Russell Crowe looking righteous as Noah

19 comments

  1. Patricia Scarpin 3 years ago

    I’m looking foward to seeing Crowe directed by Aronofsky.

    Like Dislike
  2. Spout 3 years ago

    Crowe lookin’ like he’s gonna be the usual Crowe, and that ain’t a bad thing.

    Like Dislike
  3. kjbacon 3 years ago

    ‘Based on the startling true story’

    Like Dislike
  4. zazou 3 years ago

    Crowe has invented some interesting movie characters,Hando, Maximus, John Nash,Captain Aubrey, James Braddock,and Ben Wade.I like this actor and the parts he has played and I am interested in his interpretation of Noah.So which charater is the usual Crowe,the Roman General, the skinhead neo-Nazi,the 18th century ship captain,the 20th century boxer,the 19th century bandit…other..?The Greenland location is appropriately intimidating. Aronofsky and Crowe have the skill to make this memorable.

    Like Dislike
  5. murtaza 3 years ago

    Someone get this actor another OSCAR, he was badly robbed for A BEAUTIFUL MIND.

    Like Dislike
  6. murtaza 3 years ago

    why is this being released in MARCH??? bad time for movies.

    Like Dislike
  7. Frank 3 years ago

    Of course he was robbed in A Beautiful Mind. Get him in the race again, and fast!!!!!!!!!!!

    Like Dislike
  8. Melissa 3 years ago

    It’d be great if Russell Crowe can pull off a Heath ledger Brokeback Mountain style performance. Totally out of his comfort zone, a guaranteed 2nd Oscar!! :-)

    Like Dislike
  9. rufussondheim 3 years ago

    It wouldn’t surprise me if he got a second Oscar this year for playing Javert. It’s a bit of a one-dimensional character as written (Just because he’s so steadfast in his version of morality) but when he gets to that final song of his, Stars, he could knock that thing out of the park in ways lesser actors can only dream.

    And you know how I feel about the likelihood of Les Miz sweeping if it’s as good as I suspect it could be.

    Like Dislike
  10. SeattleMoviegoer 3 years ago

    just read a piece on this in USA TODAY that listed this as a March 2014 release. could be a typo.

    Like Dislike
  11. steve50 3 years ago

    ^ I saw the same ting on another film site. If it’s true, we all know March is a dumping ground, which doesn’t look good for this.

    Like Dislike
  12. rufussondheim 3 years ago

    March is not a dumping ground necessarily. There’s usually one or two big films in March that make it big. This year’s instance was The Hunger Games. Past winners include 300 and Alice in Wonderland.

    Not everything has to be John Carter.

    Like Dislike
  13. zazou 3 years ago

    Yes that is true March is not a dumping ground for so/so films. Actually that is an excellent scheduling as Easter and Passover arrive in Spring.This Aronofsky film is looking really interesting and Crowe is an excellent Noah choice.

    Like Dislike
  14. steve50 3 years ago

    Ok, “dumping ground” may be harsh, but 1st quarter months are the traditionally lowest BP of the year. Hunger Games is an obvious exception, not the rule, and maybe that’s the strategy with Noah. The whole “based on the bestseller” thing.

    I’m sure Aronofsky is going to do some amazing things with this. The sky is the limit, literally, for his great visual imagination and, as long as the script doesn’t remind one of bricks falling off the back of a truck, it should be good.

    Like Dislike
  15. Yogsss 3 years ago

    My favorite actor of all time. I’m glad he’s back on the game with a great director on hand.

    Like Dislike
  16. rufussondheim 3 years ago

    I just don’t see the story of Noah being particularly interesting. It’s a story that’s practically as old as the sea and there’s very little in the way of latitude one can have with the story.

    The only aspect that’s interesting to me, and one that’s never been explored to the best of my knowledge is the after effects of the flood on the psychology of Noah and his family. To see the overwhelming destruction, to try and rebuild life and society at the conclusion of the flood, well that’s interesting to me. But I doubt that’s what we’ll get.

    Like Dislike
  17. julian the emperor 3 years ago

    The greatest retelling of the Noah legend? Go for Julian Barnes’ supremely witty first chapter in his comic masterpiece “Ten and a half chapters about the history of the world” (for those who don’t know this brilliant British author I would strongly recommend his 1988 breakthrough novel Flaubert’s Parrot as well as his “death memoir”, Nothing to be Frightened of and his latest, the 2011 Man Booker Prize winning novel, The Sense of an Ending).

    Like Dislike
  18. steve50 3 years ago

    Julian Barnes IS brilliant, julian!

    “there’s very little in the way of latitude one can have with the story.”

    Excellent point, rufussondheim – build the boat, get on the boat, bob around on the boat, get off the boat.

    They need to add some subplots, like the two gay giraffes that weren’t allowed on the boat, the elephants that spread horrific stories about the donkeys to get them thrown overboard, and the cougars that chased Noah’s sons around on deck.

    (spoiler) We know the giraffes survived because they were sold to Oliver Reed n Gladiator:

    http://movie-sounds.net/film/Gladiator/258/

    Like Dislike
  19. rufussondheim 3 years ago

    Yeah, I’ve been wanting to read Julian Barnes for awhile, but it keeps getting knocked down the list by something newer and more shiny. Sense of an Ending is so short, I could knock it down in a day or two easily (although I have heard that you should really read it twice before you form an opinion of it.)

    Like Dislike

Sign In

Register

Reset Your Password

Email Newsletter