Share

The DGA to Announce January 8th, no Oscar Overlap

An interesting development for Oscar watchers happened tonight when the DGA announced it will deliver its nominations January 8th. The Oscar nominations will come two days later but there will be no overlap, meaning, no overriding influence of the DGA on Oscar.

By contrast, last year DGA nominations came out on January 9 and Oscar ballots CLOSED on January 3.

So this is how it’s going to go down:

January 3 – PGA nominations
January 3 – Oscar ballots close
January 8 – DGA nominations
January  10 – Oscar nominations

Therefore, there will be NO direct influence by the DGA or the PGA on nominations. This should be a very interesting Oscar year.  It will be a true guessing game, not a gimme.

10 Comments on this Post

  1. It just seems like an awful lot of trouble these moves are being made that’s gonna mess up everybody else. Are the oscars that afraid of the Globes? Because that seems to be the primary target of these moves…

  2. Tero Heikkinen

    Predictability. I understand the Academy here. It must not be fun to have a clear frontrunner when someone has won every other award in just recent days. And many award shows are basically just trying to predict the future Oscar winner, so that they can claim being there first and get name for themselves (Won Oscar, Golden Globe, SAG, ???). Globes are particularly notorious for that.

  3. The BFCA tweeted about that on Oscar night, Tero. They wanted all their followers to notice just how closely the Academy had aligned with them – how influential they must have been and how valid this made their choices. As if their asinine choices weren’t shallow enough to begin with.

  4. In a perfect world, all the critics circles, guilds and award-giving bodies would announce on the same day. Only then could you be certain what each considered to be their true favorite, with no influence given or taken.

    Broadcast it election style, starting at Greenwich time with the Baftas, then working west to NY and Boston critics, across the continent through cities that have their own critics groups, and ending with the oscars in LA. Great single night viewing on TV.

    Of course, that would cut back on the season’s revenue considerably. Since the purpose of these awards is primarily to generate business – not necessarily determine the best of anything – it’ll never happen. The avoidance of award fatigue appears to be the goal and the avoidance of influence just a charade.

  5. It’s good news for me. The earlier the better.
    I always start to get punchy around the 1st December,usually around the NBR or first top ten from Travers and Co.

  6. Tero Heikkinen

    Yup, the earlier, the better. So sick of all these Dec. 25th release dates (Les Mis etc…). “Oh, you wanted to release your film on Christmas Day? That is the reason? How lovely.”

    I salute serious Oscar contenders (like The Master) that are put out before October (the latest). A year consists of 12 months. Surprising fact that may be, but it’s true.

    You know… if studios made a little test, and decided together that they – for once – released three of their year’s best films (per studio) during the Summer months and some of their worst dumped for Christmas… meaning, if all studios did that, the future Oscar winner would be a Summer film. It’s not really Academy members’ fault that it goes like it goes.

  7. Mikhail Shurygin

    Hobbit trailer in youtube!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yYz0JWJioOM

  8. So glad for the early nominations! I can’t stand the waiting in January, it drives me crazy. I like the changes everyone is making.

  9. Wait, I’m confused. You say that “last year DGA nominations came out on January 9 and Oscar ballots CLOSED on January 3.”

    This year, DGA noms are on the 8th and Oscar ballots also close on the 3rd, with noms on the 10th. So how is that any real difference?

Leave a Comment

Warning: Do not abuse your right to comment here. You will be deleted.