Share

Thirsty trailer for Jason Reitman’s Men, Women & Children

As Sasha noted yesterday, Jason Reitman’s Men, Women & Children will open on Oct 3 and goes wide on Oct 17, soon after it screens at TIFF. In this trailer it comes across as an intriguing descendant of The Ice Storm and American Beauty, recalibrated to measure the emotional effects of our electronic tools, the hide and seek of social media in the age of online relationships.

“Men, Women & Children” follows the story of a group of high school teenagers and their parents as they attempt to navigate the many ways the internet has changed their relationships, their communication, their self-image, and their love lives. The film attempts to stare down social issues such as video game culture, anorexia, infidelity, fame hunting, and the proliferation of illicit material on the internet. As each character and each relationship is tested, we are shown the variety of roads people choose – some tragic, some hopeful – as it becomes clear that no one is immune to this enormous social change that has come through our phones, our tablets, and our computers. Based on on Chad Kultgen’s novel of the same name.

16 Comments on this Post

  1. UBourgeois

    That digital overlay format has me nervous. I dunno if the trailer was making a point of showing it off or what, but if it’s really that ubiquitous throughout the entire film, it could get very annoying very fast. Still interested in seeing the final product, though.

  2. Bryce Forestieri

    LOL. My God. The screencap you chose.

    Genius casting?

  3. It kind of reminds me of that movie Disconnect, but the technology looks even more prominent in it. I think it looks great. What a cast.

  4. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    “That digital overlay format has me nervous.”

    Same thing that first turned me off the new incarnation of Sherlock 4 years ago (and Sherlock was the first place I ever saw the gimmick utilized). I eventually made myself overlook the gimmick for the sake of Benedict Cumberbatch, and I make myself overlook the same gimmick for the sake of Fincher and Spacey on House of Cards where it’s a ubiquitous gimmick there too.

    Maybe at some point we’ll be forced to swallow the gimmick as a new form of punctuation in film grammar, but for now it still looks like a gimmick to me which is why I keep using the word gimmick in this comment.

    The movie obviously wants to make a point that screen-life saturates real-life interactions but I’m not sure I’m ready to see floaty screen-life dialogues hovering around like cartoon thought-bubbles in big-screen movies all the time.

    I suppose this might look like a really jazzy new doodad to older Academy voters who’ve never seen Sherlock or House of Cards.

    Other than my resistance to that, though, this does look great.

  5. Ángel Ramos

    Love the “I feel love” cover…

  6. hoping a nominatio for jennifer garner!!!!!

  7. UBourgeois

    Second observation – Is Adam Sandler not as major in this film as we might have thought? For the first-billed actor, he’s not very present in this trailer.

  8. Richard B

    I’m hesitant to speak about the film’s chances because Reitman’s last two films did not enter the race at all, but this seems noticeably different. Anyway, if it’s as good ad Young Adult was, I have to see it.

  9. Bryce Forestieri

    Adam Sandler as a creepy/”normal” guy looking for escorts online is pretty much spot-on casting. At times, I even have trouble buying his performance in PUNCH DRUNK LOVE, but this…this might be his Charlton Heston in THE BIG COUNTRY moment — that is to say the role he was born to play, the only role.

  10. Thirsty is a great adjective for this trailer.

  11. Chris Price

    “it comes across as an intriguing descendant of The Ice Storm and American Beauty, recalibrated to measure the emotional effects of our electronic tools”

    That is EXACTLY what it is. Sandler is very, very good, but I’d put him and virtually everyone else in the film in the Supporting category because it really is an ensemble film. With regards to the “gimmick” discussed above, I really, really enjoyed how it is used in the film. Particularly the way it is employed to help navigate the emotional landscape of the teenage characters. I know its been done before, but this is one of the few times I felt that it may really be a legitimate new tool in film communication. My two knocks on this movie are:

    1) The framing device used to punctuate the themes of the film (it involves a satellite and Emma Thompson’s clinical, Little Children-esque narration) gets a little too on-the-nose and sledgehammer-y for my tastes.

    2) I had a major problem with Jennifer Garner’s character (namely, that the character veers too much in to cartoon villainy).

    But given that there is so much up on screen, its hard to dwell on those issues. Dean Norris is absolutely wonderful in the film, as is Judy Greer in a very tough role. Reitman is definitely aiming to make the American Beauty of the social media age, and he gets damn close to doing it. Its about as good as Juno and Thank You For Smoking, but I like Up In The Air and Young Adult better. I think the Academy will avoid it like the plague because of all the explicit sexual frankness which turned off many audience members at my screening, but perhaps they plan on toning that aspect down. But I think discerning moviegoers will find a lot to love here, so whether or not the Oscar machine smiles on Reitman this time, I’m confident in saying he’s delivered a fine film that I wouldn’t exactly call a return to form, but rather another interesting new direction in a career that has already found him trying a myriad of styles and tones.

  12. Winston

    It feels very David Fincher-ish to me. It might be a good thing!

  13. Watermelons

    “Maybe at some point we’ll be forced to swallow the gimmick as a new form of punctuation in film grammar,”

    NEW, Ryan??! so this is what it feels like to be trolled into fury on awards daily..

    – Watermelons

  14. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    At times, I even have trouble buying his performance in PUNCH DRUNK LOVE, but this…this might be his Charlton Heston in THE BIG COUNTRY moment — that is to say the role he was born to play, the only role.

    This might be the most insightful comment of the week, Bryce. THE BIG COUNTRY has always been one of my favorite westerns — precisely because it’s one of the very first anti-westerns. Wyler’s revisionist sensibilities must have felt as alien and incomprehensible to 1958 audiences as Hitchcock’s Vertigo felt the same year.

    Charleton Heston didn’t want to be a part of THE BIG COUNTRY because it was obvious to him that he wouldn’t be the “star” — he was 4 or 5 rungs down from the lead characters.

    But you’re right — it’s his best performance, and suits his true personality better than anything else he ever did in his otherwise bloated career of self-important roles.

  15. Profile photo of Ryan Adams

    “Charleton” ? ha. of course, I mean Charlatan Heston.

  16. Bryce Forestieri

    You mean to tell me, Ryan, I’m not the only one who’s reimagined GRAVITY as a PLANET OF THE APES prequel. After Dr. Stone swims and drags her way out the lake and starts her magnificent hike, about two miles inland she’d encounter a village…in my mind it wasn’t Moses anymore.

    I’m sure, though, there are other films, like that one from 1968, which nevertheless work, despite of him.

    …or Chris Hemsworth

    wait

    why’s it have to be one protagonist? both Hemsworths

Leave a Comment