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Category : Hugo

Hugo and the Continuum

Hugo and the Continuum

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Guest essay by Michael in Florida Right after the first dreadful Hugo trailer premiered in July, I conjectured that Hugo was Martin Scorsese’s Schindler’s List, i.e., a film outside the director’s comfort zone. After seeing the film several times now, I can safely say that prediction turned out to be prescient, but for a different reason. While both films stretch their respective filmmakers as artists, they remain anchored to their…

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Best Director 2011: When I Paint My Masterpiece

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“I’d imagine the whole world was one big machine. Machines never come with any extra parts, you know. They always come with the exact amount they need. So I figured, if the entire world was one big machine, I couldn’t be an extra part. I had to be here for some reason.” — Hugo This year saw films by arguably the greatest directors America has ever produced — Woody Allen,…

Dargis and Scott Praise War Horse, Naming it one of the Best Films of 2011

Dargis and Scott Praise War Horse, Naming it one of the Best Films of 2011

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In their mostly frustrating, occasionally interesting discussion of movies Manohla Dargis disses the Artist (a “cute gimmick”) and both critics go nuts for the Spielberg film – though they can’t agree on Hugo: DARGIS  I can’t imagine, for instance, watching “War Horse” on a television, much less an iPhone: this is a self-consciously old-fashioned movie, shot in gorgeous film, which deserves to be seen projected on a big, bright screen and…

The Artist Wins Best Film, Scorsese Best Director in DC

The Artist Wins Best Film, Scorsese Best Director in DC

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The WAFCA (Washing DC area film critics) has announced their winners — and The Artist continues its run as winner – meanwhile, Martin Scorsese picks up Best Director.  The Artist and Hugo are kind of companion pieces, I think.  And something tells me watching Martin Scorsese and Michel Hanazavicius for a Q&A on movies would be something spectacular. They both pay homage to cinema, in every way, including how magical…

Hugo Surprises at the Box Office on Thanksgiving

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Martin Scorsese’s wonderful Hugo was down for the count  - reports that it would get killed by Twilight and by The Muppets turned out to be false when Hugo, bolstered by rave reviews and buzz, landed high at number 3, according to the Hollywood Reporter. How this will look when the weekend comes to a close is a mystery. But for now, it’s promising that the public could turn out…

Hugo clocks in with major raves from top critics

Hugo clocks in with major raves from top critics

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4-star reviews from The New Yorker, Variety, Box Office Magazine, The Hollywood Reporter. 4 stars from Roger Ebert. No fan of 3-D, Ebert says, “Scorsese uses 3-D here as it should be used, not as a gimmick but as an enhancement of the total effect.” David Denby at The New Yorker says, “Reality, filmed illusion, and dreams are so intertwined that only an artist, playing merrily with echoes, can sort…

Asa Butterfield and Chloë Grace Moretz in new Hugo clip

Asa Butterfield and Chloë Grace Moretz in new Hugo clip

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Nice line of dialogue, wisely lifted verbatim, word for word, from the book.

TIME's Richard Corliss on Hugo, "A Masterpiece"

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Richard Corliss’ review will appear in TIME’s Hollywood preview issue.  I am transcribing it here. Martin Scorsese made  his rep as the fierce bard of American gangster machismo. From Mean Streets to The Departed, he has sung the body choleric.  So why would he make a film of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick’s rhapsodically nostalgic children’s book? Because Hugo is fascinated by artistic contraptions that cast spells over…

TIME’s Richard Corliss on Hugo, “A Masterpiece”

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Richard Corliss’ review will appear in TIME’s Hollywood preview issue.  I am transcribing it here. Martin Scorsese made  his rep as the fierce bard of American gangster machismo. From Mean Streets to The Departed, he has sung the body choleric.  So why would he make a film of The Invention of Hugo Cabret, Brian Selznick’s rhapsodically nostalgic children’s book? Because Hugo is fascinated by artistic contraptions that cast spells over…

Celebrating Scorsese … In a New Way

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NPR profiles Scorsese and Hugo, which reminds me that it’s wholly unexpected to see Martin Scorsese take such a radical shift as a storyteller and filmmaker. Like John Stewart said, he was used to the high body count.  When the trailer for Hugo was released people started whining about how it wasn’t a “Scorsese movie.”  But you know, this is a director who has always tried different genres — he’s…