Vancouver Critics Honor The Artist, Malick, Olsen, Fassbender

BEST FILM – The Artist

BEST ACTOR – Michael Fassbender, Shame

BEST ACTRESS – Elizabeth Olsen, Martha Marcy May Marlene

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR – Christopher Plummer, Beginners

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS – Jessica Chastain, The Tree of LIfe/Take Shelter/The Help

BEST DIRECTOR – Terrence Malick, The Tree of Life

BEST DOCUMENTARY – Cave of Forgotten Dreams

BEST SCREENPLAY – Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM – A Separation

BEST CANADIAN FILM – Cafe de flore

BEST ACTOR IN A CANADIAN FILM – Peter Stormare, Small Town Murder Songs

BEST ACTRESS IN A CANADIAN FILM – Michelle Williams, Take This Waltz

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A CANADIAN FILM – Viggo Mortensen, A Dangerous Method

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A CANADIAN FILM – Helene Florent, Cafe de flore

BEST DIRECTOR OF A CANADIAN FILM – David Cronenberg, A Dangerous Method

BEST BRITISH COLUMBIA FILM – People of a Feather

ACHIEVEMENT AWARD FOR CONTRIBUTION TO THE BC FILM AND TELEVISION INDUSTRY – Marv Newland

The Descendants, Malick Win Kansas City Film Critics!

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The Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Announce their Nominees

23 Comments

  1. Ryman
    January 10, 2012

    Christopher Plummer winning = NO GOOD

  2. Nichola
    January 10, 2012

    Someone needs to post the North Texas Critics Winners – they are in the forums ~

  3. Nichola
    January 10, 2012

    BEST PICTURE
    War Horse

    BEST DIRECTOR
    Martin Scorses / Hugo

    BEST ACTOR
    George Clooney / The Descendants

    BEST ACTRESS
    Viola Davis / The Help

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
    Christopher Plummer / Beginners

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
    Octavia Spencer / The Help

    BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
    Janusz Kainski / War Horse

    BEST ANIMATED
    The Adventures of Tin Tin

    BEST DOCUMENTARY
    Being Elmo

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
    A Separation (Persian: جدایی نادر از سیمین,Jodái-e Náder az Simin)

    Source: http://www.northtexasfilmcritics.com…from-the-ntfca

  4. steve50
    January 10, 2012

    Lovin’ the Vancouver selections (must be the hometown air).

    North Texas – not so much.

  5. Heath87
    January 10, 2012

    North Texas= Spielberg Fuckers…

  6. January 10, 2012

    Now that Vancouver also awarded The Tree of Life in Best Director, Terrence Malick has as many awards (8) as the frontrunner, Michel Hazanavicius does.

    This was also the fifth and fourth award for Fassbender and Olsen respectively, both have more wins at the moment than supposed frontrunners Pitt (3) and Streep (3), although they do have big wins for sure (both Streep and Pitt won the prestigious NYFCC and Pitt even took NSFC). But still…Fassbender has Los Angeles AND 4 other awards…

    What I don’t get is how could the critics groups go apeshit over ‘The Artist’ (it won the most bp-awards to date this season) and NOT embrace Dujardin and Bejo who have only won 2-2 awards so far…of the 26 already announced.

    Anyway, here is the updated chart : http://awardscorner.blogspot.com/2011/12/2011-awards-summary-chart.html

  7. January 10, 2012

    Will a bad box office affect The Artist’s ability to win the best picture Oscar or will it be like The Hurt Locker where a poor audience turnout does not matter?

    War Horse only got a PGA nomination from the guilds which makes its chances of winning the best picture Oscar bleak.

  8. Heath87
    January 10, 2012

    I’m sensing a The Artist vs. The Descendants battle for the final gold…

    P.S. But…what about the Denver Film Critics..?? They should have announced their winners by this time…

  9. Tero Heikkinen
    January 10, 2012

    The Artist is an Oscar film. It will make its money in the coming weeks. This has been just warmup still. Without the Oscar buzz it would not be a huge hit, but only a moderate one. It will soon be big worldwide. I think 100 million easily, but 200 million even.

    It goes wide in USA after the Oscar nominations, and then it will be released all over the world (where it has not yet been). Late February / early March in most countries.

    So far it has only made 26 million, but it has not cost more than 15M to make. We are looking at a very profitable film when all is said and done.

  10. Ryman
    January 10, 2012

    North Texas made MUCH BETTER selections than Vancouver did.

  11. Jonny
    January 10, 2012

    Pretty fantastic choices they made up in Vancouver. I would take those.

  12. January 10, 2012

    Thanks Sean

    North Texas Film Critics Winners!

    BEST PICTURE
    ?? (Go to Sean’s blog, TheScreenTeen, to find out. Only fair he should get some page views too)

    BEST DIRECTOR
    Martin Scorsese / Hugo

    BEST ACTOR
    George Clooney / The Descendants

    BEST ACTRESS
    Viola Davis / The Help

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
    Christopher Plummer / Beginners

    BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
    Octavia Spencer / The Help

    BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
    Janusz Kainski / War Horse

    BEST ANIMATED
    The Adventures of Tin Tin

    BEST DOCUMENTARY
    Being Elmo

    BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
    A Separation (Persian: جدایی نادر از سیمین,Jodái-e Náder az Simin)

    [ ^ respect! for giving the the title for A Separation in Persian too. The New York Times didn't even do that. ]

  13. Mel
    January 10, 2012

    After all the hype, I excitedly put in Martha Marcy May Marlene fully expecting to by wowed by Olsen and I wasn’t, at all. I didn’t get a darn thing from her performance. Just like after I watched Drive, I was left really confused and having to think about what in the hell I must be missing.

  14. Nate
    January 10, 2012

    Sasha has mentioned before about movies winning sometimes because they are the most different of the nominees. The idea being that movies with similar targets split their votes. I obviously have no idea how that might, if at all, play out this year. And this isn’t my pained rationalization of how the movie I prefer might win. This is just a thought experiment, sort of.
    I’ve noticed a couple of trends this year. And they’re a little related. One being the ‘feel-good’ movie and that applies even to movies with very sad parts. Those bitter-sweet movies still leave you feeling . . . . better afterwards. Two movies I haven’t seen, but I’m including in this thought process are War Horse and Extremely Loud. I don’t expect either of those movies to win, but I expect them to receive votes from Ampas Members. Also, if I don’t list a movie, it isn’t necessarily because I don’t think it deserves consideration, I just don’t know enough about it or something maybe.

    Feel Good/ Bitter Sweet (Uplifting?):
    Midnight In Paris
    The Artist
    Moneyball
    The Descendants
    War Horse
    Hugo
    EL&IC
    HP8
    The Help
    Tree of Life
    Bridesmaids?

    Feel bad (You know what I mean):
    Dragon Tattoo
    Melancholia
    Drive
    Tinker, Tailor
    J. Edgar
    Shame
    Take Shelter
    A Separation?
    A Dangerous Method
    We Need to Talk about Kevin
    Margin Call
    The Ides of March
    Young Adult?

    I really don’t know:
    50/50 (ironic right? it could go either way!)
    My Week with Marylyn.

    Of the eventual 7 or 8 nominees for BP there’s a very good chance only one film from feel bad gets nominated. I don’t think that by itself could possibly be enough to win it for one of those, but it does make that film stand out. Obviously a film Like Tree of Life will stand out for it’s own reasons regardless of what any one persons opinion of it is, whether that’s enough for a nomination can’t be known yet. Either way it’s the year of feel good movies. Why? because people’s lives suck right now. They want to feel good when they go to the movie. That’s fine. That’s why The Kings Speech won last year. It was the best movie that made people feel good.

    That’s certainly not the only trend I’ve noticed. In a very related way, psychologically, there’s been a hefty dose of nostalgia floating around. And a ton of movies not set in present day. One film is especially worth noting, with a caveat, is Midnight in Paris because it deals with the concept directly and it makes a fantastic point, but still, it is still going to hit the right notes for people with a soft spot for the twenties. I think it, along with Hugo and The Artist, feed into that nostalgia the most. They don’t have a monopoly on it though, even Tree of Life, I noticed watching it with my dad, there was a certain sense of nostalgia for him remembering his own childhood.

    Not all of these films are ‘nostalgic’ films, they just take place in some other when.

    early 20th Century
    A Dangerous Method
    War Horse
    The Artist
    Hugo
    Midnight in Paris (I know it takes place in modern day)

    Mid Century
    The Help
    Tree of Life (most of it)
    Tinker Tailor
    J. Edgar
    My Week with Marylyn

    Turn of the Millennium (not that anyone is nostalgic about then really, it’s just interesting.)
    Dragon Tattoo
    Moneyball
    EL&IC

    I don’t think there’s any way of knowing how any of this will affect anything, it’s just interesting. Oddly, I think the Descendants is possibly the least nostalgic film because it’s about the future (i don’t mean it takes place in the future, the concerns of the movie are about the future) Moneyball a little bit too. A lot of films are not really nostalgic or anti nostalgic.
    I do think that Midnight in Paris, Hugo and The Artist have a large overlap in ‘target audience’ which isn’t to say other people don’t really love those movies, but I think all other things being equal there’s a population that would prefer those three movies because of the nostalgia factor. Also the French thing I just noticed about them. That’s weird.
    As an experiment lets say (and I don’t know exactly every detail of exactly how this voting works so I’ll try to frame this in a way that would apply to any system in a vague way) lets go with a top 5 on all the ballots and something like 70 percent of voters put one of those three on their ballots and 40% put all three. Lets say one of Moneyball and The Descendants are on 50% of ballots with 30% having both then the Help is on like 40% of the ballots. That leaves us one or two outsiders. If it’s a dark film, it will be the only one of the lot. if said dark film is on 40% of the ballots, a majority of those ballots might be something like 3 or 4 darker films and 1 or 2 lighter films (possibly) whereas the other ballots are 3 or 4 feel goods and one or two feel bads. That discrepancy helps the darker film in a couple of ways. The feel-good heavy have a better chance of it’s one darker vote helping the only darker film than the one feel-good vote on the feel-bad ballots all helping the same feel-good movie (of six) also with the nostalgic trio (two of which are front runners) the voter can only put one 1st, what if the split is more or less even or 35-35-30 of first places, if the darker movie gets on 40% ballots it’s maybe 15% first places. The Artist might only have 20% first places if it gets first place on 35% of ballots with all three films and a percentage of ballots with one or none of the other two.
    I still think artist is the film to beat, but always be wary of the one film that is most unlike the other 6 or 7.

  15. Nate
    January 10, 2012

    That being said sweet for Fassbender.

  16. Munro202
    January 10, 2012

    These awards always make me happy to be from Vancouver – not my first choices but great ones nonetheless!

  17. JJ
    January 10, 2012

    Clooney: better in Up in the Air, but deserving. Fassbender – the rock and roll choice whose performance more people will talk about in the next few years. Right now, only very discerning moviegoers and penis afficiondos have seen Shame.

  18. JJ
    January 10, 2012

    I meant penis aficionados. Spell check after the fact.

  19. MikeScott
    January 10, 2012

    Very nice for Fassbender, Olsen, and Williams (I can’t wait for Take This Waltz to be released here).

  20. Keifer
    January 10, 2012

    These are decent selections.

    I’m not sure to which blog site this comment belongs, but:

    I just saw “Taking Shelter” and:

    Michael Shannon’s meltdown is truly an acting feat – the most brilliant piece of acting I’ve seen all year, and it is matched by
    Jessica Chastain’s marvelously controlled anger and deep love for her husband which shines through.

    Both of these performances just blew me away in a film I’m still trying to sort out in my head. I love it when I’m not spoonfed themes in a film, but rather have to sift through to determine the meaning behind the scenes.

    “Take Shelter” is one of the most underrated films of the year. A classic that will stand the test of time.

    And for my money, Shannon and Chastain give career-defining performances that are miles ahead of others in their categories.

    I encourage all the readers out there to check out this film . . . everyone must see these two performances. Absolutely stunning acting by both.

  21. Odee
    January 11, 2012

    Got to agree, Keifer. Shannon was superb. But I for one am not surprised, given his brave and wonderful turn, along with Ashley Judd in Bug. The only performance that comes close in my opinion, although I loved Chastain, but for my money, the best female performance of the year is Olivia Coleman, who gives a clinic in emotional breakdown done brilliantly and will surely be ignored for all of the big names. That’s the way it goes, but Shannon may just get in, given people know him and he was recently nominated, so that helps and we KNOW Chastain is in for something or other and probably will actually Win Supporting Actress this year.

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