BAFTA

bafta

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts have announced the dates for the next three years of the EE British Academy Awards.

The 2016 EE British Academy Film Awards will air on Sunday February 14. The 2017 will take place on February 12, 2017 and the 2018 awards will take place on Sunday February 18.

The EE British Academy of Film and Television Arts take place at the Royal Opera House in London. The awards air on BBC in the UK and on BBC America in the USA.

This year’s recipients included: Eddie Redmayne, J.K. Simmons, Julianne Moore and Patricia Arquette who all went on to win Academy Awards for their roles.

The BAFTA Los Angeles Britannia Awards ceremony will take place on Friday, October 30 this year at the Beverly Hilton Hotel in Los Angeles.

patricia-arquette-boyhood

BEST FILM

  • BOYHOOD Richard Linklater, Cathleen Sutherland

DIRECTOR

  • BOYHOOD Richard Linklater

LEADING ACTRESS

  • JULIANNE MOORE Still Alice

LEADING ACTOR

  • EDDIE REDMAYNE The Theory of Everything

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • PATRICIA ARQUETTE Boyhood

SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • J.K. SIMMONS Whiplash

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Anthony McCarten

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Wes Anderson

EDITING

  • WHIPLASH Tom Cross

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING James Marsh, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

  • STEPHEN BERESFORD (Writer), DAVID LIVINGSTONE (Producer) Pride

CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • BIRDMAN Emmanuel Lubezki

PRODUCTION DESIGN

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Adam Stockhausen, Anna Pinnock

COSTUME DESIGN

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Milena Canonero

ORIGINAL MUSIC

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Alexandre Desplat

SOUND

  • WHIPLASH Thomas Curley, Ben Wilkins, Craig Mann

MAKE UP & HAIR

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Frances Hannon

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

  • INTERSTELLAR Paul Franklin, Scott Fisher, Andrew Lockley

ANIMATED FILM

  • THE LEGO MOVIE Phil Lord, Christopher Miller

DOCUMENTARY

  • CITIZENFOUR Laura Poitras

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

  • IDA Pawel Pawlikowski, Eric Abraham, Piotr Dzieciol, Ewa Puszczynska

BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION

  • THE BIGGER PICTURE Chris Hees, Daisy Jacobs, Jennifer Majka

BRITISH SHORT FILM

  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM Brian J. Falconer, Michael Lennox, Ronan Blaney

THE EE RISING STAR AWARD (voted for by the public)

  • JACK O’CONNELL

===

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Julianne Moore, Eddie Redmayne, Team Boyhood and others.

MOORE

REDMAYNE

BOYHOOD

(lower quality video — will try to find better replacements)

STEPHEN FRY OPENING

LINKLATER

ARQUETTE

SIMMONS

LUBEZSKI

IDA

THEORY OF EVERYTHING BRITISH FILM

THEORY OF EVERYTHING SCREENPLAY

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL SCREENPLAY

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL PRODUCTION DESIGN

JACK O’CONNELL

INTERSTELLAR VISUAL EFFECTS

BAFTA BACKSTAGE

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UPDATED: Much better quality clip

Just for fun, here’s Mike Leigh in 2010, with a few choice words to say about the BAFTAs and the Oscars

BAFTA

The good news is that the BAFTAs haven’t happened yet – the bad news is we lost our old contest forms during a website hack that occurred yesterday. That means if you’re still interested in predicting the BAFTAs you can either use the return receipt that was sent to you to calculate your own score or you can re-enter here. Good luck!

(Thanks to Craig and Ryan for helping to put it back together)



BAFTA

This Sunday, the British Academy will have their say as to what will win. Predicting the BAFTAS is always a tricky thing to do because they genuinely can be unpredictable. Making them even more unpredictable is that their voting practices have changed so many times over the years that it’s hard to find any sort of patterns. For instance, they pushed their date to be before the Oscars only in 2000. In 2012 they swapped their nomination procedure to being more like the Oscars, wherein the various branches chooses the nominees and the whole body votes for the winners. Before that they did it in the opposite fashion.

So, to a degree, they should be easy to predict, right? The consensus is, so far, the consensus. In 2012, they went for Argo and last year they went for the agreed upon split between Alfonso Cuaron for Director and 12 Years for Picture. Since our own Academy has an ongoing love affair with all things British, they keep nominating British people, thus the Oscars are full of British voters, which makes the BAFTAs fairly reliable in terms of picking potential upsets.

This site has their predictions up and they’re going for:

Boyhood/Linklater
Imitation Game for Adapted Screenplay
Grand Budapest for Original
Rosamund Pike for Best Actress
Eddie Redmayne for Best Actor
JK Simmons and Patricia Arquette for supporting

The only real surprise there is that there is no Birdman in any of the major categories. I’m not sure that’s how it will go but if it does, you can probably scratch Birdman off your list for Best Picture win at the Oscars.

I am not so sure it will go that way. I think it could split but I just don’t know which way it will split. I just don’t know how popular Birdman is at the BAFTAs. I do know it also does not have an editing nomination there. Grand Budapest Hotel seems to be their favorite movie as it’s represented in nearly every category.

That makes me wonder if Wes Anderson might not pick up the top prize there. Since Budapest beat Birdman at the Globes that is also a peculiar development in the race. Birdman is popular with the actors, for sure, and they make up the Academy’s largest branch. Birdman also beat the other films at the PGA, but they use a preferential ballot and BAFTA does not.

Budapest is going to take votes away from some movie – I just don’t know which.

The only lament I have and hope that it will come true is that the BAFTA will not follow the usual pattern of awards season by not awarding Gillian Flynn for Gone Girl just because it lacks an Oscar nod. The entire awards race should not always bow down to the Motion Picture Academy. I do not think that puts thousands of minds to good use. I hope they resist the urge to fold under the limited consensus.

I will be sitting this one out because I really have no skill when it comes to predicting the BAFTAs. I never have, in fact. Hardly anyone ever gets them right.

But here is your chance to be a shot if YOU know how they will go.

[please check back in a bit – we’re upgrading the software – apologies!]

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ralph-fiennes-in-the-grand-budapest-hotel-movie-1

I have not found the BAFTAS to be, overall, a good influence on the Oscar race. While some of their choices are mildly interesting — Under the Skin here, Paddington there — for the most part they do what too many of the precursors do, with the sole exception of the National Society of Film Critics, pick the same movies they think Oscar voters will. Rather than lead, they merely confirm what we’ve suspected all along, which is really what the BAFTAs did with their announcement. No surprises, nothing particularly interesting, just another link in the chain of predictability.

What it shows is that the films that were already popular in this year’s race are still popular. The films that have tried to push through are having a harder time, most especially Selma. You can’t really fault the Brits for not caring about Selma. After all, what do they care about what is a distinctly American problem? Selma resonates here because its both revolutionary in terms of being directed and partly written by an African American woman but also because we are still knee deep in many of the problems the film represents – voter suppression, racism, police violence.

To denounce Selma is to announce not giving a damn about the cultural currents that run through our modern life, to stick to what one likes no matter if it has meaning beyond “I LOVED IT.” I didn’t expect them to go there (or anywhere outside the consensus, really) so there is no anger to be had, just resignation to what is.

There was something to celebrate. Wes Anderson’s Grand Budapest leads, which gives the director overdue recognition. If you’re a fan of his you will be happy that they’ve finally found of film of his they liked. If you like Birdman and The Imitation Game and The Theory of Everything, you’re equally lucky. Me, I’m ready to watch Boyhood take the season and stick a fork a fork in this year’s race.

The BAFTAs don’t match the Oscar race, but they can sometimes tell you where it’s going. For instance, last year, if you combined the Best Picture and Best Director categories you could sort of cobble together where Oscar might be going:

This race kind of feeds itself. It sets up a situation that is fulfilled by lowered expectations. It isn’t that the five films up for Best Picture at the BAFTAs are bad choices, particularly, it’s that they were so utterly predictable as to become yet another echo in an increasingly pointless echo chamber.

Like Oscar voters, the BAFTA voters look at movies as magic mirrors. They see themselves and they like what they see. They are heroes here, changing the world – Alan Turing, Stephen Hawking and Paddington. They, unlike the Americans, have pride in their culture and they use the BAFTAs to celebrate that pride, even if it means nominating James Marsh for Best Director. Yes, even that.

There isn’t any real problem with the BAFTAs as far as I can tell. It isn’t really my place to criticize them. I actually support their support of homegrown product and I wish the Oscars would reject most British product and celebrate the diverse and exciting wave of film that’s happening in THIS country. Too many of the British films in the mix this year are far too safe and traditional to help the awards race do anything but continue with the same sentence, over and over, honoring the same kinds of films, over and over again. Feels as though we’re running in a hamster wheel. I don’t know when this became the norm for the “Oscar movie” but it remains the norm after today’s BAFTA list, thus shunting the Oscars off into their happy little corner, far far away from what’s exciting about American film now.

Sure, filmmakers in other countries are kicking our ass regularly with challenging storytelling that is free from the constraints of opening weekend pressure, an increasingly branded ticket buying public, and the need to turn film into fast food — limited choices, expectations met. But so much of what’s happening in American film is, to me, very exciting — from Wes Anderson and Richard Linklater, but also to David Fincher, Ava DuVernay, Paul Thomas Anderson, Dan Gilroy, Bennett Miller — these dark, dark movies going to battle with the insurmountable feelgood movies should teach us all we need to know about how the Oscars work.

If you cover the race, it’s better to be like Scott Feinberg, Kris Tapley, Dave Karger and Pete Hammond. You don’t get your heart involved. You keep your own tastes separate from your analysis of the race. That’s hard for me to do because I know that the Oscars CAN sometimes mean something more. They don’t have to be a reflection of my personal taste (although there’s nothing better when that happens) but when they merely confirm what we suspected they would do going all the way back to September I’m not really sure what the point of any of it is. We predict, the voters confirm. Rinse, repeat.

Anne Thompson gets props for being the only pundit to really call The Grand Budapest Hotel and Whiplash. Feinberg, Tapley, Karger, Hammond, and Thelma Adams get credit for predicting Gone Girl to be not Oscar-y enough. They lose points for their sight unseen predictions of Interstellar and Unbroken for the win. At one point, Tapley had both Angelina Jolie and Ava DuVernay for Best Director. That was idealism at its very best. Me, I hope that I ruffled a few feathers, opened a few doors. Beyond that, I’m not as interested in being right about the race as I in being right about the conversation. Two of the only three movies I cared about are looking to be shut out – Selma and Gone Girl. Only Boyhood remains.

Our magic mirror really only has room for one kind of reflection. There rest of us get to stand next to it and watch the others preen. We will never see ourselves because we have been told that we don’t matter except when we can function as props for the more important white male protagonist. The BAFTAs have merely sealed the deal.

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BEST FILM

  • BIRDMAN Alejandro G. Iñárritu, John Lesher, James W. Skotchdopole
  • BOYHOOD Richard Linklater, Cathleen Sutherland
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Wes Anderson, Scott Rudin, Steven Rales, Jeremy Dawson
  • THE IMITATION GAME Nora Grossman, Ido Ostrowsky, Teddy Schwarzman
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten

OUTSTANDING BRITISH FILM

  • ’71 Yann Demange, Angus Lamont, Robin Gutch, Gregory Burke
  • THE IMITATION GAME Morten Tyldum, Nora Grossman, Ido Ostrowsky, Teddy Schwarzman, Graham Moore
  • PADDINGTON Paul King, David Heyman
  • PRIDE Matthew Warchus, David Livingstone, Stephen Beresford
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING James Marsh, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Lisa Bruce, Anthony McCarten
  • UNDER THE SKIN Jonathan Glazer, James Wilson, Nick Wechsler, Walter Campbell

OUTSTANDING DEBUT BY A BRITISH WRITER, DIRECTOR OR PRODUCER

  • ELAINE CONSTANTINE (Writer/Director) Northern Soul
  • GREGORY BURKE (Writer), YANN DEMANGE (Director) ’71
  • HONG KHAOU (Writer/Director) Lilting
  • PAUL KATIS (Director/Producer), ANDREW DE LOTBINIÈRE (Producer) Kajaki: The True Story
  • STEPHEN BERESFORD (Writer), DAVID LIVINGSTONE (Producer) Pride

FILM NOT IN THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

  • IDA Pawel Pawlikowski, Eric Abraham, Piotr Dzieciol, Ewa Puszczynska
  • LEVIATHAN Andrey Zvyagintsev, Alexander Rodnyansky, Sergey Melkumov
  • THE LUNCHBOX Ritesh Batra, Arun Rangachari, Anurag Kashyap, Guneet Monga
  • TRASH Stephen Daldry, Tim Bevan, Eric Fellner, Kris Thykier
  • TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT Jean-Pierre Dardenne, Luc Dardenne, Denis Freyd

DOCUMENTARY

  • 20 FEET FROM STARDOM Morgan Neville, Caitrin Rogers, Gil Friesen
  • 20,000 DAYS ON EARTH Iain Forsyth, Jane Pollard
  • CITIZENFOUR Laura Poitras
  • FINDING VIVIAN MAIER John Maloof, Charlie Siskel
  • VIRUNGA Orlando von Einsiedel, Joanna Natasegara

ANIMATED FILM

  • BIG HERO 6 Don Hall, Chris Williams
  • THE BOXTROLLS Anthony Stacchi, Graham Annable
  • THE LEGO MOVIE Phil Lord, Christopher Miller

DIRECTOR

  • BIRDMAN Alejandro G. Iñárritu
  • BOYHOOD Richard Linklater
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Wes Anderson
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING James Marsh
  • WHIPLASH Damien Chazelle

ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY

  • BIRDMAN Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr, Armando Bo
  • BOYHOOD Richard Linklater
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Wes Anderson
  • NIGHTCRAWLER Dan Gilroy
  • WHIPLASH Damien Chazelle

ADAPTED SCREENPLAY

  • AMERICAN SNIPER Jason Hall
  • GONE GIRL Gillian Flynn
  • THE IMITATION GAME Graham Moore
  • PADDINGTON Paul King
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Anthony McCarten

LEADING ACTOR

  • BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH The Imitation Game
  • EDDIE REDMAYNE The Theory of Everything
  • JAKE GYLLENHAAL Nightcrawler
  • MICHAEL KEATON Birdman
  • RALPH FIENNES The Grand Budapest Hotel

LEADING ACTRESS

  • AMY ADAMS Big Eyes
  • FELICITY JONES The Theory of Everything
  • JULIANNE MOORE Still Alice
  • REESE WITHERSPOON Wild
  • ROSAMUND PIKE Gone Girl

SUPPORTING ACTOR

  • EDWARD NORTON Birdman
  • ETHAN HAWKE Boyhood
  • J.K. SIMMONS Whiplash
  • MARK RUFFALO Foxcatcher
  • STEVE CARELL Foxcatcher

SUPPORTING ACTRESS

  • EMMA STONE Birdman
  • IMELDA STAUNTON Pride
  • KEIRA KNIGHTLEY The Imitation Game
  • PATRICIA ARQUETTE Boyhood
  • RENE RUSSO Nightcrawler

ORIGINAL MUSIC

  • BIRDMAN Antonio Sanchez
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Alexandre Desplat
  • INTERSTELLAR Hans Zimmer
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Jóhann Jóhannsson
  • UNDER THE SKIN Mica Levi

CINEMATOGRAPHY

  • BIRDMAN Emmanuel Lubezki
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Robert Yeoman
  • IDA Lukasz Zal, Ryzsard Lenczewski
  • INTERSTELLAR Hoyte van Hoytema
  • MR. TURNER Dick Pope

EDITING Due to a tie in voting in this category, there are six nominations

  • BIRDMAN Douglas Crise, Stephen Mirrione
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Barney Pilling
  • THE IMITATION GAME William Goldenberg
    NIGHTCRAWLER John Gilroy
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Jinx Godfrey
  • WHIPLASH Tom Cross

PRODUCTION DESIGN

  • BIG EYES Rick Heinrichs, Shane Vieau
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Adam Stockhausen, Anna Pinnock
  • THE IMITATION GAME Maria Djurkovic, Tatiana MacDonald
  • INTERSTELLAR Nathan Crowley, Gary Fettis
  • MR. TURNER Suzie Davies, Charlotte Watts

COSTUME DESIGN

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Milena Canonero
  • THE IMITATION GAME Sammy Sheldon Differ
  • INTO THE WOODS Colleen Atwood
  • MR. TURNER Jacqueline Durran
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Steven Noble

MAKE UP & HAIR

  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Frances Hannon
  • GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Elizabeth Yianni-Georgiou, David White
  • INTO THE WOODS Peter Swords King, J. Roy Helland
  • MR. TURNER Christine Blundell, Lesa Warrener
  • THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING Jan Sewell

SOUND

  • AMERICAN SNIPER Walt Martin, John Reitz, Gregg Rudloff, Alan Robert Murray, Bub Asman
  • BIRDMAN Thomas Varga, Martin Hernández, Aaron Glascock, Jon Taylor, Frank A. Montaño
  • THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL Wayne Lemmer, Christopher Scarabosio, Pawel Wdowczak
  • THE IMITATION GAME John Midgley, Lee Walpole, Stuart Hilliker, Martin Jensen
  • WHIPLASH Thomas Curley, Ben Wilkins, Craig Mann

SPECIAL VISUAL EFFECTS

  • DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES Joe Letteri, Dan Lemmon, Erik Winquist, Daniel Barrett
  • GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Stephane Ceretti, Paul Corbould, Jonathan Fawkner, Nicolas Aithadi
  • THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES Joe Letteri, Eric Saindon, David Clayton, R. Christopher White
  • INTERSTELLAR Paul Franklin, Scott Fisher, Andrew Lockley
  • X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST Richard Stammers, Anders Langlands, Tim Crosbie, Cameron Waldbauer

BRITISH SHORT ANIMATION

  • THE BIGGER PICTURE Chris Hees, Daisy Jacobs, Jennifer Majka
  • MONKEY LOVE EXPERIMENTS Ainslie Henderson, Cam Fraser, Will Anderson
  • MY DAD Marcus Armitage

BRITISH SHORT FILM

  • BOOGALOO AND GRAHAM Brian J. Falconer, Michael Lennox, Ronan Blaney
  • EMOTIONAL FUSEBOX Michael Berliner, Rachel Tunnard
  • THE KÁRMÁN LINE Campbell Beaton, Dawn King, Tiernan Hanby, Oscar Sharp
  • SLAP Islay Bell-Webb, Michelangelo Fano, Nick Rowland
  • THREE BROTHERS Aleem Khan, Matthieu de Braconier, Stephanie Paeplow

THE EE RISING STAR AWARD (voted for by the public)

  • GUGU MBATHA-RAW
  • JACK O’CONNELL
  • MARGOT ROBBIE
  • MILES TELLER
  • SHAILENE WOODLEY

Nominations are correct at the time of going to print. BAFTA reserves the right to make changes to the names listed at any time up until 8 February 2015.

9 January 2015

About BAFTA

The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA) is an independent charity that supports, develops and promotes the art forms of the moving image by identifying and rewarding excellence, inspiring practitioners and benefiting the public. In addition to its awards ceremonies, BAFTA has a year-round, international programme of learning events and initiatives that offers unique access to some of the world’s most inspiring talent through workshops, masterclasses, scholarships, lectures and mentoring schemes, connecting with audiences of all ages and backgrounds across the UK, Los Angeles and New York. BAFTA relies on income from membership subscriptions, individual donations, trusts, foundations and corporate partnerships to support its ongoing outreach work. To access the best creative minds in film, TV and games production, visit www.bafta.org/guru. For more information, visit www.bafta.org.

 

bafta-winners-mickey-AP_630

Tonight, the BAFTAs will announce their nominees. But they, like the winners of the Golden Globes and the DGA will have no impact on how the Oscars are voted because their ballots are turned in tonight at 5pm.  

The BAFTAs also have such a varied history it’s hard to gauge how influential they have been.  For instance, they only changed their date to be before the Oscars in 2000.  Secondly, two years ago they completely changed the way they vote on awards. They used to have everyone do the nominating and then each individual branch would vote on the winners. Now they’ve reversed it (I think).  Each branch does the nominating and the whole voting body picks winners, which is how the Academy does it.

Last year, BAFTA nominations came out, once again, the same day as Oscar ballots where due, thus there could be no direct influence by them. This is how they went. They can, however, be indicative of what might be the “BAFTA SURPRISE,” that last little piece of the puzzle to throw everything out of whack.

What we know will be HUGE with the BAFTA to a deafening and threatening degree will be The Imitation Game. Though it doesn’t have a British director, it has a British hero at its center. It will do battle with The Theory of Everything in both Best Picture and Best British picture.

Last year’s BAFTA surprise was clearly Philomena. Its presence in the race popped up at BAFTA, then showed up in the Oscar nominations. There is so much crossover voting because … well … British people. Also, the British tend to make movies Oscar voters like — where the Americans are trying to work outside of that box.

The year before there wasn’t really much of a BAFTA surprise, except that Emmanuelle Riva won Best Actress but Jennifer Lawrence still won the Oscar.

This year we know we have The Imitation Game and Theory of Everything sewn up. What we don’t know is whether Mr. Turner will in fact make an appearance there or not, becoming the Philomena of this year. One of the things driving Philomena’s inclusion was that it was one of the more gently moving stories in the race. What a wonderful story, even if the film wasn’t roundly accepted by critics. It make an imprint on the heart, which is really what can drive these last minute inclusions. I don’t know if Mr. Turner does that. But maybe the fact that Turner is such a famous British painter and a source of pride, the BAFTAS this year might be All British All the Time with three, count ’em, three famous British men who really did greatly impact their culture and cultures throughout the world.

I don’t know if Mr. Turner will show up at the BAFTAS at all, or whether if it does that means it will then show up at the Oscars. This year seems to produce one question after another, after another. They’re coming eleven hours from now.

I suspect Best Picture will go like:
Boyhood
Birdman
Grand Budapest Hotel
Imitation Game
Nightcrawler or Theory of Everything or Gone Girl

British Film
Imitation Game
Mr. Turner
Theory of Everything

The rest, I have no idea.

bafta dd

Seems this year the complaints about the BAFTA’s outdated 2-hour delay between actual event and edited broadcast have grown louder than ever, so maybe one of these years before long the ceremony will be broadcast live. Until then, the clips after the cut could be the first and only parts of last night’s proceedings that many of us are ever likely to see.

Continue reading…

bafta-winners-mickey-AP_630

Predicting 15 correct out of 20 possible choices:

min shark
Orpheus Febo
Gianna Grabowski
cyrus m
MIkhail Shurygin
Thomas Vogiatzis
Luis Burguete

Congratulations!

12yearsaslave

Best Picture – 12 Years a Slave
Best Director – Alfonso Cuarón, Gravity
Best Actor – Chiwetel Ejiofor, 12 Years a Slave
Best Actress – Cate Blanchett, Blue Jasmine
Best Supporting Actor – Barkhad Abdi, Captain Phillips
Best Supporting Actress – Jennifer Lawrence, American Hustle
Best Adapted Screenplay – Philomena, Steve Coogan and Jeff Pope
Best Original Screenplay – American Hustle, Eric Warren Singer and David O. Russell
Best Cinematography – Gravity, Emmanuel Lubezki
Best Documentary – The Act of Killing
Best Animated Feature – Frozen
Best Music – Gravity, Steven Price
Best British Film – Gravity
Best Editing – Rush
Best Production Design – The Great Gatsby
Best Costume Design – The Great Gatsby
Best Sound – Gravity
Best Hair & Make – American Hustle
Best British Short, Live Action – Room 8
Best British Short, Animation – Sleeping with the Fishes
Outstanding British Debut – Kelly & Victor
BAFTA Rising Star – Will Poulter

 

Spoiler alert — we will be posting the BAFTA winners here starting at 11am, California time. But the BBC broadcast won’t be seen until two hours after the awards are all announced.

Continue reading…

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In a way, Oscars 2013 could be summed up by “Kicking the Best Picture can down the road.” We keep looking to a new voting body to decide what the best picture of 2013 will be. Here’s a quick rundown so far of the majors.

Toronto–Audience award goes to 12 Years a Slave over Gravity
New York Film Critics – Best Picture goes to American Hustle, McQueen gets Director
National Board of Review – Best Picture goes to Her, Spike Jonze gets Director
Los Angeles – tie between Gravity and Her, Alfonso Cuaron gets Best Director
Southeastern Film Critics – 12 Years a Slave, McQueen gets Best Director
Golden Globes – 12 Years a Slave for Picture, Alfonso Cuaron for Director
Critics Choice – 12 Years a Slave for Picture, Alfonso Cuaron for Director
Producers Guild – a Tie between Gravity and 12 Years a Slave
SAG ensemble – American Hustle
Directors Guild – Alfonso Cuaron for Gravity
Eddies – Captain Phillips and American Hustle
Writers Guild – Captain Phillips and Her
Scripters – 12 Years a Slave

Now, we must kick the can down the road once more and await the final piece of evidence in the case for Best Picture.  The BAFTAS.  Here’s what you need to know about them and why they matter.

1) The Academy has a lot of British voters in it. That explains why last minute BAFTA nominations, and winners, often impact Oscar voting. It is less about influence and more about crossover voting.

Continue reading…

Queen-Elizabeth-II-receives-an-honorary-Bafta-1813022

It must be Oscar ballot time!  Remember what I told you, Oscar watchers.  The film that usually wins King’s Speech style is the one that people say they love while saying another (bad) movie will win. Happens every year. “Lincoln is so boring it has to win. But I loved that Argo!””The Social Network has won everything, it HAS to win the Oscar but my favorite is The King’s Speech!” That’s the awards race in a nutshell. Perception. It’s all about perception. 

Ladies and gentlemen, I present to you, your average BAFTA voter. Meet Toby Young, admitted BAFTA member with a Telegraph piece entitled “Is 12 Years a Slave Torture Porn for Guardian readers? This is when the average voter begins to feel victimized and starts talking about how the movie that’s going to win shouldn’t win.

On Gravity:

Everything you’ve heard about Gravity is true. I actually paid to see it at the cinema in spite of being sent the DVD and it lived up to the hype. It’s mesmerising, spellbinding, thrilling. A thing of beauty. But I can’t see it winning many of the big awards because, essentially, it’s a popcorn movie. Yes, yes, Sandra Bullock is good in the central role, but she’s notthat good and I doubt there’ll be enough feminists among Bafta’s membership who’ll vote for her because, you know, she’s proved that you can still be a female movie star after the age of 40. Best Director? Too much competition in that category. As for the script… no. It’s rubbish.

Continue reading…

2013 NOMINATIONS (presented in 2014)
BEST FILM

  • 12 YEARS A SLAVE Anthony Katagas, Brad Pitt, Dede Gardner, Jeremy Kleiner, Steve McQueen
  • AMERICAN HUSTLE Charles Roven, Richard Suckle, Megan Ellison, Jonathan Gordon
  • CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Scott Rudin, Dana Brunetti, Michael De Luca
  • GRAVITY Alfonso Cuarón, David Heyman
  • PHILOMENA Gabrielle Tana, Steve Coogan, Tracey Seaward

DIRECTOR

  • 12 YEARS A SLAVE Steve McQueen
  • AMERICAN HUSTLE David O. Russell
  • CAPTAIN PHILLIPS Paul Greengrass
  • GRAVITY Alfonso Cuarón
  • THE WOLF OF WALL STREET Martin Scorsese

LEADING ACTOR

  • BRUCE DERN Nebraska
  • CHIWETEL EJIOFOR 12 Years a Slave
  • CHRISTIAN BALE American Hustle
  • LEONARDO DICAPRIO The Wolf of Wall Street
  • TOM HANKS Captain Phillips

LEADING ACTRESS

  • AMY ADAMS American Hustle
  • CATE BLANCHETT Blue Jasmine
  • EMMA THOMPSON Saving Mr. Banks
  • JUDI DENCH Philomena
  • SANDRA BULLOCK Gravity

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The BAFTA, British Academy of Film and Television Arts, will be announced via livestream on January 8th. You’ll have to figure out what that time will be in your own time zone as I can’t even figure out my own (it’s my tragic flaw).  The BAFTA have become much more like Oscar over the years since they changed their date from after to before the Oscars (around the year 2000).  They really do seem to mirror the Oscars some years, especially last – when Ben Affleck and Argo took their top awards.  Emmanuelle Riva won Best Actress.

This year, the BAFTA, I expect, will go ass over elbow for American Hustle, as the American critics apparently have.  The Brits seem to get Martin Scorsese’s Wolf of Wall Street more than the American critics. Reception here has been mixed.
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Best Film: Argo
Leading Actor: Lincoln, Daniel Day-Lewis
Leading Actress: Amour, Emmanuelle Riva
Director: Argo, Ben Affleck
Film not in the English Language: Amour, Michael Haneke, Margaret Ménégoz
Supporting Actor: Django Unchained, Christoph Waltz
Supporting Actress: Les Miserables, Anne Hathaway
Cinematography: Life of Pi, Claudio Miranda

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I have been all that good at predicting the BAFTAs. They are like herding cats in many ways, unless they have aligned themselves with Oscar, which happens on occasion, and especially has been recently since Oscar pushed the date back. Very little wiggle room.  A consensus vote tells us which films are getting the popular vote at  a given moment in time.  And that’s what we’re faced with now and it looks like Argo has that vote locked up.  At least, with the BAFTAs, but maybe the Oscars too – who knows. By this point I might even have to add, who cares.  The BAFTAs will likely be a day for Argo fans to celebrate because they nominated Ben Affleck in the acting category, which tells us they really liked the movie.

But this guy at the Guardian believes that the most nominations might mean something at the BAFTAs – it didn’t mean anything at the Globes, nor the Critics Choice and probably not at the Oscars either — and what a shame that is.  He keeps hope alive over there at the Guardian, even calling Lincoln “the favourite.” But alas.

The real question on many people’s minds is whether Emmanuelle Riva can pick up some buzz at the BAFTAs. Remember, she’s 85. Oscar campaigning is going to be very difficult for her. I suspect she is rather amused by the dog and pony that it is. You live that long and almost everything amuses you. It would be a funny screenplay idea to follow her around with all of the publicists trying to talk her into doing stuff to get the win.  Maybe it is a high honor to win an Oscar. Maybe, in the end, it might not be, not after all we know about them.

It is a little depressing to see these awards always lean towards Oscar.  I am sure the BAFTA could unhinge themselves from Oscar if they wanted to but you can’t get the same attention from the press or the public unless you’re part of the “contest.”   And so this is the house that Jack built.  And we live in it.

Let’s go through the categories one by one.

BEST FILM

  • Argo –Sasha Stone, Marshall Flores
  • Les Miserables
  • Life of Pi, Ryan Adams
  • Lincoln
  • Zero Dark Thirty

Argo should handily win since it has all of the buzz right now. I have to stop predicting Lincoln to win because at this point it is no longer good for my heart to do so.  I have to force myself to say Argofuckyourself.  ARGO.  ARGO will win.  ARGO.  Alt. Life of Pi.

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One of the big awards shows, among many, inserted into the awards race now is the BAFTA, the British Academy of Film and Television Awards.  When I first started, in 1999, no one in the Oscar race paid any attention to the BAFTAs because they were held after the Oscars.  This put a healthy divide between the two groups and really did seem to mean — this is what THEY thought, rather than they trying to influence or match the Oscars, as most groups now do.   But they switched their date in 2000 to be held before the Oscars and now they’re just one of the precursors on the road to Oscar.

The British invasion is a notable strain that runs through the Oscars and always has done.  While America has, I think, produced some of the best film directors in the world, the Brits really influence the actors branch, the biggest voting block in the Academy.  They used to be known for not so much matching Oscar as being able to push through movies like The Pianist, or an acting contender like Marion Cotillard.  But once Oscar shifted its date from March back to February, and all of the awards shows then shifted their dates back, you had near-uniform voting across the board.   You have to go back to 2008 to find a year that didn’t match up with Oscar’s Best Picture when Atonement won.

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Here’s the brand new trailer for Pedro Almodovar’s Los Amantes Pasajeros. (thanks to Jesus Alonso)

The question came up on Twitter yesterday, What if Michael Haneke Won the BAFTA for Bes Director. Made me curious to see how often the BAFTA have awarded international directors (directors who aren’t from the UK or US or Aus whose native language isn’t English). The Oscars have only done so 6 times since 1970

1975 – Miloš Forman – One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest
1984 – Miloš Forman – Amadeus
1987 – Bernardo Bertolucci – The Last Emperor
2002 – Roman Polanski – The Pianist
2005 – Ang Lee – Brokeback Mountain
2011 – Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist

The BAFTAs are much more open to honoring international directors. Twice as frequently as the Oscars, 12 times since 1970 (roughly 29% of the time). BAFTA’s impressive list of International Directors, after the cut.

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