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Ides of March gets boost from Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly’s Owen Gleiberman says The Ides of March is George Clooney’s best film yet as director:

Actors who become directors tend to focus on performance at the expense of everything else. Clooney certainly brings out the best in his actors, but his driving trait as a filmmaker is that he knows what plays — he has an uncanny sense of how to uncork a scene and let it bubble and flow.

The movie is a grippingly dark and cynical drama of insider politics, set during the days leading up to an Ohio Democratic presidential primary. Ryan Gosling, proving that he can flirt with sleaze and still make you like him, stars as Stephen Meyers, the idealistic but also shrewdly opportunistic press secretary to Gov. Mike Morris (played by Clooney), a soulful and articulate Obama-in-2008-esque candidate who is promising a new kind of politics.

…Early on, there’s a moment that really makes you take notice: Marisa Tomei, as a New York Times reporter, tells Stephen and the governor’s campaign manager (a brilliantly addled Philip Seymour Hoffman) that there’s no way candidate Morris, with his hope-and-change rhetoric, could turn out to be anything but a disappointment. Hmmmm, we wonder…is this going to be the liberal Clooney’s comment on the disenchantment so many Obama supporters feel about the president they once thought of as a savior? Well, sort of. Except that since The Ides of March is about a single primary fight, the movie, while stuffed with political talk-show gabble, isn’t really about policy. It’s about backstabbing, media manipulation, and what campaign managers do when they’re not hatching plans in the war room.

The Ides of March serves up everything we’ve come to know about the dirty business of how campaigns are really run in this country. That may sound like boilerplate cynicism, but what’s new is that Clooney exposes how in our era the thorny process of politics has become the content, blotting out the meaning of policy the way an eclipse blots out the sun. The movie suggests that that’s what occurred in the Obama administration. But it also says a spirit of venomous aggression has entered our politics, one that (the film implies) Obama would do well to embrace more than he has. The Ides of March isn’t profound, but it sure is provocative. It’s a fable of moral urgency, a savvy lament, and a thriller of ideas that goes like a shot. A–

0 Comments on this Post

  1. Damn is this film getting nommed for the big awards yes or no? is it good or mediocre? It goes up then down again then up -_-

  2. Damn is this film getting nommed for the big awards yes or no? is it good or mediocre? It goes up then down again then up -_-

  3. Tero Heikkinen

    “Looks gooood.”

  4. Tero Heikkinen

    “Looks gooood.”

  5. score on metacritic still isnt amazing. I’m wondering why you picked the single highest review on metacritic for this posting, ryan. “real steel” just just as high a review from entertainment weekly (91 out of 100). and has just about the same score on metacritic.

  6. score on metacritic still isnt amazing. I’m wondering why you picked the single highest review on metacritic for this posting, ryan. “real steel” just just as high a review from entertainment weekly (91 out of 100). and has just about the same score on metacritic.

  7. I’m wondering why you picked the single highest review on metacritic for this posting, ryan.

    gee, drake — do you think we want to gleefully announce the LOWEST rated review? We’re looking for signs of optimism. Not trying to drown movies in the bathtub.

    If you want to see excitement for Real Steel you’re at the wrong movie site.

    You don’t seriously think we should have high hopes for Real Steel, do you? But you want us to just ignore Ides of March because all the reviews aren’t stellar?

  8. I’m wondering why you picked the single highest review on metacritic for this posting, ryan.

    gee, drake — do you think we want to gleefully announce the LOWEST rated review? We’re looking for signs of optimism. Not trying to drown movies in the bathtub.

    If you want to see excitement for Real Steel you’re at the wrong movie site.

    You don’t seriously think we should have high hopes for Real Steel, do you? But you want us to just ignore Ides of March because all the reviews aren’t stellar?

  9. Rufussondheim

    Dave Karger, from Entertainment Weekly, has been consistently up on this film getting nominations, and he might be the best predictor in the game today. Sure, Karger isn’t the person who wrote this review, but nonetheless it is the same publication. EW of promoting the right mix of mass appeal and critical consensus that the Academy loves.

    While it may not be automatically in, it’s definitely on the short list. Depends, as always, on what’s to come. We simply don’t know.

  10. Rufussondheim

    Dave Karger, from Entertainment Weekly, has been consistently up on this film getting nominations, and he might be the best predictor in the game today. Sure, Karger isn’t the person who wrote this review, but nonetheless it is the same publication. EW of promoting the right mix of mass appeal and critical consensus that the Academy loves.

    While it may not be automatically in, it’s definitely on the short list. Depends, as always, on what’s to come. We simply don’t know.

  11. @ ryan

    haha you’re right ryan. I’m all for signs of optimism! Good point. I’d rather go to awardsdaily and see what the critics think so far and i don’t think this is an example of what the critics think so far- not at all. And no i don’t have high hopes for “real steel” and won’t see it unless the reviews are very good (although the reviews are almost identical to “ides of march” to this point and for a site that called “rise of planet of the apes”(i know sasha did this) the best of the year so far i wouldn’t write off “real steal” based on genre or that it takes itself less serious than “ides”) I just wanted to make a comment and point that the review from EW on “ides of march” wasn’t at all an example of the critical consensus that has built so far on the film. There are lots of critics that still haven’t weighed in but it doesn’t look good so far. And no I don’t think you should put the lowest review of “ides of march”- i would rather see you pick something that represents the consensus. I mean its your site you can do what you want but i think its a little misleading to single out either the highest or lowest of any films. What if you posted the single highest review of a bad film the day before it opened and the single lowest review of a good film… i think people would comment. If you did that you could portray that “transformers” is getting good reviews and that “tree of life” is getting bad reviews if you picked up the single highest review of “transformers” and single lowest of “tree of life”

    i’m personally rooting for “ides of march” and hope its great. but we should be alarmed that a film with gosling, clooney, psh and other great actors is getting kinda underwhelming reviews.

    i’m probably reading too much into this one post and you simply relayed a very positive review from a reputable publication (EW). so i’ll shut up right now.

  12. @ ryan

    haha you’re right ryan. I’m all for signs of optimism! Good point. I’d rather go to awardsdaily and see what the critics think so far and i don’t think this is an example of what the critics think so far- not at all. And no i don’t have high hopes for “real steel” and won’t see it unless the reviews are very good (although the reviews are almost identical to “ides of march” to this point and for a site that called “rise of planet of the apes”(i know sasha did this) the best of the year so far i wouldn’t write off “real steal” based on genre or that it takes itself less serious than “ides”) I just wanted to make a comment and point that the review from EW on “ides of march” wasn’t at all an example of the critical consensus that has built so far on the film. There are lots of critics that still haven’t weighed in but it doesn’t look good so far. And no I don’t think you should put the lowest review of “ides of march”- i would rather see you pick something that represents the consensus. I mean its your site you can do what you want but i think its a little misleading to single out either the highest or lowest of any films. What if you posted the single highest review of a bad film the day before it opened and the single lowest review of a good film… i think people would comment. If you did that you could portray that “transformers” is getting good reviews and that “tree of life” is getting bad reviews if you picked up the single highest review of “transformers” and single lowest of “tree of life”

    i’m personally rooting for “ides of march” and hope its great. but we should be alarmed that a film with gosling, clooney, psh and other great actors is getting kinda underwhelming reviews.

    i’m probably reading too much into this one post and you simply relayed a very positive review from a reputable publication (EW). so i’ll shut up right now.

  13. Strangely, last night on Letterman, he had La George on for the WHOOOOLLLE show. Letterman allmost never does this. And he talked mainly about turning 50, about this palazzo in Italy on Lake Como, his work with his Dad in Darfur, and very, very little about this film
    although he did show a clip at the end. A very brief clip. And with all this airtime, Clooney did not ONCE mention the better reviewed(so far) “The Descendants”. NOT. ONE. WORD.

    Strange.

    Seems like George doesn’t want to hype or even mention “The Descendants.” An embarssament of riches for George? Or confusion for the Academy? AND the viewers?

  14. Strangely, last night on Letterman, he had La George on for the WHOOOOLLLE show. Letterman allmost never does this. And he talked mainly about turning 50, about this palazzo in Italy on Lake Como, his work with his Dad in Darfur, and very, very little about this film
    although he did show a clip at the end. A very brief clip. And with all this airtime, Clooney did not ONCE mention the better reviewed(so far) “The Descendants”. NOT. ONE. WORD.

    Strange.

    Seems like George doesn’t want to hype or even mention “The Descendants.” An embarssament of riches for George? Or confusion for the Academy? AND the viewers?

  15. thanks for undertanding, drake.

    I like to be blissfully oblivious to dubious news until it really slaps me down. We always want to hope that movies will meet our expectations, and I’ll cheerlead with no shame right up to the edge of defeat – (and beyond).

    I don’t have a problem with saying Rise of the Planet of the Apes was the best mainstream multiplex movie of the summer thus far. All those extra qualifying words don’t make a very pretty quote (and won’t get you in a TV ad, either.)

    Me, I’ve just pretty much stopped beating up on movies that have failed. No fun for me to mock and sneer at Jennifer’s Body. Plenty of things to be happy about reporting without trying to find reasons to smear movies.

    If I don’t say anything about a movie — if i ignore it — that’s the clue that I don’t think much of it.

    But what we try to do here is filter the scores using our instincts — it’s not all about numbers. The site to go find all the raw numbers is metacritic itself, right? Our job is to take the numbers into consideration — and to sometimes spin those numbers to support our gut feelings.

    The Ides of March is the kind of movie that deserves our respect for its serious and honorable intentions. I’m not saying Real Steel isn’t a good film. But we all know it’s not going to the Oscars. We give more coverage to movies that interest us personally. It’s the only way I know to write about movies with any soul or personality.

  16. thanks for undertanding, drake.

    I like to be blissfully oblivious to dubious news until it really slaps me down. We always want to hope that movies will meet our expectations, and I’ll cheerlead with no shame right up to the edge of defeat – (and beyond).

    I don’t have a problem with saying Rise of the Planet of the Apes was the best mainstream multiplex movie of the summer thus far. All those extra qualifying words don’t make a very pretty quote (and won’t get you in a TV ad, either.)

    Me, I’ve just pretty much stopped beating up on movies that have failed. No fun for me to mock and sneer at Jennifer’s Body. Plenty of things to be happy about reporting without trying to find reasons to smear movies.

    If I don’t say anything about a movie — if i ignore it — that’s the clue that I don’t think much of it.

    But what we try to do here is filter the scores using our instincts — it’s not all about numbers. The site to go find all the raw numbers is metacritic itself, right? Our job is to take the numbers into consideration — and to sometimes spin those numbers to support our gut feelings.

    The Ides of March is the kind of movie that deserves our respect for its serious and honorable intentions. I’m not saying Real Steel isn’t a good film. But we all know it’s not going to the Oscars. We give more coverage to movies that interest us personally. It’s the only way I know to write about movies with any soul or personality.

  17. i would rather see you pick something that represents the consensus.

    But that’s not my goal here. Just take another look at how I phrased the headline. “EW gives a boost to The Ides of March.” That’s my entire reason for being inspired to post anything at all. The fact that it’s scoring a few knockout reviews refutes the first impression we got two days ago.

    Like I say, anybody who wants to see the consensus needs to go to metacritic. You had no trouble discovering that source. What’s the point of us trying to replicate what metacritic already does?

  18. i would rather see you pick something that represents the consensus.

    But that’s not my goal here. Just take another look at how I phrased the headline. “EW gives a boost to The Ides of March.” That’s my entire reason for being inspired to post anything at all. The fact that it’s scoring a few knockout reviews refutes the first impression we got two days ago.

    Like I say, anybody who wants to see the consensus needs to go to metacritic. You had no trouble discovering that source. What’s the point of us trying to replicate what metacritic already does?

  19. worth pointing out that The Help has a metascore average of 62.

    That number is not going to make us give up on it. The Help has qualities that make the ‘consensus’ of critics moot.

  20. worth pointing out that The Help has a metascore average of 62.

    That number is not going to make us give up on it. The Help has qualities that make the ‘consensus’ of critics moot.

  21. Ricky Schweitzer

    I think that everyone needs to calm themselves down a little bit… It’s only a game remember?

    With that in mind, I do find it more interesting when, on the site, a good review is coupled with a less good review. I don’t believe it shows any bias to put up a good review alone. Frankly, I don’t believe that Sasha, Ryan, and the rest could even pretend to be unbiased with the way they write about certain films, (even though I happen to agree with you all most of the time), but a balance of reviews is more fun to read. Again, I think, given the headline that you gave the article, there is nothing wrong with posting the EW review alone, but perhaps more of the good/bad would make people happier? That is of course unless there’s just no bad word to read, as was essentially the case with films like The Social Network and Toy Story 3.

    In particular, I’d really like to see more of the good/bad pairings in regards to the festival films which many of us have not seen yet. I still don’t have a clear picture of what people thought of films like Carnage and A Dangerous Method. It seemed like some people were saying they were very well received and then others said they flopped… so I was left confused.

    In any case, I’ve been coming to awardsdaily/oscarwatch for years due to the quality of writing, etc. and don’t plan on leaving now. I just think that there are ways of giving a clearer picture of what’s being said for those of us not on the festival circuit.

  22. Ricky Schweitzer

    I think that everyone needs to calm themselves down a little bit… It’s only a game remember?

    With that in mind, I do find it more interesting when, on the site, a good review is coupled with a less good review. I don’t believe it shows any bias to put up a good review alone. Frankly, I don’t believe that Sasha, Ryan, and the rest could even pretend to be unbiased with the way they write about certain films, (even though I happen to agree with you all most of the time), but a balance of reviews is more fun to read. Again, I think, given the headline that you gave the article, there is nothing wrong with posting the EW review alone, but perhaps more of the good/bad would make people happier? That is of course unless there’s just no bad word to read, as was essentially the case with films like The Social Network and Toy Story 3.

    In particular, I’d really like to see more of the good/bad pairings in regards to the festival films which many of us have not seen yet. I still don’t have a clear picture of what people thought of films like Carnage and A Dangerous Method. It seemed like some people were saying they were very well received and then others said they flopped… so I was left confused.

    In any case, I’ve been coming to awardsdaily/oscarwatch for years due to the quality of writing, etc. and don’t plan on leaving now. I just think that there are ways of giving a clearer picture of what’s being said for those of us not on the festival circuit.

  23. perhaps more of the good/bad would make people happier?

    “Clooney and company could have used Preston Sturges – or, even better, Clifford Odets – when it came to rewrites.” — The New Yorker, Anthony Lane

    thanks, Mr Lane. That’s really helpful advice.
    How about asking Pauline Kael to rewrite your reviews.

  24. perhaps more of the good/bad would make people happier?

    “Clooney and company could have used Preston Sturges – or, even better, Clifford Odets – when it came to rewrites.” — The New Yorker, Anthony Lane

    thanks, Mr Lane. That’s really helpful advice.
    How about asking Pauline Kael to rewrite your reviews.

  25. TIME, Richard Corliss

    The Ides of March wants to show the kinship of politics, show business and sex: three activities that demand and reward salesmanship. Clooney is a master of all three; his smooth line, looks and grin allow the public to think they have a clue to his real personality. The actor’s patented tic, in a movie or in an interview, comes in that microsecond before he answers a question, and his mouth betrays an emotion that might be ironic or exasperated, but instantly relaxes into the famously open, indulgent smile.

    That engaging mannerism is on full display in The Ides of March, in Clooney’s performance and in Gosling’s as well. It’s not a natural fit, since the young actor, acclaimed in indie circles for roles in The Believer, Half Nelson, Lars and the Real Girl, Blue Valentine and Drive, is an intense Method man who has never relaxed for a moment on-screen. But Gosling has studied Clooney’s ease in being watched and adored, and his surface charm (which in movie stars we call real charm). Clooney has it; Gosling’s trying to learn it. All this is appropriate to the character of Stephen, who has Morris’s drive and a little of his star quality. Gradually, Gosling acquires the Clooney twinkle, the simulation of intimacy, the effect of gravitas — which is to say, the actor’s ability to deceive.

    With Clooney’s connivance, and in a film stuffed with savvy work by veteran players, Gosling lures the movie’s emotional center away from Morris and into Stephen’s mind, where angels swim and demons lurk. The Ides of March says that American politics is a beachfront property with sharks surfing the waves. That makes this skeptical, savory movie a rich offering from Hollywood’s liberal Ambassador, and a splendid diversion from the drab crankiness of real politics.

    [Sharp-eyed readers will note that the better review gets a bigger quote block than the negative one.]

  26. TIME, Richard Corliss

    The Ides of March wants to show the kinship of politics, show business and sex: three activities that demand and reward salesmanship. Clooney is a master of all three; his smooth line, looks and grin allow the public to think they have a clue to his real personality. The actor’s patented tic, in a movie or in an interview, comes in that microsecond before he answers a question, and his mouth betrays an emotion that might be ironic or exasperated, but instantly relaxes into the famously open, indulgent smile.

    That engaging mannerism is on full display in The Ides of March, in Clooney’s performance and in Gosling’s as well. It’s not a natural fit, since the young actor, acclaimed in indie circles for roles in The Believer, Half Nelson, Lars and the Real Girl, Blue Valentine and Drive, is an intense Method man who has never relaxed for a moment on-screen. But Gosling has studied Clooney’s ease in being watched and adored, and his surface charm (which in movie stars we call real charm). Clooney has it; Gosling’s trying to learn it. All this is appropriate to the character of Stephen, who has Morris’s drive and a little of his star quality. Gradually, Gosling acquires the Clooney twinkle, the simulation of intimacy, the effect of gravitas — which is to say, the actor’s ability to deceive.

    With Clooney’s connivance, and in a film stuffed with savvy work by veteran players, Gosling lures the movie’s emotional center away from Morris and into Stephen’s mind, where angels swim and demons lurk. The Ides of March says that American politics is a beachfront property with sharks surfing the waves. That makes this skeptical, savory movie a rich offering from Hollywood’s liberal Ambassador, and a splendid diversion from the drab crankiness of real politics.

    [Sharp-eyed readers will note that the better review gets a bigger quote block than the negative one.]

  27. Seems like George doesn’t want to hype or even mention “The Descendants.” An embarssament of riches for George? Or confusion for the Academy? AND the viewers?

    Might be a simpler explanation. Such as maybe Clooney’s not a full-time Oscar whore. Maybe he’s got other things on his mind sometimes.

  28. Seems like George doesn’t want to hype or even mention “The Descendants.” An embarssament of riches for George? Or confusion for the Academy? AND the viewers?

    Might be a simpler explanation. Such as maybe Clooney’s not a full-time Oscar whore. Maybe he’s got other things on his mind sometimes.

  29. that’s fair ryan. I agree with parts of what you say and disagree with others. You have every right to single out the single best review on “ides” if you’ve decided that you want to positively promote it. i’m just not sure why. i’m just wondering why you don’t do that for every movie that comes out if that’s your goal? is it because of the talented cast? I guess i’m taking the opposite spin and am saying a movie with that talented a cast should be doing better than just slightly better than mediocre reviews and i’m concerned though not surprised because clooney’s track record as a director is muddled.

    as for your comment on “the help” where you say, “worth pointing out that The Help has a metascore average of 62.That number is not going to make us give up on it. The Help has qualities that make the ‘consensus’ of critics moot.”

    I don’t get this either. What does this mean? Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.

  30. that’s fair ryan. I agree with parts of what you say and disagree with others. You have every right to single out the single best review on “ides” if you’ve decided that you want to positively promote it. i’m just not sure why. i’m just wondering why you don’t do that for every movie that comes out if that’s your goal? is it because of the talented cast? I guess i’m taking the opposite spin and am saying a movie with that talented a cast should be doing better than just slightly better than mediocre reviews and i’m concerned though not surprised because clooney’s track record as a director is muddled.

    as for your comment on “the help” where you say, “worth pointing out that The Help has a metascore average of 62.That number is not going to make us give up on it. The Help has qualities that make the ‘consensus’ of critics moot.”

    I don’t get this either. What does this mean? Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.

  31. i’m just wondering why you don’t do that for every movie that comes out if that’s your goal?

    I do it for every movie I like. I do it for every movie that Sasha likes.

    I can understand if nobody cares what I like. I can’t understand why it’s not recognizable as human nature to look for higher authorities to help support what I think.

    Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.

    I don’t think The Ides of March or The Help were made with Oscars as their goal. I feel confident they were made with intentions to entertain and even attempt to enlighten. I don’t think many movies are made with that goal, and I almost always despise and ignore the movies that seem to have Oscar as their sole motivation for existing.

    The Help is a hugely popular movie. That weighs as much in the slant I’ll give it as reviews do — because I liked The Help.

    Key point here, probably obvious: I’m going to promote movies I like,

    If you want to find reports from a movie writer who promotes movies he doesn’t care about, then you’re reading the wrong guy.

  32. i’m just wondering why you don’t do that for every movie that comes out if that’s your goal?

    I do it for every movie I like. I do it for every movie that Sasha likes.

    I can understand if nobody cares what I like. I can’t understand why it’s not recognizable as human nature to look for higher authorities to help support what I think.

    Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.

    I don’t think The Ides of March or The Help were made with Oscars as their goal. I feel confident they were made with intentions to entertain and even attempt to enlighten. I don’t think many movies are made with that goal, and I almost always despise and ignore the movies that seem to have Oscar as their sole motivation for existing.

    The Help is a hugely popular movie. That weighs as much in the slant I’ll give it as reviews do — because I liked The Help.

    Key point here, probably obvious: I’m going to promote movies I like,

    If you want to find reports from a movie writer who promotes movies he doesn’t care about, then you’re reading the wrong guy.

  33. Pierre de Plume

    It’s perfectly reasonable to post a review that’s complimentary of The Ides of March. The fact that critics haven’t uniformly raved about the film doesn’t require a balanced sampling of critical reaction. Posting a positive review reminds us that the film could indeed be a player come Oscar time.

    I’ve been interested in the film since first hearing about it and will see it regardless of the less than unqualified acclaim.

  34. Pierre de Plume

    It’s perfectly reasonable to post a review that’s complimentary of The Ides of March. The fact that critics haven’t uniformly raved about the film doesn’t require a balanced sampling of critical reaction. Posting a positive review reminds us that the film could indeed be a player come Oscar time.

    I’ve been interested in the film since first hearing about it and will see it regardless of the less than unqualified acclaim.

  35. Thanks, Pierre de Plume.

    We know the reviews are mixed. I’m looking for reasons that The Idea of March shouldn’t be dismissed simply because it took some rough punches in the first 5 opinions we heard about.

    I’m looking for those reasons to stay hopeful, and I’m happy to be finding some.

  36. Thanks, Pierre de Plume.

    We know the reviews are mixed. I’m looking for reasons that The Idea of March shouldn’t be dismissed simply because it took some rough punches in the first 5 opinions we heard about.

    I’m looking for those reasons to stay hopeful, and I’m happy to be finding some.

  37. @ryan

    my apologies… i didn’t know you had seen “ides of march”… i take back 90% of what i said cause that changes everything. You should promote movies you like. You didn’t mention anything except for posting the lofty ew review so I didn’t know you had seen it and obviously agreed with the review. This is why i was puzzled. sorry about that.

  38. @ryan

    my apologies… i didn’t know you had seen “ides of march”… i take back 90% of what i said cause that changes everything. You should promote movies you like. You didn’t mention anything except for posting the lofty ew review so I didn’t know you had seen it and obviously agreed with the review. This is why i was puzzled. sorry about that.

  39. as for my comment “Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.”

    I meant the goal of our discussions- not the goal of the movies. If you were promoting a movie that was not good but was oscar-friendly or dismissing a film that was fantastic but not oscar-friendly i would have a problem.

  40. as for my comment “Again, once oscar becomes the goal instead of making great movies (which “the help” is not) I tend to lose interest.”

    I meant the goal of our discussions- not the goal of the movies. If you were promoting a movie that was not good but was oscar-friendly or dismissing a film that was fantastic but not oscar-friendly i would have a problem.

  41. I see what you mean now, drake.

    Wondered if that’s what you meant but wasn’t sure.

    Like it or not, the focus of the Awards Daily is awards. We really do our best to cover a wide range of all kinds of great movies, whether they’re Oscar-friendly or not. But the word Oscar is going to pop up here 40 times a day, and it’s only going to get worse. So buckle up.

    I didn’t post this review as evidence for the movie’s Oscar worthiness. I posted it because I want to show the movie is worth seeing. On its own terms.

  42. I see what you mean now, drake.

    Wondered if that’s what you meant but wasn’t sure.

    Like it or not, the focus of the Awards Daily is awards. We really do our best to cover a wide range of all kinds of great movies, whether they’re Oscar-friendly or not. But the word Oscar is going to pop up here 40 times a day, and it’s only going to get worse. So buckle up.

    I didn’t post this review as evidence for the movie’s Oscar worthiness. I posted it because I want to show the movie is worth seeing. On its own terms.

  43. If you were promoting a movie that was not good but was oscar-friendly or dismissing a film that was fantastic but not oscar-friendly i would have a problem.

    if I ever do either of those things, feel free to put a bullet in my brain. Put me out of my misery.

  44. If you were promoting a movie that was not good but was oscar-friendly or dismissing a film that was fantastic but not oscar-friendly i would have a problem.

    if I ever do either of those things, feel free to put a bullet in my brain. Put me out of my misery.

  45. I totally get it now ryan. Sorry again for misunderstanding. I’m buckled up and ready for the word “oscar”. I love your site and have for what seems like a decade (maybe it has been). I just prefer it when “oscar” and “awards” drive discussion of great films, performances, etc and not become the entire conversation. I had worried that was happening here when i thought you were promoting “ides of march” sight unseen and “the help” which lacks artistic merit. It turns out that you actually like both of these so i’m 100% cool with this (even though i disagree on “the help”).

  46. I totally get it now ryan. Sorry again for misunderstanding. I’m buckled up and ready for the word “oscar”. I love your site and have for what seems like a decade (maybe it has been). I just prefer it when “oscar” and “awards” drive discussion of great films, performances, etc and not become the entire conversation. I had worried that was happening here when i thought you were promoting “ides of march” sight unseen and “the help” which lacks artistic merit. It turns out that you actually like both of these so i’m 100% cool with this (even though i disagree on “the help”).

  47. I just prefer it when “oscar” and “awards” drive discussion of great films, performances, etc and not become the entire conversation.

    as a longtime loyal reader of the site, you know I feel the same way, drake.

    I had worried that was happening here when i thought you were promoting “ides of march” sight unseen

    nope, I haven’t seen it. But remember, Sasha went to a screening and gave it her seal of approval.

    Moneyball, Ides Chase the Zeitgeist

    (I was careful not to say that I “liked” Ides of March. Can’t say for sure yet. Can only claim to “care about it” — and the reason I care is because I trust Sasha’s impression. I’ll know how I feel about Ides of March tomorrow. If I suddenly stop talking about it you’ll know that I stopped caring.)

    ;-)

  48. I just prefer it when “oscar” and “awards” drive discussion of great films, performances, etc and not become the entire conversation.

    as a longtime loyal reader of the site, you know I feel the same way, drake.

    I had worried that was happening here when i thought you were promoting “ides of march” sight unseen

    nope, I haven’t seen it. But remember, Sasha went to a screening and gave it her seal of approval.

    Moneyball, Ides Chase the Zeitgeist

    (I was careful not to say that I “liked” Ides of March. Can’t say for sure yet. Can only claim to “care about it” — and the reason I care is because I trust Sasha’s impression. I’ll know how I feel about Ides of March tomorrow. If I suddenly stop talking about it you’ll know that I stopped caring.)

    ;-)

  49. I hardly ever agree with Gleiberman. But, he speaks the truth. This is Clooney’s best film … by a mile. This will definitely make my Top 10 for 2011.

  50. I hardly ever agree with Gleiberman. But, he speaks the truth. This is Clooney’s best film … by a mile. This will definitely make my Top 10 for 2011.

  51. @ cinesnatch

    clooney’s best film as a director?

  52. @ cinesnatch

    clooney’s best film as a director?

  53. @ drake

    Yeah, I didn’t really care for Good Night and Good Luck and had trouble getting through the football movie. Ides riveted me. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind started off extremely well and then devolved into a mess. Just my take.

  54. @ drake

    Yeah, I didn’t really care for Good Night and Good Luck and had trouble getting through the football movie. Ides riveted me. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind started off extremely well and then devolved into a mess. Just my take.

  55. Ryan, do you think that Ides may have benefited from a platform release? Or, do you think that method is becoming an outdated model? Gosling isn’t a bonified box-office opener. But, then, perhaps going wide is the best way to maximize profit in this instance?

  56. Ryan, do you think that Ides may have benefited from a platform release? Or, do you think that method is becoming an outdated model? Gosling isn’t a bonified box-office opener. But, then, perhaps going wide is the best way to maximize profit in this instance?

  57. By the way, I don’t mind you pimping this film. I’m scared for the BP slate this year. I’m hoping that this will make it in and add so degree of respectability.

  58. By the way, I don’t mind you pimping this film. I’m scared for the BP slate this year. I’m hoping that this will make it in and add so degree of respectability.

  59. MIchelle

    Clooney isn’t talking about The Descendants because it isn’t open or opening yet. Ides Of March is on the plate now….why would he split the focus from his film? He will be talking Descendants plenty come November.

  60. MIchelle

    Clooney isn’t talking about The Descendants because it isn’t open or opening yet. Ides Of March is on the plate now….why would he split the focus from his film? He will be talking Descendants plenty come November.

  61. Question:
    If I know nothing about the political American system, will I enjoy and understand the movie??
    (I’m not from USA, but I’m a cinema lover and I really want to enjoy this film).

  62. Question:
    If I know nothing about the political American system, will I enjoy and understand the movie??
    (I’m not from USA, but I’m a cinema lover and I really want to enjoy this film).

  63. Houstonrufus

    This may be an odd comparison, but I think Ides may have the sort of appeal that Crash had, at least among the Academy voters, not the public. Both are ensemble pieces. The theory as to why Crash won Best Picture that has always made the most sense to me was that Crash appealed strongly to the actor contingent of the Academy voters. Plus, it was set in if not starred LA which was another plus for Crash. I was not a fan of Crash and was frankly devastated when it won Best Picture. And for what it’s worth, I anticipate liking Ides far more. But even with its flaws and just north of middling reviews, I think Ides will appeal to that actor contingent of voters because actors love to support actors and Ides boast a hell of an ensemble. I don’t think Ides will win. But I think it has a good shot at more nominations than its “scores” indicate on first look.

    I think Ryan’s example of The Help’s MC score is a great one. Some films NEED across the board reviews to make the cut. Some don’t. The Help doesn’t need universal acclaim but many expect it to get multiple nominations. I don’t think Ides needs universal acclaim either. Crash certainly didn’t. It’s score on metacritic was a 69. Having said all that, The Help and Crash were also boosted by solid box office. I’m not convinced Ides will be a big hit beyond opening weekend.

  64. Houstonrufus

    This may be an odd comparison, but I think Ides may have the sort of appeal that Crash had, at least among the Academy voters, not the public. Both are ensemble pieces. The theory as to why Crash won Best Picture that has always made the most sense to me was that Crash appealed strongly to the actor contingent of the Academy voters. Plus, it was set in if not starred LA which was another plus for Crash. I was not a fan of Crash and was frankly devastated when it won Best Picture. And for what it’s worth, I anticipate liking Ides far more. But even with its flaws and just north of middling reviews, I think Ides will appeal to that actor contingent of voters because actors love to support actors and Ides boast a hell of an ensemble. I don’t think Ides will win. But I think it has a good shot at more nominations than its “scores” indicate on first look.

    I think Ryan’s example of The Help’s MC score is a great one. Some films NEED across the board reviews to make the cut. Some don’t. The Help doesn’t need universal acclaim but many expect it to get multiple nominations. I don’t think Ides needs universal acclaim either. Crash certainly didn’t. It’s score on metacritic was a 69. Having said all that, The Help and Crash were also boosted by solid box office. I’m not convinced Ides will be a big hit beyond opening weekend.

  65. @ cinesnatch

    “Yeah, I didn’t really care for Good Night and Good Luck and had trouble getting through the football movie. Ides riveted me. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind started off extremely well and then devolved into a mess. Just my take.”

    this is fine with me. I liked Good Night and Good Luck but didn’t have it as a top 20 film of that year. I hope “ides” is better.

    I mostly just wanted to clarify that you were saying it was clooney’s best effort as a director, and not all around best effort (actor), which i consider much loftier praise of course.

  66. @ cinesnatch

    “Yeah, I didn’t really care for Good Night and Good Luck and had trouble getting through the football movie. Ides riveted me. Confessions of a Dangerous Mind started off extremely well and then devolved into a mess. Just my take.”

    this is fine with me. I liked Good Night and Good Luck but didn’t have it as a top 20 film of that year. I hope “ides” is better.

    I mostly just wanted to clarify that you were saying it was clooney’s best effort as a director, and not all around best effort (actor), which i consider much loftier praise of course.

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