Lincoln Leads Vancouver Film Critics

BEST FILM
Lincoln
The Master
Zero Dark Thirty

BEST ACTOR
Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln
John Hawkes, The Sessions
Joaquin Phoenix, The Master

BEST ACTRESS
Jessica Chastain, Zero Dark Thirty
Marion Cotillard, Rust and Bone
Jennifer Lawrence, Silver Linings Playbook

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Philip Seymour Hoffman, The Master
Tommy Lee Jones, Lincoln
Christoph Waltz, Django Unchained

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Amy Adams, The Master
Anne Hathaway, Les Misérables
Helen Hunt, The Sessions

BEST DIRECTOR
Kathryn Bigelow, Zero Dark Thirty
Ang Lee, Life of Pi
Steven Spielberg, Lincoln

BEST SCREENPLAY
Mark Boal, Zero Dark Thirty
Tony Kushner, Lincoln
Quentin Tarantino, Django Unchained

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Amour
Holy Motors
The Intouchables

BEST DOCUMENTARY
Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry
How to Survive a Plague
Searching for Sugar Man
CANADIAN NOMINEES INCLUDE TWO-TIME WINNER DAVID CRONENBERG, SARAH POLLEY AND VANCOUVER-BASED FILMMAKER PANOS COSMATOS

Having secured five nominations, David Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis will compete with Kim Nguyen’s Rebelle and Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tell for Best Canadian Film. A previous winner of Best Director for Eastern Promises and A Dangerous Method, Cronenberg will compete with Polley and Vancouver’s Panos Cosmatos of Beyond the Black Rainbow for the award this year.

Cosmopolis’ Robert Pattinson faces competition from Beyond the Black Rainbow’s Michael Rogers and Laurence Anyways’ Melvil Poupaud for Best Actor. Laurence Anyways’ Suzanne Clément is similarly nominated for Best Actress, a category in which she’s joined by Liverpool’s Stéphanie Lapointe and Rebelle’s Rachel Mwanza.

For the first time, the Vancouver Film Critics Circle will present an award for Best Canadian Documentary. The nominees are Peter Mettler’s The End of Time, Polley’s Stories We Tell and Nisha Pahuja’s The World Before Her.

Joining Cosmatos’ Beyond the Black Rainbow in the running for Best British Columbia Film are Jesse James Miller’s Becoming RedwoodMark Sawers’ Camera Shy and Katrin Bowen’s Random Acts of Romance.

A full list of nominees in the Canadian category follows.

BEST CANADIAN FILM
Cosmopolis

Rebelle
Stories We Tell

BEST ACTOR IN A CANADIAN FILM
Robert Pattinson, Cosmopolis

Melvil Poupaud, Laurence Anyways
Michael Rogers, 
Beyond the Black Rainbow

BEST ACTRESS IN A CANADIAN FILM

Suzanne Clément, Laurence Anyways
Stéphanie Lapointe, 
Liverpool
Rachel Mwanza, 
Rebelle

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR IN A CANADIAN FILM

Jay Baruchel, Goon
Serge Kanyinda, 
Rebelle
Liev Schreiber, 
Goon

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS IN A CANADIAN FILM
Sarah Gadon, Cosmopolis

Samantha Morton, Cosmopolis
Alison Pill, 
Goon

BEST DIRECTOR OF A CANADIAN FILM

Panos Cosmatos, Beyond the Black Rainbow
David Cronenberg, 
Cosmopolis
Sarah Polley, 
Stories We Tell

BEST CANADIAN DOCUMENTARY

The End of Time
Stories We Tell

The World Before Her

BEST BRITISH COLUMBIA FILM
Becoming Redwood

Beyond the Black Rainbow
Camera Shy

Random Acts of Romance

17 Comments on this Post

  1. USA Today’s best movies of 2012 (alphabetical) from Claudia Puig, the usual suspects,with one BIG omission:

    Argo: Director Ben Affleck’s real-life thriller – six American Embassy workers in Tehran escape being taken hostage in 1979 and masquerade as a B-movie crew to leave Iran is so crazy it could have been fiction. Performances ring astoundingly true, from well-known actors such as Alan Arkin and John Goodman to the unfamiliar faces of the Embassy workers and Iranian guards. Brilliantly fusing suspense and dark comedy, Argo should be at the top of everyone’s must-see list.

    Beasts of the Southern Wild: Shot in Louisiana with non-professional actors, the year’s best art house film is tender and resplendent. This vivid look at a little girl coping with an ailing father and a life-threatening storm is a gorgeous blend of imaginative fable and aching realism, with a stand-out performance by then-5-year-old Quvenzhan Wallis.

    Django Unchained: One of director Quentin Tarantino’s best films, this sprawling and stunningly photographed tale of antebellum empowerment is wildly entertaining, with stand-out performances by Samuel L. Jackson, Christoph Waltz, Jamie Foxx, Leonardo DiCaprio and Kerry Washington.

    Frankenweenie: A heartfelt love story between a boy and his dog, as told through the offbeat lens of director Tim Burton. The year’s top animated film makes great use of stop-motion technology, pays tribute to classic horror films and comments on the vagaries of science and those who fear its advance

    Les Miz: A first-rate adaptation of the long-running stage musical with Hugh Jackman in his best screen role as Jean Valjean, the prisoner who turns his life around through the love of an adopted child. Anne Hathaway is splendid as the tragic Fantine. Director Tom Hooper artfully expands the musical beyond the limitations of a stage production and intensifies its powerful emotional message.

    Life of Pi: Director Ang Lee exquisitely translates Yann Martell’s novel about a boy stranded in a lifeboat on the Pacific Ocean with a menacing tiger. A visual feast that leaves a lasting impression, it makes superb use of 3-D technology and features a notable debut by then-17-year-old Suraj Sharma.

    Lincoln: A magnificently compelling historical thriller fashioned by director Steven Spielberg and writer Tony Kushner. The film focuses on the last months of the 16th president’s life and his dogged efforts to outlaw slavery. Daniel Day-Lewis is masterful as Abraham Lincoln and the supporting cast shines.

    Moonrise Kingdom: This beguiling, lyrical and drolly eccentric comedy about a pair of 12-year-olds in love is director Wes Anderson’s best film since 1998’s Rushmore. Performances by Frances McDormand, Bill Murray and Ed Norton are topnotch and Bruce Willis has never been better.

    Safety Not Guaranteed: A delightful low-tech time-travel thriller that features a sweetly funny romance between two likable oddballs (Aubrey Plaza and Mark Duplass). It has more wit and charm than a pack of Hollywood blockbusters.

    Searching for Sugar Man: A marvel of storytelling, this enthralling documentary is a quasi-thriller that focuses on an obscure Detroit singer-songwriter who unknowingly struck a chord across the globe in apartheid-era South Africa.

  2. It’s just me or David Cronenberg gets a nomination to these awards automatically? Seems like the GG with musicals.

  3. The Master.
    PTA.
    Phoenix.
    Hoffman.
    Adams.
    <3

  4. Suzanne Clément is the best performance I’ve seen on a ballot this year. Laurence Anyways is better than both Rebelle and Cosmopolis imo.

  5. I’m looking forward to War Witch, if I ever get to see it! But Laurence Anyways was a dirge. And Cosmopolis is dreadful.

    The Canadian portions of this group’s awards are so predictable, and not very inspiring.

  6. I keep trying to figure out all the love for The Master. Has anyone noticed that this total dud of a lack of interest film has just died at the box office? There are great films and there are popular films. This overstuffed, self-indulgent pastiche of ego ridden blather is neither.

  7. Danemychal

    I’m mostly pissed that The Master releases so late on Blu-ray (after the Oscars) despite releasing in theaters definitely early enough to come out in time. Argo was an actual box office success, came out later than The Master, and will still be released in time for the Oscars. I never got to see The Master; it was only in Omaha for one week. This is a travesty, I tell you!

  8. Danemychal,

    Sorry you have to wait so long, but you can look forward to seeing one of the most important films of the year.

    If I was offered a chance to see one of two movies — titles unknown — and was told one of them was among the top 5 best-reviewed American movies of 2012 and the other one was #1 at the box-office with Christmas Day crowds, I know which one I’d be most excited to see.

  9. rufussondheim
  10. ^ Great site. I enjoy watching it morph and there’s not much missing (if anything). Good archive.

  11. So happy for BEYOND THE BLACK RAINBOW! I absolutely adore that film and am thrilled to see Vancouver and Toronto recognize one of the year’s best Canadian films.

  12. #9 Silver Linings Playbook
    #15 Looper
    #18 The Dark Knight Rises
    #20 The Perks of Being a Wallflower
    #22 The Cabin in the Woods
    #23 The Avengers
    #25 Cosmopolis
    #26 Les Miserables
    #29 Cloud Atlas

    …all higher than…

    #31 The Loneliest Planet
    #37 Killer Joe
    #39 Keep the Lights On
    #40 Wuthering Heights
    #41 The Imposter
    #45 Barbara
    #46 The Impossible
    #48 Elena

    Never trust a critic!

  13. I really like the idea of three nominees per category. That means the losing nominees could rightly be referred to as “runners up.”

  14. Oh Matt, you’re very bad… Kkkkkkkkkk

  15. I might only care because I’m from Vancouver, but if anyone else is interested, top 10 lists from Jay Stone and my favourite film critic, Katherine Monk:

    http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/movie-guide/Stone+movies+2012/7751232/story.html

    http://www.vancouversun.com/entertainment/movie-guide/Katherine+Monk+movies+2012/7751234/story.html

  16. “#18 The Dark Knight Rises
    #22 The Cabin in the Woods
    #23 The Avengers

    …all higher than…
    #31 The Loneliest Planet
    #37 Killer Joe
    #39 Keep the Lights On
    #40 Wuthering Heights
    #41 The Imposter
    #45 Barbara
    #46 The Impossible
    #48 Elena”

    You say that as if it were a BAD thing. :)

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