Tenenbaums Suicide Scene.

  42. I think Wes Anderson uses music extremely well in his movies; my favorite probably being Needle in the Hay during The Royal Tenenbaums Suicide Scene.

  43. Seankgallagher

    From last year:

    Elle Fanning skating to Gwen Stefani’s “Cool” in SOMEWHERE
    Harry and Hermione dancing to Nick Cave’s “O Children” in DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1
    The would-be terrorists singing along to Toploader’s cover of “Dancing in the Moonlight” in FOUR LIONS
    Carey Mulligan listening to the title song of NEVER LET ME GO

  44. Seankgallagher

    From last year:

    Elle Fanning skating to Gwen Stefani’s “Cool” in SOMEWHERE
    Harry and Hermione dancing to Nick Cave’s “O Children” in DEATHLY HALLOWS PART 1
    The would-be terrorists singing along to Toploader’s cover of “Dancing in the Moonlight” in FOUR LIONS
    Carey Mulligan listening to the title song of NEVER LET ME GO

  45. it’s not rock, but “Singin’ in the Rain” in A CLOCKWORK ORANGE

  46. it’s not rock, but “Singin’ in the Rain” in A CLOCKWORK ORANGE

  47. Yumeji’s Theme in In the Mood for Love.

  48. Yumeji’s Theme in In the Mood for Love.

  49. Surely every single song in Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown deserve a mention. Oh, and Chick Habit at the end of Death Proof is pretty sensational too.

    Meanwhile, I thought the most iconic use of music in Goodfellas was Layla at the end. I can never think of either that film or that song without thinking of the other, which is surely the acid test.

    As for new entries, I don’t know what it’s called, but the moment outside the pizzeria in Drive when that song kicks in is also pretty spectacular. Probably my film moment of 2011.

    The sudden emergence of Beck covering ‘Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime’ in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is also a startlingly good deployment of a song in a movie.

    But my favourite use of a song ever in a film – by quite some miles – is the one that comes at the end of Before Sunset. I won’t say what it is because for anyone who doesn’t know, you really have to discover it for yourself in context and see how it resonates with the outcome of the story. Perfection.

  50. Surely every single song in Pulp Fiction and Jackie Brown deserve a mention. Oh, and Chick Habit at the end of Death Proof is pretty sensational too.

    Meanwhile, I thought the most iconic use of music in Goodfellas was Layla at the end. I can never think of either that film or that song without thinking of the other, which is surely the acid test.

    As for new entries, I don’t know what it’s called, but the moment outside the pizzeria in Drive when that song kicks in is also pretty spectacular. Probably my film moment of 2011.

    The sudden emergence of Beck covering ‘Everybody’s Got To Learn Sometime’ in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is also a startlingly good deployment of a song in a movie.

    But my favourite use of a song ever in a film – by quite some miles – is the one that comes at the end of Before Sunset. I won’t say what it is because for anyone who doesn’t know, you really have to discover it for yourself in context and see how it resonates with the outcome of the story. Perfection.

  51. Oh, and let’s not forget the ingenious song at the end of The Crying Game which – again – to disclose it here would give away too much of the tale.

  52. Oh, and let’s not forget the ingenious song at the end of The Crying Game which – again – to disclose it here would give away too much of the tale.

  53. Andrew Sidhom

    “Satisfy Me” – Once (Marketa’s walk back home after she buys batteries for her cd player)
    “Society” – Into The Wild
    “Easy to Be Hard” – Zodiac (the opening)
    “The Hurdy Gurdy Man” – Zodiac (the ending)
    “O Children” – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II (Harry and Hermione’s dance”

  54. Andrew Sidhom

    “Satisfy Me” – Once (Marketa’s walk back home after she buys batteries for her cd player)
    “Society” – Into The Wild
    “Easy to Be Hard” – Zodiac (the opening)
    “The Hurdy Gurdy Man” – Zodiac (the ending)
    “O Children” – Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II (Harry and Hermione’s dance”

  55. Tero Heikkinen

    JIMBO: “I thought the most iconic use of music in Goodfellas was Layla at the end. I can never think of either that film or that song without thinking of the other, which is surely the acid test.”

    The final instrumental part – in Goodfellas = one of my favourite things ever!

  56. Tero Heikkinen

    JIMBO: “I thought the most iconic use of music in Goodfellas was Layla at the end. I can never think of either that film or that song without thinking of the other, which is surely the acid test.”

    The final instrumental part – in Goodfellas = one of my favourite things ever!

  57. Not the best movie, but Moonlight Mile had really good usage of Music

  58. Not the best movie, but Moonlight Mile had really good usage of Music

  59. Have to agree that QT and PTA are easily some of the frontrunners for this, especially PTA (music plays a HUGE part in both Magnolia and Boogie Nights).

    Love all the other ones mentioned. A few more that come to mind (not limited to rock):

    1.) Cruise and Kidman’s pre-joint/pre-disaster sex scene in Eyes Wide Shut to “Baby Did a Bad, Bad Thing”
    2.) Bob Dylan’s “Times Are A-Changing” to Watchmen’s opening credits
    3.) All of the Bowie covers in Life Aquatic

  60. Have to agree that QT and PTA are easily some of the frontrunners for this, especially PTA (music plays a HUGE part in both Magnolia and Boogie Nights).

    Love all the other ones mentioned. A few more that come to mind (not limited to rock):

    1.) Cruise and Kidman’s pre-joint/pre-disaster sex scene in Eyes Wide Shut to “Baby Did a Bad, Bad Thing”
    2.) Bob Dylan’s “Times Are A-Changing” to Watchmen’s opening credits
    3.) All of the Bowie covers in Life Aquatic

  61. The Spanish cover of Crying that David Lynch used in Mulholland Drive.

    This so much. I have often just jumped ahead to the Club Silencio. NO HAY BANDA! :)

  62. The Spanish cover of Crying that David Lynch used in Mulholland Drive.

    This so much. I have often just jumped ahead to the Club Silencio. NO HAY BANDA! :)

  63. Oh shoot I didn’t mean to post yet. Whoops.

    I also wanted to mention one movie with many great music moments. But my two faves in Velvet Goldmine are “Baby’s on Fire” and “Gimme Danger”. I wish I had been at that ‘Death to Glitter’ concert so much. I kinda wish I’d seen Stillwater live too. Such a groupie. :P But, imo, Curt Wilde is still Ewan McGregor’s best performance.

  64. Oh shoot I didn’t mean to post yet. Whoops.

    I also wanted to mention one movie with many great music moments. But my two faves in Velvet Goldmine are “Baby’s on Fire” and “Gimme Danger”. I wish I had been at that ‘Death to Glitter’ concert so much. I kinda wish I’d seen Stillwater live too. Such a groupie. :P But, imo, Curt Wilde is still Ewan McGregor’s best performance.

  65. alan of montreal

    The title of the This Mortal Coil song is actually Song to the Siren.

  66. alan of montreal

    The title of the This Mortal Coil song is actually Song to the Siren.

  67. Juan Melencamp

    Check out complete movies totally free

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