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OscarWatch – Meryl Streep and Glenn Close

If you came of age in the 1980s, you lived through a time when American actresses did not depend on conventional, youthful good looks, or hotness, to get on the A list.  The good parts went to those who took the craft seriously.  A lot has changed since then.  If you look at the Best Actress race of the 1970s, 1980s and even into the 1990s, the Best Actress race was dominated by strong roles, with established, respected actresses, many of them homegrown here in America, with well-earned clout in Hollywood — clout that was built on their talent, not just how much money they brought in.  Their Oscar nominations bolstered their dominance.  But something shifted.    Was it the moment the young, fresh, charismatic but untrained Julia Roberts became a box office sensation, thus rendering actresses who couldn’t “open” movies obsolete?   Was it the general globalization of the film industry overall? Was it the rise of the target demographic aimed at young boys?

It’s hard to know.  Surely, there is nothing wrong with foreign actresses working in American film – Greta Garbo, Ingrid Bergman, Liv Ullman, Vanessa Redgrave — but it’s also lamentable that there are far far fewer American actresses mow, the real powerhouse performers, as it seems there used to be.  It is almost as if we can’t find women who are beautiful and sound smart unless we import them from overseas.

But Glenn Close and Meryl Streep were two of the last big stars to come out of a time when acting ability counted for more than hotness or profitability; Meryl Streep keeps making movies because her movies make money.  She keeps getting Oscar nominations because actresses in The States aren’t reared the same way — their budding talent is plucked long before they really have a chance to hone their craft. Then they’re used up and cast aside once their good looks run out. Or they keep botoxing themselves to oblivion in order to keep working.  Our actresses are not allowed to age gracefully — and those who do can’t get work.  I happened to catch Jill Clayburgh playing Kristin Wiig’s mother in Bridesmaids and was taken aback that she actually looked her age: she hadn’t gone under the knife to try to keep up with the extreme suppression of female aging.  She looked beautiful — real — her experiences in life recorded for all time on her wonderful face.  Where did Jane Fonda’s go?  Yes, she gets props for looking so much younger than she is. But she, like Faye Dunaway, like every woman who hides who they are, has a self-inflicted in-authenticity that, quite simply, does not work on film.  Fake youth displays our vanity.  If you are an actress playing a character in real life you have to explain all of that surgery.  Oh, Jill Clayburgh — you are the stuff that American actresses should be made on.

But if you were a young adult in 1980s, as I was, you wouldn’t be surprised that someone like Holly Hunter, or Frances McDormand would follow in the footsteps of Streep and Close — these women took acting so seriously that where you went to school and what plays you did mattered as much as how good you looked on film.  Such is not the case anymore, not anywhere. It doesn’t matter where you went to school and it doesn’t matter if you’ve done theater or not. In fact, today’s actresses do theater long after they’ve become established in film.

Most young American actresses don’t even go to college, let alone graduate school.  And so I thought I’d take a look back at the careers of Streep and Close and celebrate them for what they’ve contributed to the craft of acting, and how that was reflected and appreciated throughout Oscar history.

Meryl Streep: BA, Vasser; MFA, Yale.  Perfected her acting at the New York Shakespeare Festival.  Was never considered conventionally beautiful, Dino De Laurentiis supposedly said about her when she auditioned for King Kong, “She’s ugly. Why did you bring me this thing?”  And, as the story goes, was shocked when Streep answered him back in fluent Italian.  That did not motivate Streep to get her nose fixed or to try to fit in — she didn’t like the rules so she changed the game.  It wasn’t long before Streep evolved out of theater into film.  It turned out that the camera loved Streep.  Her beauty came on like Garbo’s — once you got used to it you were mesmerized by it.  I know that I was.  And I remember thinking at the time that if Meryl Streep could make it in Hollywood with that crooked nose, and by being a great actress, anyone could.  But no one looked like her — no one had those cheekbones, those watery, pink-rimmed eyes, that mouth.

As a young actress, Streep’s ability was immediately noticeable, even if she was playing ingenues.  And yet, all of her great early performances couldn’t really prepare us for what she did in Sophie’s Choice.  Can you imagine, with all of that Kevin Kline scenery chewing going on that the only thing you noticed in the movie was Meryl Streep?  Not only did she transform her body to play the voluptuous Sophie, utilizing a tooth piece to make her lips look fuller, but she starved herself for days, living on, she said, only white wine to play concentration camp Sophie.  That performance may be among the best anyone has ever given, male or female. In fact, I might hold it up there in the top five of all time, right up there with Robert De Niro in Raging Bull.

Her brilliance in Sophie’s Choice, however, remains her biggest problem for an Oscar win now.  She currently holds the record for the most Oscar nominations, 16, and has survived the devolution of strong female leads in Hollywood. She also survived all of the talk that she’s just about the wig and the accent. She has been acting in films for four decades and is still giving us one surprising, brilliant performance after the next. The Oscar nominations are well deserved. She has no equal. Strangely, her career now seems stronger than it’s ever been. And yet…

But she does have the Sophie’s Choice problem. Streep has only won a single Oscar for Best Actress for Sophie’s Choice, and a Supporting for Kramer vs. Kramer, which seems almost like a joke considering the great works she’s done since then: A Cry in the Dark, Silkwood, The Devil Wears Prada, Doubt and Julie & Julia.

Gold Derby currently has her at number one, with Octavia Spencer to be the one winner from The Help, not Viola Davis. The reason Streep rises to the top every year, even before anyone has seen her performance, is because of her forty years plus of cinematic genius. She might have won for Julie & Julia if it hadn’t been for the Julie part of the movie, which forever ruined it for Oscar. Streep always elevates the work. If Nora Ephron had made that movie just about Julia Child, Ephron herself might have been looking at an Oscar nomination for Best Picture and Director – an unexpected collaboration burst forth when Ephron had the brilliant Streep to work with. Lesser directors and writers are immediately classed up when they work with her because she brings not only her education to the work, but her life experience.

Even Mamma Mia, mostly a throwaway film, was made tolerable by Streep – who took her role right to the edge. That is why, probably, that Oscarologists, as Tom O’Neil calls them, have Streep in the number one position, with or without its inexperienced, untested director.

Glenn Close

Glenn Close leads this year for having delivered a brilliant performance in Albert Nobbs – understated, dark, but compassionate in its own sweet way. Close, though, doesn’t turn in the showiest performance in this movie – her co-star, Janet McTeer does. But that doesn’t make Close’s performance any less so. The two of them together make Albert Nobbs moving, melancholy, achingly sad. And yet, Streep is still predicted to beat Glenn Close by people, it should be said, who have not even seen Streep’s work in The Iron Lady beyond the trailer.

Close, like Streep, went to college to study theater. She went to the College of William and Mary and then began a career in theater. Like Streep she entered Hollywood as an unconventional beauty, but instead of playing the bitch, as Streep did, she played gentle characters before breaking out with deeper character studies. Close has mostly gone darker than Streep – though it must be noted that when Streep has gone dark (like in the Manchurian Candidate) it hasn’t been received as well. The Devil Wears Prada would reside somewhere in between. But Close has played truly dark, truly unlikable people – Alex in Fatal Attraction (though if they’d kept the real ending, where she kills herself, she might have emerged as more liked — as it was, she was so unliked that test audiences wanted to see her take a bullet to the chest). Likewise, in Dangerous Liaisons she is the reason true love not only doesn’t prevail but it dies. By the end, no one likes Close’s character.

That unlikability, probably, is probably what has kept her from winning all of this time. It’s easier to digest on television, where Close has won actual awards for playing Patty Hewes in Damages. But should she ever play someone as heroic and likable as Streep in Sophie’s Choice? Well, the Oscar is hers.

Meanwhile, Streep will test her lovability when she plays Margaret Thatcher, a genuinely unlikable figure — in fact, hated by many. Will she make Thatcher more human and vulnerable, as Helen Mirren did in The Queen — a great PR machine for the Royal family, that movie was. Or will Streep pass more harsh judgment on Thatcher and access that thing about her no one likes. It should be interesting, as Streep is, famously, a liberal.

I have been watching this notion that Streep is the defacto winner already with some skepticism.  The year before last (it’s all a blur) when Sandra Bullock was up against Streep it seemed obvious to me that Streep wasn’t going to win fairly early on.  This, because Sandra Bullock was bringing in more box office that year than just about anyone.  But the main reason was that The Blind Side became a Best Picture nominee and that was the key factor.  Even before that, though, it felt like Bullock had it in the bag because to give Streep another Oscar is to give her another Oscar for giving a better performance than her best performance.  When Sean Penn won for Milk he won because (it was a Best Picture nominee but also) he bested his Oscar-winning role in Mystic River.  Jodie Foster bested her work in The Accused with The Silence of the Lambs (Best Picture winner) and Hilary Swank (did not best) her role in Boys Don’t Cry with Million Dollar Baby — but it won Best Picture.

The Best Picture thing is the reason I think Viola Davis, not Streep nor Close, will have the edge, as I believe The Help, box office and cultural phenom that it is, will be the only Best Picture nominee of the three.  However, if The Iron Lady should get nominated, Streep’s chances grow considerably.    The film should also look to get more than just the one Oscar nomination.  Albert Nobbs has a shot for Actress, Supporting Actress and Screenplay (Close should get props for having adapted the script).  The Iron Lady, who knows at this stage.  The Help could get a whole bunch of them.

Whichever way the Oscars turn out, Close and Streep have their place firmly in film history, both for the memorable roles they’ve given us, and for having lasted this long.  One has 16 Oscar nominations and two wins.  The other has five Oscar nominations and no wins.  Yet for both of these women, those stats really have very little to do with who they are and what they’ve done.  Funny, that.

136 Comments on this Post

  1. Excellent commentary, Sasha. I can recall Streep talking about how her scholarship to Yale drama school provided a very intense education which helped fashion an interest and career built on playing very different characters. We don’t see much of that today.

  2. Excellent commentary, Sasha. I can recall Streep talking about how her scholarship to Yale drama school provided a very intense education which helped fashion an interest and career built on playing very different characters. We don’t see much of that today.

  3. And holy crap in that first interview she looks exactly like Mamie.

  4. And holy crap in that first interview she looks exactly like Mamie.

  5. Tero Heikkinen

    I have a feeling that Academy members are more than anxious to hear a 5-min “finally”-speech by Streep, and that in the last few nominations she came in very close second. She’s good on stage, no, wonderful. It would be one of the greatest Oscar moments in recent years. Academy, you know this.

  6. Tero Heikkinen

    I have a feeling that Academy members are more than anxious to hear a 5-min “finally”-speech by Streep, and that in the last few nominations she came in very close second. She’s good on stage, no, wonderful. It would be one of the greatest Oscar moments in recent years. Academy, you know this.

  7. Is it just me or is anyone else getting the feeling that Glenn Close’s status as a frontrunner is being shoved down everyone’s throat a la Anette Benning last year? Surely it’s not a bad performance, but I doubt it would have gained much traction without the incessant coverage on blogs..

  8. Is it just me or is anyone else getting the feeling that Glenn Close’s status as a frontrunner is being shoved down everyone’s throat a la Anette Benning last year? Surely it’s not a bad performance, but I doubt it would have gained much traction without the incessant coverage on blogs..

  9. Adam Lewis

    Streep is the greatest!!

    Btw – Diane Cilento (1963 Best supporting Actress nominee has died aged 78 – cancer)

  10. Adam Lewis

    Streep is the greatest!!

    Btw – Diane Cilento (1963 Best supporting Actress nominee has died aged 78 – cancer)

  11. Adam Lewis

    Actually just read SASHA’S article – this is one of your best, Sasha! Favourite part – your mention of the wonderful Jill Clayburgh! Oh what a woman she was – absolutely gorgeous in Silver Streak! I would also mention jane Alexander An unconventional beauty with supreme talent.

  12. Adam Lewis

    Actually just read SASHA’S article – this is one of your best, Sasha! Favourite part – your mention of the wonderful Jill Clayburgh! Oh what a woman she was – absolutely gorgeous in Silver Streak! I would also mention jane Alexander An unconventional beauty with supreme talent.

  13. A fun read. I would love to see Streep and Close do an interview together; they’ve known each other since the mid 70s, when as theatre actresses they were often in competition for the same roles. Probably an interesting dynamic there – a little rivalry, a lot of respect and two brilliant careers.

  14. A fun read. I would love to see Streep and Close do an interview together; they’ve known each other since the mid 70s, when as theatre actresses they were often in competition for the same roles. Probably an interesting dynamic there – a little rivalry, a lot of respect and two brilliant careers.

  15. Paddy M

    @ Kurt, I get the Annette Bening comparison, although I consider Close to be the stronger actress, and she has been working in film for longer than Bening. Also, Bening’s Oscar nominations have occurred steadily, whereas Close had an incredible run in the 80s and lost all five times. These days, that wouldn’t happen – you can’t be that prolific and that good and not win an Oscar these days.

    That clip of Close in Dangerous Liaisons is chilling. From start to finish, some of the finest acting ever put on screen. A preceding scene, in which she declares war upon John Malkovich’s character, is equally good. I’ve watched that film many times, purely for her performance.

    Sasha, I agree with you about Viola Davis though. I think the popularity of her character and the popularity of the film make her the frontrunner, and I can see her maintaining this good buzz all throughout the season, even if she doesn’t reap a lot of critics awards. The Iron Lady currently isn’t looking likely to be good enough to secure a Best Picture nomination, and I think Streep is probably only Gold Derby’s frontrunner because so many are able to agree that Streep will surely be nominated – it’s a safe bet. Ask people who they think will win though, and Streep may not sustain such a strong lead.

  16. Paddy M

    @ Kurt, I get the Annette Bening comparison, although I consider Close to be the stronger actress, and she has been working in film for longer than Bening. Also, Bening’s Oscar nominations have occurred steadily, whereas Close had an incredible run in the 80s and lost all five times. These days, that wouldn’t happen – you can’t be that prolific and that good and not win an Oscar these days.

    That clip of Close in Dangerous Liaisons is chilling. From start to finish, some of the finest acting ever put on screen. A preceding scene, in which she declares war upon John Malkovich’s character, is equally good. I’ve watched that film many times, purely for her performance.

    Sasha, I agree with you about Viola Davis though. I think the popularity of her character and the popularity of the film make her the frontrunner, and I can see her maintaining this good buzz all throughout the season, even if she doesn’t reap a lot of critics awards. The Iron Lady currently isn’t looking likely to be good enough to secure a Best Picture nomination, and I think Streep is probably only Gold Derby’s frontrunner because so many are able to agree that Streep will surely be nominated – it’s a safe bet. Ask people who they think will win though, and Streep may not sustain such a strong lead.

  17. Meryl should finally win that third Oscar!!!

  18. Meryl should finally win that third Oscar!!!

  19. steve50

    “It is almost as if we can’t find women who are beautiful and sound smart unless we import them from overseas.”

    I think it goes deeper than that. I’ll go out on a limb and say that nearly every critically acclaimed female performance comes from independent film makers or foreign fare, not the mainstream American factory. McDormand and Burstyn, for example, turn in their best work outside of the studios with oddball directors (Portman last year, same story). The imported foreign actresses have always already made their mark when they are enticed to Hollywood. From Signoret, Deneuve, Magnani to Ullmann, Huppert, Christie and Scott Thomas, they’ve already been noticed when they are lured into the machinery, only to leave (if not outright, flee) after a couple of years. I expect that Cotillard has already packed her bags. They leave and return to doing what they do best. Maggie Smith always said that movies were just “pin money.”

    I think the US demographics (adolescent male, etc) can take some of the blame, but it goes deeper into the culture and corporate structure than just that. There are only a few countries remaining that have not had a female prime minister or president, and you-know-who is one of them. Strength and intelligence as goals are given great lip-service to both males and females as they pass through their formative years, but just as Wall Street has its glass ceilings, so does the US entertainment industry. The fact that Streep and Close (and a few other homegrown American actresses) have thrived is a miracle, yet their work nearly always surpasses the vehicles in which they appear.

    Betty White, as Rose, in the Golden Girls had a line that still resonates: When the girls are listing things the just don’t understand about the world, Rose says, ” and I don’t understand the spokesmodel category of Star Search.” 25+ years later, and I think we know that that category is where we are getting our US female “stars”.

  20. steve50

    “It is almost as if we can’t find women who are beautiful and sound smart unless we import them from overseas.”

    I think it goes deeper than that. I’ll go out on a limb and say that nearly every critically acclaimed female performance comes from independent film makers or foreign fare, not the mainstream American factory. McDormand and Burstyn, for example, turn in their best work outside of the studios with oddball directors (Portman last year, same story). The imported foreign actresses have always already made their mark when they are enticed to Hollywood. From Signoret, Deneuve, Magnani to Ullmann, Huppert, Christie and Scott Thomas, they’ve already been noticed when they are lured into the machinery, only to leave (if not outright, flee) after a couple of years. I expect that Cotillard has already packed her bags. They leave and return to doing what they do best. Maggie Smith always said that movies were just “pin money.”

    I think the US demographics (adolescent male, etc) can take some of the blame, but it goes deeper into the culture and corporate structure than just that. There are only a few countries remaining that have not had a female prime minister or president, and you-know-who is one of them. Strength and intelligence as goals are given great lip-service to both males and females as they pass through their formative years, but just as Wall Street has its glass ceilings, so does the US entertainment industry. The fact that Streep and Close (and a few other homegrown American actresses) have thrived is a miracle, yet their work nearly always surpasses the vehicles in which they appear.

    Betty White, as Rose, in the Golden Girls had a line that still resonates: When the girls are listing things the just don’t understand about the world, Rose says, ” and I don’t understand the spokesmodel category of Star Search.” 25+ years later, and I think we know that that category is where we are getting our US female “stars”.

  21. Sasha you need to make a correction. Holly Hunter not Hollywood Hunter.

  22. Sasha you need to make a correction. Holly Hunter not Hollywood Hunter.

  23. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    Sasha you need to make a correction. Holly Hunter not Hollywood Hunter.

    Oh god. I did not. Did I really? Off topic: that’s a great name, though, isn’t it?

  24. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    Sasha you need to make a correction. Holly Hunter not Hollywood Hunter.

    Oh god. I did not. Did I really? Off topic: that’s a great name, though, isn’t it?

  25. Marshall1

    That’s why it’s refreshing to have someone like Jessica Chastain in the movies now…..a Julliard-trained actress who’s also more beautiful conventionally. I hope she has a nomination in the Tree of Life…A nice article about the two great actresses of America.

  26. Marshall1

    That’s why it’s refreshing to have someone like Jessica Chastain in the movies now…..a Julliard-trained actress who’s also more beautiful conventionally. I hope she has a nomination in the Tree of Life…A nice article about the two great actresses of America.

  27. You hit it in on the head…American actresses today have no real training, just instinct, and it shows when they’re in lesser films and can’t elevate it because they have no tools. Someone like Angelina Jolie could be so raw and charismatic, but in a bland film she can’t help but be bland. It’s encouraging to see an actress on the come-up like Elizabeth Olsen who has trained in theater, gone to university and even gone to Russia to study their classic methods. the problem is that most young actresses today just want to be stars and they are pushed into it as unprepared teenagers…almost like models.

  28. You hit it in on the head…American actresses today have no real training, just instinct, and it shows when they’re in lesser films and can’t elevate it because they have no tools. Someone like Angelina Jolie could be so raw and charismatic, but in a bland film she can’t help but be bland. It’s encouraging to see an actress on the come-up like Elizabeth Olsen who has trained in theater, gone to university and even gone to Russia to study their classic methods. the problem is that most young actresses today just want to be stars and they are pushed into it as unprepared teenagers…almost like models.

  29. Excellent points, although the neverending “trained” vs. “untrained” debate is always a bit precarious. Actresses like Charlize Theron, Michelle Williams, Kate Winslet, etc., are not classically trained or have a strong background in the theater like the likes of Close, Streep, Bening, Moore, Dench, etc., but I don’t think that necessarily diminishes their talent or skill or reliability as a performer. And the “charismatic” energy and watchability of someone like Julia Roberts is something that you most certainly can’t learn in an acting class. Sure, Roberts’ appeal is simply her appeal, if you know what I mean. I don’t think Erin Brockovich is one of the greatest performances ever, but it’s undoubtedly one helluva performance that’s elevated by the fact that we, as the audience, are connected to Julia Roberts as a person and are emotionally involved in her struggles, embitterment, rage, passion, etc., throughout the whole film. The character Erin needed someone with that relatability and spark, or else the whole film would’ve been a mess…if you had put that role in the hands of someone like Cate Blanchett–another great actress with a strong background in theater–the film would have been a much, much different film and, I would guess, more of a psychological character study rather than an emotionally resonant, David vs. Goliath story. Anyways, what I guess I’m trying to say is that I’ve never faulted certain actresses (or actors) for their lack of “training”, because oftentimes it seems like the right fit for the narrative.

  30. Excellent points, although the neverending “trained” vs. “untrained” debate is always a bit precarious. Actresses like Charlize Theron, Michelle Williams, Kate Winslet, etc., are not classically trained or have a strong background in the theater like the likes of Close, Streep, Bening, Moore, Dench, etc., but I don’t think that necessarily diminishes their talent or skill or reliability as a performer. And the “charismatic” energy and watchability of someone like Julia Roberts is something that you most certainly can’t learn in an acting class. Sure, Roberts’ appeal is simply her appeal, if you know what I mean. I don’t think Erin Brockovich is one of the greatest performances ever, but it’s undoubtedly one helluva performance that’s elevated by the fact that we, as the audience, are connected to Julia Roberts as a person and are emotionally involved in her struggles, embitterment, rage, passion, etc., throughout the whole film. The character Erin needed someone with that relatability and spark, or else the whole film would’ve been a mess…if you had put that role in the hands of someone like Cate Blanchett–another great actress with a strong background in theater–the film would have been a much, much different film and, I would guess, more of a psychological character study rather than an emotionally resonant, David vs. Goliath story. Anyways, what I guess I’m trying to say is that I’ve never faulted certain actresses (or actors) for their lack of “training”, because oftentimes it seems like the right fit for the narrative.

  31. kerchee

    Nice read, Sasha.

  32. kerchee

    Nice read, Sasha.

  33. What Marshall1 said. At the risk of getting off-topic, I see SO much Streep in Jessica Chastain, even/especially in interviews. Best Performance by Jessica Chastain in a Motion Picture would be quite a category this year. (With Tree of Life winning, in my opinion. The Help is a close runner-up. Anyway.)

    I do find myself rooting for Streep this year even though I’m more excited to see Albert Nobbs as a film. I do feel that Streep needs to be in a film that is great without her elevation in order to win number three.

  34. What Marshall1 said. At the risk of getting off-topic, I see SO much Streep in Jessica Chastain, even/especially in interviews. Best Performance by Jessica Chastain in a Motion Picture would be quite a category this year. (With Tree of Life winning, in my opinion. The Help is a close runner-up. Anyway.)

    I do find myself rooting for Streep this year even though I’m more excited to see Albert Nobbs as a film. I do feel that Streep needs to be in a film that is great without her elevation in order to win number three.

  35. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    @Marshall, Jessica Chastain is really good, really versatile – I hope she keeps working and showing us what she can do. @Ba, I didn’t know Elizabeth Olsen was theater-trained! She’s very good too. I can’t wait to see her evolve as an actress.

  36. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    @Marshall, Jessica Chastain is really good, really versatile – I hope she keeps working and showing us what she can do. @Ba, I didn’t know Elizabeth Olsen was theater-trained! She’s very good too. I can’t wait to see her evolve as an actress.

  37. Sasha, please don’t blame Julia Roberts, she proved that a woman could open a movie on her own.
    It’s rather the fact that there are much much much more CGI / 3D whatever movies and franchises aimed mostly at teens to get quick a lot of money today. Character actresses are not that interesting any more, unfortunately.

    And look at the independent scene, it’s almost vanished nowadays, compared to the 90s (and it had its great boom after Julia Roberts appeared).

    Still, let’s hope for many more years with great roles for Julianne Moore, Kristin Scott Thomas, Tilda Swinton, Meryl Streep, Glenn Close etc.

  38. Sasha, please don’t blame Julia Roberts, she proved that a woman could open a movie on her own.
    It’s rather the fact that there are much much much more CGI / 3D whatever movies and franchises aimed mostly at teens to get quick a lot of money today. Character actresses are not that interesting any more, unfortunately.

    And look at the independent scene, it’s almost vanished nowadays, compared to the 90s (and it had its great boom after Julia Roberts appeared).

    Still, let’s hope for many more years with great roles for Julianne Moore, Kristin Scott Thomas, Tilda Swinton, Meryl Streep, Glenn Close etc.

  39. Bondisteve

    Thoroughly enjoyable commentary on two of the greatest. Here’s hoping there is a resurgence in demand for talent over just beauty and we get to enjoy even more films with groundbreaking female performances from actresses from every corner of the world!

  40. Bondisteve

    Thoroughly enjoyable commentary on two of the greatest. Here’s hoping there is a resurgence in demand for talent over just beauty and we get to enjoy even more films with groundbreaking female performances from actresses from every corner of the world!

  41. Marshall1

    Very good point Aaron. I remember seeing Charlize Theron in Monster and I was thinking, where was that coming from? She just unleashed that raw energy in the performance that I forgot she’s Theron. Still, I think Sasha’s point is very valid and I would like to add hopefully this new generation of trained actresses will inspire more writers to write more female characters with depth for actresses of different ages (“Hey, we’ll still here!”..lol)

  42. Marshall1

    Very good point Aaron. I remember seeing Charlize Theron in Monster and I was thinking, where was that coming from? She just unleashed that raw energy in the performance that I forgot she’s Theron. Still, I think Sasha’s point is very valid and I would like to add hopefully this new generation of trained actresses will inspire more writers to write more female characters with depth for actresses of different ages (“Hey, we’ll still here!”..lol)

  43. Off topic: that’s a great name, though, isn’t it?

    Which one? I love Holly Hunter’s name. I also think Hollywood Hunter sounds like a gay pornstar.

  44. Off topic: that’s a great name, though, isn’t it?

    Which one? I love Holly Hunter’s name. I also think Hollywood Hunter sounds like a gay pornstar.

  45. Definitely an interesting blog. I haven’t been that interested in the Oscars lately, just some lame stuff about who should win it and why haven’t some people already gotten the statuette can ruin my day.

    Anyways, I know for which foreign movie I would vote if I were on the jury: http://shinigamilist.com/2011/10/07/singapores-oscar-nomination-by-yoshihiro-tatsumi/

  46. Definitely an interesting blog. I haven’t been that interested in the Oscars lately, just some lame stuff about who should win it and why haven’t some people already gotten the statuette can ruin my day.

    Anyways, I know for which foreign movie I would vote if I were on the jury: http://shinigamilist.com/2011/10/07/singapores-oscar-nomination-by-yoshihiro-tatsumi/

  47. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    I also think Hollywood Hunter sounds like a gay pornstar.

    That would be West Hollywood Hunter.

  48. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    I also think Hollywood Hunter sounds like a gay pornstar.

    That would be West Hollywood Hunter.

  49. Cyanic: LOL about Hollywood Hunter. It’s so true

    Well to me it seems that courting fame is much more fun and important for the younger actresses nowadays. And THEN a few years later when the 30ish has arrived they desperately want to be taken seriously by doing 1) selected as an UN ambassador for poor children 2) getting pregnant 3) do theater because that is just the right thing to do and 4) get away for a couple of months and return fresh and operated

  50. Cyanic: LOL about Hollywood Hunter. It’s so true

    Well to me it seems that courting fame is much more fun and important for the younger actresses nowadays. And THEN a few years later when the 30ish has arrived they desperately want to be taken seriously by doing 1) selected as an UN ambassador for poor children 2) getting pregnant 3) do theater because that is just the right thing to do and 4) get away for a couple of months and return fresh and operated

  51. Beautiful article, Sasha. Two years on the site and I’m still not totally accustomed to what I see as sometimes sweeping and even a bit harsh generalizations, but … that was a great read.

  52. Beautiful article, Sasha. Two years on the site and I’m still not totally accustomed to what I see as sometimes sweeping and even a bit harsh generalizations, but … that was a great read.

  53. filmlover

    Great read. Really nice.
    So happy to have this site in my life.

  54. filmlover

    Great read. Really nice.
    So happy to have this site in my life.

  55. It is a travesty that Hilary Swank has been awarded more Best Actress Oscars than Meryl Streep.

  56. It is a travesty that Hilary Swank has been awarded more Best Actress Oscars than Meryl Streep.

  57. Camille

    I remember in a documentary of the 70s film Julie Christie saying that actually the 70s weren’t a great time for women in cinema. People just assume it was because there was a big feminist movement when really in cinema it was a strong male energy at the time with Jack Nicholson, De Niro and Pacino getting the great roles. In the 70s, it was Jane Fonda who was the primary female really making her mark and not just playing second fiddle to the men. Then after Fonda slowed down, Meryl Streep took over and became known for the Queen of Accents and almost taken for granted because of it. The 90s weren’t a great time for women. Just look at the nominees, some of the years like 1992, 1994 and 1997 were so weak there was a struggle to find five nominees.

    I think the 80s were a better time for women than the 70s and 90s where you had Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, Jessica Lange, Diane Keaton, Sissy Spacek and Debra Winger getting strong roles and attention. But you have to go back to the 40s to find a time where women truly were being granted great role after great role and successful at the box office on top of that.

  58. Camille

    I remember in a documentary of the 70s film Julie Christie saying that actually the 70s weren’t a great time for women in cinema. People just assume it was because there was a big feminist movement when really in cinema it was a strong male energy at the time with Jack Nicholson, De Niro and Pacino getting the great roles. In the 70s, it was Jane Fonda who was the primary female really making her mark and not just playing second fiddle to the men. Then after Fonda slowed down, Meryl Streep took over and became known for the Queen of Accents and almost taken for granted because of it. The 90s weren’t a great time for women. Just look at the nominees, some of the years like 1992, 1994 and 1997 were so weak there was a struggle to find five nominees.

    I think the 80s were a better time for women than the 70s and 90s where you had Meryl Streep, Glenn Close, Jessica Lange, Diane Keaton, Sissy Spacek and Debra Winger getting strong roles and attention. But you have to go back to the 40s to find a time where women truly were being granted great role after great role and successful at the box office on top of that.

  59. Houstonrufus

    This is a really beautiful piece, Sasha. I adore both actresses. They are so brilliant and reliably so, that I find myself taking them for granted. Thank you for reminding me what important figures they are and what separates them the rest.

  60. Houstonrufus

    This is a really beautiful piece, Sasha. I adore both actresses. They are so brilliant and reliably so, that I find myself taking them for granted. Thank you for reminding me what important figures they are and what separates them the rest.

  61. Great read, Sasha. Streep is simply and undeniably the best and I hope that consensus carries her to a third Oscar (second Best Actress) this year. And yes, she is over due!

  62. Great read, Sasha. Streep is simply and undeniably the best and I hope that consensus carries her to a third Oscar (second Best Actress) this year. And yes, she is over due!

  63. Er, um, I think the wonderful front runner Viola Davis went to Juilliard. And so did Jessica Chastain, as mentioned above and so did Laura Linney.

  64. Er, um, I think the wonderful front runner Viola Davis went to Juilliard. And so did Jessica Chastain, as mentioned above and so did Laura Linney.

  65. Unlikelyhood

    Camille makes a strong point. Ellen Burstyn, 1974 best actress winner, campaigned to have women boycott the following year’s oscars because of what she said were terrible roles for women. A lot of major actresses listened. When Louise Fletcher won for cuckoo’s nest, she sign-languaged her speech and talked about exclusion, and it brought the house down. There may never have been a better acceptance speech – except for Emma Thompson and Susan Sarandon, both for 1995 films.

    I take a backseat to no man in my love for Streep and Close. But this article is too cagey in failing to mention any specific actress born after Hilary Swank. I mean, who are these uneducated, over-pretty types without gravitas? I guess Sasha doesn’t want to get in trouble. But its too easy to counter by mentioning all sorts of ivy league attending pretty women from the next generation – Natalie portman, Anna paquin, Julia stiles, Emma Watson, etc. One could also argue that TV has sucked up all the good talent (and writers) that it never could have imagined having in the 1980s. I mean just look at the Emmy nominees for drama actress in the last ten years or so. Amazing women doing astonishing work, whatever their looks or training. Far more (as a proportion) than their compatriots on the silver screen.

    I agree with people who say we are living in a post-feminist world – that “the hottie mystique” has replaced “the feminine mystique” (after all, look at comics vs. movie Mystique). I think Hollywood (hunter or not) is more of an accomplice than a trailblazer on this.

  66. Unlikelyhood

    Camille makes a strong point. Ellen Burstyn, 1974 best actress winner, campaigned to have women boycott the following year’s oscars because of what she said were terrible roles for women. A lot of major actresses listened. When Louise Fletcher won for cuckoo’s nest, she sign-languaged her speech and talked about exclusion, and it brought the house down. There may never have been a better acceptance speech – except for Emma Thompson and Susan Sarandon, both for 1995 films.

    I take a backseat to no man in my love for Streep and Close. But this article is too cagey in failing to mention any specific actress born after Hilary Swank. I mean, who are these uneducated, over-pretty types without gravitas? I guess Sasha doesn’t want to get in trouble. But its too easy to counter by mentioning all sorts of ivy league attending pretty women from the next generation – Natalie portman, Anna paquin, Julia stiles, Emma Watson, etc. One could also argue that TV has sucked up all the good talent (and writers) that it never could have imagined having in the 1980s. I mean just look at the Emmy nominees for drama actress in the last ten years or so. Amazing women doing astonishing work, whatever their looks or training. Far more (as a proportion) than their compatriots on the silver screen.

    I agree with people who say we are living in a post-feminist world – that “the hottie mystique” has replaced “the feminine mystique” (after all, look at comics vs. movie Mystique). I think Hollywood (hunter or not) is more of an accomplice than a trailblazer on this.

  67. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    Natalie portman, Anna paquin, Julia stiles, Emma Watson

    I didn’t say ivy league educated – I said trained in theater. Studied acting. Honed their craft before they became movie stars. Um, none of those girls did I don’t think. My point is that British actresses are often cast as beautiful young women because they “sound smart.” American women don’t, not unless they work harder to learn what real acting is. Just my opinion.

  68. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    Natalie portman, Anna paquin, Julia stiles, Emma Watson

    I didn’t say ivy league educated – I said trained in theater. Studied acting. Honed their craft before they became movie stars. Um, none of those girls did I don’t think. My point is that British actresses are often cast as beautiful young women because they “sound smart.” American women don’t, not unless they work harder to learn what real acting is. Just my opinion.

  69. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    It is a travesty that Hilary Swank has been awarded more Best Actress Oscars than Meryl Streep.

    They both have two.

  70. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    It is a travesty that Hilary Swank has been awarded more Best Actress Oscars than Meryl Streep.

    They both have two.

  71. Don’t get me wrong. I love Cher. But Glenn Close gave the BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN 1988 with her stunning performance in “Dangerous Liasons”. In my opinion, nothing can top that that final shot of the lead taking off her make-off, slowly pealing off the layers of her character. I thought it was a sublime moment of acting.

  72. Don’t get me wrong. I love Cher. But Glenn Close gave the BEST PERFORMANCE BY AN ACTRESS IN 1988 with her stunning performance in “Dangerous Liasons”. In my opinion, nothing can top that that final shot of the lead taking off her make-off, slowly pealing off the layers of her character. I thought it was a sublime moment of acting.

  73. Sasha, you are wrong. Meryl Streep has a Best Actress and a Best SUPPORTING Actress Oscar. Hilary Swank has 2 Best Actress Oscars. There is a difference. Just ask Meryl Streep. She’ll correct you.

  74. Sasha, you are wrong. Meryl Streep has a Best Actress and a Best SUPPORTING Actress Oscar. Hilary Swank has 2 Best Actress Oscars. There is a difference. Just ask Meryl Streep. She’ll correct you.

  75. @keifer

    Jodie Foster won in 1988, where Glenn was nominated for DL, not Cher. That was the year before.

  76. @keifer

    Jodie Foster won in 1988, where Glenn was nominated for DL, not Cher. That was the year before.

  77. Great column Sasha!!! I agree that the true test of stardom is on how well you do in your craft… Streep and Close are the perfect epitome of this… The longevity of their career is immeasurable for they always seek knowledge in their craft and continues to deliver quality performance after the other… I guess it has changed now… One could only wish that these two to take home the golden statuette this season for the work in their respective films (well, The Iron Lady is still a question mark, but knowing Streep), and to know that only one could get it is something very dismal. But with the winners of the past decade in SOME categories, one could question if do Oscars (as the film industry’s highest award-giving body) still celebrates the cream of the crop… I don’t want to be naive, I say NO…

  78. Great column Sasha!!! I agree that the true test of stardom is on how well you do in your craft… Streep and Close are the perfect epitome of this… The longevity of their career is immeasurable for they always seek knowledge in their craft and continues to deliver quality performance after the other… I guess it has changed now… One could only wish that these two to take home the golden statuette this season for the work in their respective films (well, The Iron Lady is still a question mark, but knowing Streep), and to know that only one could get it is something very dismal. But with the winners of the past decade in SOME categories, one could question if do Oscars (as the film industry’s highest award-giving body) still celebrates the cream of the crop… I don’t want to be naive, I say NO…

  79. Well I got my first laugh of the day from the Hollywood Hunter gay pornstar thing. Loved it and can’t wait to see who claims the name and becomes a porn star legend.

  80. Well I got my first laugh of the day from the Hollywood Hunter gay pornstar thing. Loved it and can’t wait to see who claims the name and becomes a porn star legend.

  81. Tero Heikkinen

    It’s funny how Hollywood people (and many others) consider Supporting Oscar a lesser one. I know that in a way it is. All actors want to win for Lead. I agree that Hilary and Meryl are not on the same level here – two Leading trophies is not the same as one Leading and one Supporting. Only the amount of trophies is the same. There are sound guys, VFX guys, composers etc that have more, but that’s due to less professionals working on their own fields…

    Someone said that it’s a travesty that Hilary has two Best Actress Oscars when Meryl has just one. I would add that it’s a travesty that ANYONE has two Best Actress Oscars when Meryl has just one.

    Ok, Supporting is considered the lesser one. Compare this to the two sound categories where the other one is more important; despite their confusing titles today. Or if you’re brave, compare it to Documentary Feature and Short Subject – no-one cares about the latter.

    Michael Caine once said that he wants a Leading Oscar, and that that is the ultimate prize for an actor. He has two Supporting trophies, he appreciates them, but he would rather have one Leading than two Supporting. He said that somewhere.

    You know it from the show itself, they give out Supporting early in the show, and you get 2 mins tops – no matter who you are. 45 second rule applies here only if you’re practically nobody. Last year was a great exception, they didn’t play people out really (Leo took her time). In Leading categories you may give a 5-6 minute speech – in almost all cases.

    You also see this in voting behaviour. Supporting Oscars may be given for – sort of – Lifetime Achievement awards, but they tend to think things more thoroughly in Leading categories.

    So, Supporting is not Leading, but… BUT… think of these categories as to which one of these is the more crowded one. Supporting, naturally. That’s why these categories are harder to predict. When was the last time you predicted all ten Supporting nominees? Never? Good. But you always get at least 8 of the 10 Leading nominees correctly.

    I guess everybody has an opinion on this. I see it like this: if the value (=appreciation) of Leading Oscar is 100%, Supporting is about 70%.

    This is why I believe that no matter what Meryl does in Supporting, she will not get it. Hollywood wants to give her a Leading trophy. When the time is right. Next year it could be, Best Actress is not that crowded, IMO.

    Just my 2 cents (one for Supporting).

  82. Tero Heikkinen

    It’s funny how Hollywood people (and many others) consider Supporting Oscar a lesser one. I know that in a way it is. All actors want to win for Lead. I agree that Hilary and Meryl are not on the same level here – two Leading trophies is not the same as one Leading and one Supporting. Only the amount of trophies is the same. There are sound guys, VFX guys, composers etc that have more, but that’s due to less professionals working on their own fields…

    Someone said that it’s a travesty that Hilary has two Best Actress Oscars when Meryl has just one. I would add that it’s a travesty that ANYONE has two Best Actress Oscars when Meryl has just one.

    Ok, Supporting is considered the lesser one. Compare this to the two sound categories where the other one is more important; despite their confusing titles today. Or if you’re brave, compare it to Documentary Feature and Short Subject – no-one cares about the latter.

    Michael Caine once said that he wants a Leading Oscar, and that that is the ultimate prize for an actor. He has two Supporting trophies, he appreciates them, but he would rather have one Leading than two Supporting. He said that somewhere.

    You know it from the show itself, they give out Supporting early in the show, and you get 2 mins tops – no matter who you are. 45 second rule applies here only if you’re practically nobody. Last year was a great exception, they didn’t play people out really (Leo took her time). In Leading categories you may give a 5-6 minute speech – in almost all cases.

    You also see this in voting behaviour. Supporting Oscars may be given for – sort of – Lifetime Achievement awards, but they tend to think things more thoroughly in Leading categories.

    So, Supporting is not Leading, but… BUT… think of these categories as to which one of these is the more crowded one. Supporting, naturally. That’s why these categories are harder to predict. When was the last time you predicted all ten Supporting nominees? Never? Good. But you always get at least 8 of the 10 Leading nominees correctly.

    I guess everybody has an opinion on this. I see it like this: if the value (=appreciation) of Leading Oscar is 100%, Supporting is about 70%.

    This is why I believe that no matter what Meryl does in Supporting, she will not get it. Hollywood wants to give her a Leading trophy. When the time is right. Next year it could be, Best Actress is not that crowded, IMO.

    Just my 2 cents (one for Supporting).

  83. julian the emperor

    I think it is a peculiar trait of yours, Sasha, to always focus attention on how America is robbed time and time again of recognition on behalf of foreign (mostly British) people (an ongoing saga from last years’ race). It is a strange thing to observe (from a European perspective) this incessant worry about American cultural hegemony being in decline…I mean, 95 % of all Oscars are probably still being handed out to Americans, you want it to be a perfect 100 %? Or, what exactly, is your problem?

  84. julian the emperor

    I think it is a peculiar trait of yours, Sasha, to always focus attention on how America is robbed time and time again of recognition on behalf of foreign (mostly British) people (an ongoing saga from last years’ race). It is a strange thing to observe (from a European perspective) this incessant worry about American cultural hegemony being in decline…I mean, 95 % of all Oscars are probably still being handed out to Americans, you want it to be a perfect 100 %? Or, what exactly, is your problem?

  85. It will be interesting to see just where the foreign actors fall this year, re: what was being mentioned just above here?^

    Like for instance, Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo for
    ‘The Artist’ and Marion Cotillard for “Midnight in Paris.” They may ALLLL get nominated.

  86. It will be interesting to see just where the foreign actors fall this year, re: what was being mentioned just above here?^

    Like for instance, Jean Dujardin and Berenice Bejo for
    ‘The Artist’ and Marion Cotillard for “Midnight in Paris.” They may ALLLL get nominated.

  87. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    julian the emperor,

    While you’re wondering who has what sort of ‘problem’ for wanting to honor her country’s film industry, go see how many American actresses have won the Goya, the Cesar, the Donatello and the Lola.

    I will say that the BAFTAs have awarded Best Actress to American women a dozen times since 1980.

    But over the past decade, 40% of Best Actress nominees have come from outside the US.

    And only half the Best Actress winners in the past 10 years have been American. 50%

  88. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    julian the emperor,

    While you’re wondering who has what sort of ‘problem’ for wanting to honor her country’s film industry, go see how many American actresses have won the Goya, the Cesar, the Donatello and the Lola.

    I will say that the BAFTAs have awarded Best Actress to American women a dozen times since 1980.

    But over the past decade, 40% of Best Actress nominees have come from outside the US.

    And only half the Best Actress winners in the past 10 years have been American. 50%

  89. neither of them will win

  90. neither of them will win

  91. Thanks for the correction, Sasha. Yes, of course, it was the “Jodie Foster” year in that rape movie. Very distasteful, disturbing film, I thought. After repeated viewings, I still think Glenn Close gave the Best Actress performance in 1988 for “Dangerous Liaisons”.

  92. Thanks for the correction, Sasha. Yes, of course, it was the “Jodie Foster” year in that rape movie. Very distasteful, disturbing film, I thought. After repeated viewings, I still think Glenn Close gave the Best Actress performance in 1988 for “Dangerous Liaisons”.

  93. FLASH!

    “Hollywood Hunter” now starring in “Banging Miss Daisy”.

    (Gotta love this column.)

  94. FLASH!

    “Hollywood Hunter” now starring in “Banging Miss Daisy”.

    (Gotta love this column.)

  95. When Sasha mentioned that the older, more established actresses all started on stage, it reminded me of what I don’t like most about the current crop of young actresses. None of them knows how to make a speech because they’ve never been on stage before and don’t know what to do without a script. Just think of all the recent Oscar speeches by the likes of Witherspoon, Portman, etc. They were all so boring, fake and awful. Streep always delivers a good winning speech.

  96. When Sasha mentioned that the older, more established actresses all started on stage, it reminded me of what I don’t like most about the current crop of young actresses. None of them knows how to make a speech because they’ve never been on stage before and don’t know what to do without a script. Just think of all the recent Oscar speeches by the likes of Witherspoon, Portman, etc. They were all so boring, fake and awful. Streep always delivers a good winning speech.

  97. Yeah, Meryl always delivers good and funny speeches.
    And if, and it’s still a big IF Viola Davis wins, we all know who made it possible. *gg*

    “My GOD somebody give her a movie!!!”

    SAG Awards 2009

    ;)

  98. Yeah, Meryl always delivers good and funny speeches.
    And if, and it’s still a big IF Viola Davis wins, we all know who made it possible. *gg*

    “My GOD somebody give her a movie!!!”

    SAG Awards 2009

    ;)

  99. Mitchell

    Streep’s role in the Manchurian Candidate was not well received? Nor her role in The Devil Wears Prada (the best thing about an average movie)? I am absolutely not a Streep fanboy, but your championing of Close (an absolutely phenomenal actress, I agree) is starting to get ridiculous. We get that Close has gone dark, but to belittle another actresses achievements is just wrong.

  100. Mitchell

    Streep’s role in the Manchurian Candidate was not well received? Nor her role in The Devil Wears Prada (the best thing about an average movie)? I am absolutely not a Streep fanboy, but your championing of Close (an absolutely phenomenal actress, I agree) is starting to get ridiculous. We get that Close has gone dark, but to belittle another actresses achievements is just wrong.

  101. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    I’ve said this before, but bears repeating: How is The Devil Wears Prada a dark role for Meryl Streep?

    Miranda Priestly demanded that her coffee be delivered promptly. She wasn’t boiling pet bunny rabbits alive on the kitchen stove.

    The Devil Wears Prada was a comedy. Nobody was plotting murder.

    That character is enormously sympathetic by the end of the film.

  102. Profile photo of Sasha Stone

    I’ve said this before, but bears repeating: How is The Devil Wears Prada a dark role for Meryl Streep?

    Miranda Priestly demanded that her coffee be delivered promptly. She wasn’t boiling pet bunny rabbits alive on the kitchen stove.

    The Devil Wears Prada was a comedy. Nobody was plotting murder.

    That character is enormously sympathetic by the end of the film.

  103. Mitchell

    It wasn’t particularly dark, but it was far from a sympathetic performance.
    Regardless, i was merely commenting on how Meryl’s “dark” performances (of which Sasha groups The Devil Wears Prada, even if she considers it in the middle) were supposedly not well received.
    And since when has “darkness” been an important factor in deciding the merit of a performance? It is true that the academy shy’s away from unlikable characters a majority of the time, but it seems as though Sasha is just as adverse to likable characters.

  104. Mitchell

    It wasn’t particularly dark, but it was far from a sympathetic performance.
    Regardless, i was merely commenting on how Meryl’s “dark” performances (of which Sasha groups The Devil Wears Prada, even if she considers it in the middle) were supposedly not well received.
    And since when has “darkness” been an important factor in deciding the merit of a performance? It is true that the academy shy’s away from unlikable characters a majority of the time, but it seems as though Sasha is just as adverse to likable characters.

  105. Camille

    I think the focus on acceptance speeches and how good or bad they are should be a little beside the point. Who cares if an actor isn’t good at speaking in front of millions of people? Meryl Streep wasn’t always the best at speeches either if you watch her old ones. I like the old days when the highlight of the awards was the name of the winner being called out and people would give brief speeches and get off the stage. Now there’s this pressure to deliver a lengthy, funny and emotional speech.

  106. Camille

    I think the focus on acceptance speeches and how good or bad they are should be a little beside the point. Who cares if an actor isn’t good at speaking in front of millions of people? Meryl Streep wasn’t always the best at speeches either if you watch her old ones. I like the old days when the highlight of the awards was the name of the winner being called out and people would give brief speeches and get off the stage. Now there’s this pressure to deliver a lengthy, funny and emotional speech.

  107. Tero Heikkinen

    Miranda is MOST of us (it’s a mockery of US). We live in this fucking shallow world, SHE says it out loud. We don’t like it.

    You will not fuck that fat girl next door? Will you?

  108. Tero Heikkinen

    Miranda is MOST of us (it’s a mockery of US). We live in this fucking shallow world, SHE says it out loud. We don’t like it.

    You will not fuck that fat girl next door? Will you?

  109. Not lengthy. Just funny or emotional. Or both. Ask Ty Burrell. Or Tina Fey.

  110. Not lengthy. Just funny or emotional. Or both. Ask Ty Burrell. Or Tina Fey.

  111. Bill W.

    @ Tero Heikkinen – The Academy thinks more thoroughly when giving out the Best Actress Oscar? Really? So I guess that’s why Judi Dench, Cate Blanchett, and Felicity Huffman have all won Best Actress Oscars, and Meryl Streep has finally won her second … oh, wait, I mispoke; I meant Helen Hunt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Reese Witherspoon, and Sandra Bullock.

  112. Bill W.

    @ Tero Heikkinen – The Academy thinks more thoroughly when giving out the Best Actress Oscar? Really? So I guess that’s why Judi Dench, Cate Blanchett, and Felicity Huffman have all won Best Actress Oscars, and Meryl Streep has finally won her second … oh, wait, I mispoke; I meant Helen Hunt, Gwyneth Paltrow, Reese Witherspoon, and Sandra Bullock.

  113. The Great Dane

    Yes, forget Hilary Swank robbing Imelda Staunton and Bullock robbing Streep. Gwyneth Paltrow beating Cate Blanchett in one of the best female performances ever is the ultimate Oscar joke!

  114. The Great Dane

    Yes, forget Hilary Swank robbing Imelda Staunton and Bullock robbing Streep. Gwyneth Paltrow beating Cate Blanchett in one of the best female performances ever is the ultimate Oscar joke!

  115. Tero Heikkinen

    Yes, but if you’re over 50, they don’t think about you… even thoroughly.

  116. Tero Heikkinen

    Yes, but if you’re over 50, they don’t think about you… even thoroughly.

  117. unlikelyhood

    Thanks for the correction Sasha.

    Bravo to Tero for that long-overdue breakdown of the difference between lead and supporting. True, and food for thought.

  118. unlikelyhood

    Thanks for the correction Sasha.

    Bravo to Tero for that long-overdue breakdown of the difference between lead and supporting. True, and food for thought.

  119. I feel a lot better about the Best Actress race this year than I did the last.

  120. I feel a lot better about the Best Actress race this year than I did the last.

  121. Great post! Thank you.

  122. Great post! Thank you.

  123. Glenn should have won for supporting in “Garp,” and for lead in either “Dangerous Liaisons” or “Fatal Attraction.”

    That said, I would love to see her win this year. Remember Geraldine Page winning at 62 for “The Trip to Bountiful?” She also beat Streep, deservedly so.

    And I wouldn’t count out Tilda Swinton this year either.

  124. Glenn should have won for supporting in “Garp,” and for lead in either “Dangerous Liaisons” or “Fatal Attraction.”

    That said, I would love to see her win this year. Remember Geraldine Page winning at 62 for “The Trip to Bountiful?” She also beat Streep, deservedly so.

    And I wouldn’t count out Tilda Swinton this year either.

  125. I see that you left out THE FIRST GRADER which was an Amazing film that came in second place to The King’s Speech at last year’s Toronto Film Festival. The male actor, Oliver Litondo was absolutely brilliant in it. Wish more people knew about it because it really was moving and inspirational. Even Whoopi loved it… check out what she had to say about it on The View: http://youtu.be/pXXGW-kDTO8

    Youtube Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-eBT7vnTLE

  126. I see that you left out THE FIRST GRADER which was an Amazing film that came in second place to The King’s Speech at last year’s Toronto Film Festival. The male actor, Oliver Litondo was absolutely brilliant in it. Wish more people knew about it because it really was moving and inspirational. Even Whoopi loved it… check out what she had to say about it on The View: http://youtu.be/pXXGW-kDTO8

    Youtube Trailer: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U-eBT7vnTLE

  127. It is really quite shameful sometimes when I drive by a marquee and the local cinema house shows asinine-sounding titles clearly targeted towards the average moviegoing public. God, did that sound harsh?

  128. It is really quite shameful sometimes when I drive by a marquee and the local cinema house shows asinine-sounding titles clearly targeted towards the average moviegoing public. God, did that sound harsh?

  129. While on the topic of Glenn Close, her brilliant performance in that Barbet Schroeder film as Sunny Von Bulow SHOULD have been recognized at least by a nomination. What a travesty. Her name was even eerily absent from the other major critics groups.

  130. While on the topic of Glenn Close, her brilliant performance in that Barbet Schroeder film as Sunny Von Bulow SHOULD have been recognized at least by a nomination. What a travesty. Her name was even eerily absent from the other major critics groups.

  131. Jessica Davis

    No actor or actress has ever been so overlooked as Glenn Close was for Dangerous Liasons. That could very well be the greatest performance of all time for any male or female actor. Yes, even better than any of Streep’s performances. I love Meryl Streep but that’s truth.

  132. both of them are great actresses..:)

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