Critics Awards

2014-15-galeca-dorian-awards

Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Name Boyhood Film of the Year. DuVernay is Director of the Year for Selma. Moore and Redmayne Take Actor Prizes.

GALECA’S 2014/15 DORIAN AWARD NOMINEES AND WINNERS:

FILM OF THE YEAR
Birdman – Fox Searchlight
Boyhood – Sundance Selects/IFC
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Pride – CBS Films

FILM PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR – ACTOR
Steve Carell, Foxcatcher – Sony Pictures Classics
Benedict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler – Open Road
Michael Keaton, Birdman – Fox Searchlight
Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything – Focus Features/Universal

FILM PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR – ACTRESS
Essie Davis, The Babadook – Sundance Selects/IFC
Anne Dorval, Mommy – Roadside Attractions
Julianne Moore, Still Alice – Sony Pictures Classics
Rosamund Pike, Gone Girl – 20th Century Fox
Reese Witherspoon, Wild – Fox Searchlight

FILM DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
Ava DuVernay, Selma – Paramount
David Fincher, Gone Girl – 20th Century Fox
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Birdman – Fox Searchight
Richard Linklater, Boyhood – Sundance Selects/IFC

LGBTQ FILM OF THE YEAR
The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Love is Strange – Sony Pictures Classics
Pride – CBS Films
Stranger by the Lake – Strand Releasing
The Way He Looks – Strand Releasing

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR
Force Majeure – Magnolia Pictures
Ida – Music Box Films
Mommy – Roadside Attractions
Stranger by the Lake – Strand Releasing
Two Days, One Night – Sundance Selects/IFC

UNSUNG FILM OF THE YEAR
Obvious Child – A24
Love is Strange – Sony Pictures Classics
Pride – CBS Films
The Skeleton Twins – Roadside Attractions
Snowpiercer – Radius/TWC

DOCUMENTARY FILM OF THE YEAR
(theatrical release, TV airing or DVD release)
The Case Against 8 – HBO
CitizenFour – Radius/TWC
Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me – Sundance Selects
Life Itself – Magnolia Pictures
Regarding Susan Sontag – HBO

VISUALLY STRIKING FILM OF THE YEAR
(honoring a production of stunning beauty, from art direction to cinematography)
Birdman – Fox Searchlight
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
Interstellar – Paramount
Snowpiercer – Radius/TWC
Under the Skin – A24

CAMPY FLICK OF THE YEAR
Annie
Gone Girl
Into the Woods
Maleficent
Tammy

TV DRAMA OF THE YEAR
Fargo – FX
The Good Wife – CBS
How To Get Away with Murder – ABC
Mad Men – AMC
The Normal Heart – HBO

TV COMEDY OF THE YEAR
The Comeback – HBO
Modern Family – ABC
Orange is the New Black – Netflix
Transparent – Amazon
Veep – HBO

TV DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Lisa Cholodenko, Olive Kitteridge – HBO
Jodie Foster, Orange is the New Black -Netflix
Andrew Haigh, Looking – HBO
Ryan Murphy, The Normal Heart – HBO
Jill Soloway, Transparent – Amazon

TV PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR – ACTOR
Matthew Bomer, The Normal Heart – HBO
Matthew McConaughey, True Detective – HBO
Mark Ruffalo, The Normal Heart – HBO
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards – Netflix
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent – Amazon

TV PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR – ACTRESS
Viola Davis, How to Get Away with Murder – ABC
Lisa Kudrow, The Comeback – HBO
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife – CBS
Tatiana Maslany, Orphan Black – BBC America
Frances McDormand, Olive Kitteridge – HBO

TV MUSICAL PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR
Beyonce, MTV Video Music Awards – MTV
Neil Patrick Harris, “Sugar Daddy,” The Tony Awards – CBS
Jessica Lange, “Life on Mars,” American Horror Story: Freak Show – FX
Macklemore, Ryan Lewis, Madonna, et al., “Same Love,” The Grammys – CBS
Prince, Saturday Night Live – NBC

LGBTQ TV SHOW OF THE YEAR
Looking – HBO
Modern Family – ABC
Orange is the New Black – Netflix
Please Like Me – Pivot
Transparent – Amazon

UNSUNG TV SHOW OF THE YEAR
Getting On – HBO
Looking – HBO
Orphan Black – BBC America
Please Like Me – Pivot
Transparent – Amazon

TV CURRENT AFFAIRS SHOW OF THE YEAR
Anderson Cooper 360 – CNN
The Colbert Report – Comedy Central
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart – Comedy Central
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver – HBO
The Rachel Maddow Show – MSNBC

CAMPTY TV SHOW OF THE YEAR
American Horror Story: Freak Show
How to Get Away with Murder
Jane the Virgin
Peter Pan Live!
Penny Dreadful

MUSIC VIDEO OF THE YEAR
Nicki Minaj, “Anaconda”
Perfume Genius, “Queen”
Sia, “Chandelier”
Taylor Swift, “Blank Space”
Meghan Trainor, “All About That Bass”

THE “WE’RE WILDE ABOUT YOU!” RISING STAR AWARD
Ansel Elgort
Jack Falahee
Ellar Coltrane
Jack O’Connell
Gina Rodriguez
Finn Wittrock

WILDE WIT OF THE YEAR
(honoring a performer, writer or commentator whose observations both challenge and amuse)
Stephen Colbert
Rachel Maddow
Bill Maher
John Oliver
Jon Stewart

WILDE ARTIST OF THE YEAR
(honoring a truly groundbreaking force in the fields of film, theater and/or television)
Xavier Dolan
Neil Patrick Harris
Richard Linklater
Jill Soloway
Tilda Swinton

TIMELESS AWARD
(to an actor or performer whose exemplary career is marked by character, wisdom and wit)
George Takei

==

(PRESS RELEASE) / Tuesday, January 20, 2015 — In perhaps the latest boost to stars and studios seeking the ultimate golden statuette this awards season, the Gay and Lesbian Entertainment Critics Association (GALECA), comprised of over 110 movie and TV critics nationwide, today officially announced their choices for 2014’s finest in film and television. The wins come across 25 categories, from mainstream to LGBTQ-centric, from Rising Star to Music Video of the Year.

At the top of the list: GALECA deemed Boyhood, director Richard Linklater’s visceral, literally decades-spanning look at familial love, worthy of its Dorian Award for Film of the Year.

Julianne Moore in Still Alice was the group’s pick for Film Performance of the Year — Actress, while Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything) took Film Performance of the Year — Actor. Ava DuVernay, who helmed the Civil Rights-era drama Selma, was named Film Director of the Year.

Pride, the true-life story of how a group of gays and lesbians championed striking blue-collar miners in Thatcher-era England, earned LGBTQ Film of the Year as well as Unsung Film of the Year honors. The Case Against 8 was chosen as Documentary of the Year over titles as varied as CitizenFour and Regarding Susan Sontag. GALECA’s Visually Striking Film of the Year is Wes Anderson’s gorgeous period romp The Grand Budapest Hotel. Into the Woods took Campy Film of the Year semi-honors.

One of the few critics associations awarding the year’s best in both film and TV, GALECA chose Amazon’s freshman breakout Transparent as TV Comedy of the Year. The life-inspired tale, starring Jeffrey Tambor as a biological man who comes out to his family as a woman, took four awards in all, including wins for Tambor and creator/director Jill Soloway. In addition, Soloway was also dubbed GALECA’s latest Wilde Artist of the Year, following in the bold footsteps of last year’s winner, James Franco.

In other categories, Lisa Kudrow took TV Performance of the Year — Actress for her return as fame-craving actress Valerie Cherish in The Comeback.

John Oliver (Wilde Wit of the Year), Neil Patrick Harris (for a certain, dazzling Tony Awards rock performance from Hedwig and the Angry Inch), pop star Sia (her stunningly choreographed filmic interpretation of “Chandelier” was Video of the Year) and TV upstart Gina Rodriguez (“We’re Wilde About You!” Rising Star) were other triumphant names in the mix.

As previously announced, the group chose George Takei as the recipient of its special Timeless star tribute, given to “an actor or performer whose exemplary career is marked by character, wisdom and wit.”

The complete list of Dorian Award winners, noted in bold among nominees, is below. GALECA’s annual, private Winners Toast will be held Sunday, March 1, in Hollywood.

For more information, visit galeca.com. Also, follow GALECA on Twitter at twitter.com/DorianAwards and become a fan at facebook.com/dorianawards.

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I think you’ll all agree Jessica Chastain’s fantastic speech is a perfect fit for the attitudes we try our best to promote at Awards Daily.

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Best Picture – “Boyhood”
Best Actor – Michael Keaton, “Birdman”
Best Actress – Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”
Best Supporting Actor – J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”
Best Supporting Actress – Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”
Best Young Actor/Actress – Ellar Coltrane, “Boyhood”
Best Acting Ensemble – “Birdman”
Best Director – Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”
Best Original Screenplay – Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., Armando Bo, “Birdman”
Best Adapted Screenplay – Gillian Flynn, “Gone Girl”
Best Cinematography – Emmanuel Lubezki, “Birdman”
Best Art Direction – Adam Stockhausen (Production Designer), Anna Pinnock (Set Decorator), “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Best Editing – Douglas Crise, Stephen Mirrione, “Birdman”
Best Costume Design – Milena Canonero, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Best Hair & Makeup – “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Best Visual Effects – “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”
Best Animated Feature – “The Lego Movie”
Best Action Movie – “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Best Actor in an Action Movie – Bradley Cooper, “American Sniper”
Best Actress in an Action Movie – Emily Blunt, “Edge of Tomorrow”
Best Comedy – “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Best Actor in a Comedy – Michael Keaton, “Birdman”
Best Actress in a Comedy – Jenny Slate, “Obvious Child”
Best Sci-Fi/Horror Movie – “Interstellar”
Best Foreign Language Film – “Force Majeure”
Best Documentary Feature – “Life Itself”
Best Song – “Glory”, Common and John Legend, “Selma”
Best Score – Antonio Sanchez, “Birdman”

Critics-Choice-Awards

There could be some strange surprises with the Critics Choice, wherein some people could win that weren’t even nominated for an Oscar.  Here are the nominees. I have bolded the likely winner in red and

NOMINATIONS FOR THE 20th ANNUAL CRITICS’ CHOICE MOVIE AWARDS

BEST PICTURE
Birdman <–alt 1
Boyhood
Gone Girl
The Grand Budapest Hotel <–alt 2
The Imitation Game
Nightcrawler
Selma
The Theory of Everything
Unbroken
Whiplash

BEST ACTOR
Benedict Cumberbatch – The Imitation Game
Ralph Fiennes – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Jake Gyllenhaal – Nightcrawler <—alt.
Michael Keaton – Birdman
David Oyelowo – Selma
Eddie Redmayne – The Theory of Everything

BEST ACTRESS
Jennifer Aniston – Cake
Marion Cotillard – Two Days, One Night
Felicity Jones – The Theory of Everything
Julianne Moore – Still Alice
Rosamund Pike – Gone Girl
Reese Witherspoon – Wild

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Josh Brolin – Inherent Vice
Robert Duvall – The Judge
Ethan Hawke – Boyhood
Edward Norton – Birdman
Mark Ruffalo – Foxcatcher
J.K. Simmons – Whiplash

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Jessica Chastain – A Most Violent Year
Keira Knightley – The Imitation Game
Emma Stone – Birdman
Meryl Streep – Into the Woods
Tilda Swinton – Snowpiercer

BEST YOUNG ACTOR/ACTRESS
Ellar Coltrane – Boyhood
Ansel Elgort – The Fault in Our Stars
Mackenzie Foy – Interstellar
Jaeden Lieberher – St. Vincent
Tony Revolori – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Quvenzhane Wallis – Annie
Noah Wiseman – The Babadook

BEST ACTING ENSEMBLE
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel
The Imitation Game
Into the Woods
Selma

BEST DIRECTOR
Wes Anderson – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Ava DuVernay – Selma
David Fincher – Gone Girl
Alejandro G. Inarritu – Birdman <–alt
Angelina Jolie – Unbroken
Richard Linklater – Boyhood

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Birdman – Alejandro G. Inarritu, Nicolas Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Jr., Armando Bo
Boyhood – Richard Linklater
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Wes Anderson, Hugo Guinness
Nightcrawler – Dan Gilroy
Whiplash – Damien Chazelle

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Gone Girl – Gillian Flynn
The Imitation Game – Graham Moore <—alt
Inherent Vice – Paul Thomas Anderson
The Theory of Everything – Anthony McCarten
Unbroken – Joel Coen & Ethan Coen, Richard LaGravenese, William Nicholson
Wild – Nick Hornby

BEST CINEMATOGRAPY
Birdman – Emmanuel Lubezki
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Robert Yeoman <—alt.
Interstellar – Hoyte Van Hoytema
Mr. Turner – Dick Pope
Unbroken – Roger Deakins

BEST ART DIRECTION
Birdman – Kevin Thompson/Production Designer, George DeTitta Jr./Set Decorator
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Adam Stockhausen/Production Designer, Anna Pinnock/Set Decorator
Inherent Vice – David Crank/Production Designer, Amy Wells/Set Decorator
Interstellar – Nathan Crowley/Production Designer, Gary Fettis/Set Decorator
Into the Woods – Dennis Gassner/Production Designer, Anna Pinnock/Set Decorator
Snowpiercer – Ondrej Nekvasil/Production Designer, Beatrice Brentnerova/Set Decorator

BEST EDITING
Birdman – Douglas Crise, Stephen Mirrione
Boyhood – Sandra Adair
Gone Girl – Kirk Baxter <—alt.
Interstellar – Lee Smith
Whiplash – Tom Cross

BEST COSTUME DESIGN
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Milena Canonero <—alt.
Inherent Vice – Mark Bridges
Into the Woods – Colleen Atwood
Maleficent – Anna B. Sheppard
Mr. Turner – Jacqueline Durran

BEST HAIR & MAKEUP
Foxcatcher <—alt.
Guardians of the Galaxy
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Into the Woods
Maleficent

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Edge of Tomorrow
Guardians of the Galaxy <—alt.
The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
Interstellar

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Big Hero 6 <–alt.
The Book of Life
The Boxtrolls
How to Train Your Dragon 2
The Lego Movie

BEST ACTION MOVIE
American Sniper
Captain America: The Winter Soldier
Edge of Tomorrow
Fury
Guardians of the Galaxy –alt.

BEST ACTOR IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Bradley Cooper – American Sniper
Tom Cruise – Edge of Tomorrow <–alt.
Chris Evans – Captain America: The Winter Soldier
Brad Pitt – Fury
Chris Pratt – Guardians of the Galaxy

BEST ACTRESS IN AN ACTION MOVIE
Emily Blunt – Edge of Tomorrow
Scarlett Johansson – Lucy <–alt.
Jennifer Lawrence – The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1
Zoe Saldana – Guardians of the Galaxy
Shailene Woodley – Divergent

BEST COMEDY
Birdman
The Grand Budapest Hotel
St. Vincent
Top Five
22 Jump Street

BEST ACTOR IN A COMEDY
Jon Favreau – Chef
Ralph Fiennes – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Michael Keaton – Birdman <—alt.
Bill Murray – St. Vincent
Chris Rock – Top Five
Channing Tatum – 22 Jump Street

BEST ACTRESS IN A COMEDY
Rose Byrne – Neighbors
Rosario Dawson – Top Five
Melissa McCarthy – St. Vincent
Jenny Slate – Obvious Child 
Kristen Wiig – The Skeleton Twins <—alt.

BEST SCI-FI/HORROR MOVIE
The Babadook
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Interstellar
Snowpiercer
Under the Skin

BEST FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM
Force Majeure
Ida
Leviathan
Two Days, One Night
Wild Tales

BEST DOCUMENTARY FEATURE
Citizenfour
Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
Jodorowsky’s Dune
Last Days in Vietnam
Life Itself
The Overnighters

BEST SONG
Big Eyes – Lana Del Rey – Big Eyes
Everything Is Awesome – Jo Li and the Lonely Island – The Lego Movie <–alt.
Glory – Common/John Legend – Selma
Lost Stars – Keira Knightley – Begin Again
Yellow Flicker Beat – Lorde – The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 1

BEST SCORE
Alexandre Desplat – The Imitation Game
Johann Johannsson – The Theory of Everything
Trent Reznor & Atticus Ross – Gone Girl
Antonio Sanchez – Birdman <—alt.
Hans Zimmer – Interstellar 

What are your predictions?

benedict-cumberbatch-as-alan-turing-in-imitation-game

The Best Actress nominees are so boss. Seriously, can’t this be the Oscar noms come Thursday?

GALECA DORIAN AWARDS NOMINATIONS: 2014/15

Film of the Year
Birdman – Fox Searchlight
Boyhood – Sundance Selects/IFC
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Pride – CBS Films

Film Performance of the Year – Actor
Steve Carell, Foxcatcher – Sony Pictures Classics
Benedict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler – Open Road
Michael Keaton, Birdman – Fox Searchlight
Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything – Universal

Film Performance of the Year – Actress
Essie Davis, The Babadook – Sundance Selects/IFC
Anne Dorval, Mommy – Roadside Attractions
Julianne Moore, Still Alice – Sony Pictures Classics
Rosamund Pike, Gone Girl – 20th Century Fox
Reese Witherspoon, Wild – Fox Searchlight

Film Director of the Year
Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
Ava DuVernay, Selma – Paramount
David Fincher, Gone Girl – 20th Century Fox
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, Birdman – Fox Searchight
Richard Linklater, Boyhood – Sundance Selects/IFC

LGBTQ Film of the Year
The Imitation Game – The Weinstein Company
Love is Strange – Sony Pictures Classics
Pride – CBS Films
Stranger by the Lake – Strand Releasing
The Way He Looks – Strand Releasing

Foreign Language Film of the Year
Force Majeure – Magnolia Pictures
Ida – Music Box Films
Mommy – Roadside Attractions
Stranger by the Lake – Strand Releasing
Two Days, One Night – Sundance Selects/IFC

Unsung Film of the Year
Obvious Child – A24
Love is Strange – Sony Pictures Classics
Pride – CBS Films
The Skeleton Twins – Roadside Attractions
Snowpiercer – Radius/TWC

Documentary of the Year
(theatrical release, TV airing or DVD release)
The Case Against 8 – HBO
CitizenFour – Radius/TWC
Elaine Stritch: Shoot Me – Sundance Selects
Life Itself – Magnolia Pictures
Regarding Susan Sontag – HBO

Visually Striking Film of the Year
(honoring a production of stunning beauty, from art direction to cinematography)
Birdman – Fox Searchlight
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Fox Searchlight
Interstellar – Paramount
Snowpiercer – Radius/TWC
Under the Skin – A24

Campy Flick of the Year
Annie
Gone Girl
Into the Woods
Maleficent
Tammy

TV Drama of the Year
Fargo – FX
The Good Wife – CBS
How To Get Away with Murder – ABC
Mad Men – AMC
The Normal Heart – HBO

TV Comedy of the Year
The Comeback – HBO
Modern Family – ABC
Orange is the New Black – Netflix
Transparent – Amazon
Veep – HBO

TV Director of the Year
Lisa Cholodenko, Olive Kitteridge – HBO
Jodie Foster, Orange is the New Black -Netflix
Andrew Haigh, Looking – HBO
Ryan Murphy, The Normal Heart – HBO
Jill Soloway, Transparent – Amazon

TV Performance of the Year – Actor
Matthew Bomer, The Normal Heart – HBO
Matthew McConaughey, True Detective – HBO
Mark Ruffalo, The Normal Heart – HBO
Kevin Spacey, House of Cards – Netflix
Jeffrey Tambor, Transparent – Amazon

TV Performance of the Year – Actress
Viola Davis, How to Get Away with Murder – ABC
Lisa Kudrow, The Comeback – HBO
Julianna Margulies, The Good Wife – CBS
Tatiana Maslany, Orphan Black – BBC America
Frances McDormand, Olive Kitteridge – HBO

TV Musical Performance of the Year
Beyonce, MTV Video Music Awards – MTV
Neil Patrick Harris, “Sugar Daddy,” The Tony Awards – CBS
Jessica Lange, “Life on Mars,” American Horror Story: Freak Show – FX
Macklemore, Ryan Lewis, Madonna, et al., “Same Love,” The Grammys – CBS
Prince, Saturday Night Live – NBC

LGBTQ TV Show of the Year
Looking – HBO
Modern Family – ABC
Orange is the New Black – Netflix
Please Like Me – Pivot
Transparent – Amazon

Unsung TV Show of the Year
Getting On – HBO
Looking – HBO
Orphan Black – BBC America
Please Like Me – Pivot
Transparent – Amazon

TV Current Affairs Show of the Year
Anderson Cooper 360 – CNN
The Colbert Report – Comedy Central
The Daily Show with Jon Stewart – Comedy Central
Last Week Tonight with John Oliver – HBO
The Rachel Maddow Show – MSNBC

Campy TV Show of the Year
American Horror Story: Freak Show
How to Get Away with Murder
Jane the Virgin
Peter Pan Live!
Penny Dreadful

Music Video of the Year
Nicki Minaj, “Anaconda”
Perfume Genius, “Queen”
Sia, “Chandelier”
Taylor Swift, “Blank Space”
Meghan Trainor, “All About That Bass”

The “We’re Wilde About You!” Rising Star Award
Ansel Elgort
Jack Falahee
Ellar Coltrane
Jack O’Connell
Gina Rodriguez
Finn Wittrock

Wilde Wit of the Year
(honoring a performer, writer or commentator whose observations both challenge and amuse)
Stephen Colbert
Rachel Maddow
Bill Maher
John Oliver
Jon Stewart

Wilde Artist of the Year
(honoring a truly groundbreaking force in the fields of film, theater and/or television)
Xavier Dolan
Neil Patrick Harris
Richard Linklater
Jill Solloway
Tilda Swinton

Timeless Award
(to an actor or performer whose exemplary career is marked by character, wisdom and wit)
George Takei

gone8

The Denver Film Critics names American Sniper tops, with Rosamund Pike Best Actress. The usual suspects otherwise, check it out here.

The Alliance of Women Film Journalists announce Boyhood tops, with Gillian Flynn taking adapted screenplay. See their winners here.

Houston goes for Boyhood, too, but names Jake Gyllenhaal Best Actor for Nightcrawler. Their full awards here.

selma33

The Central Ohio Film Critics have given Selma Picture and Director nominations.

(Press Release) Ava DuVernay’s civil rights drama Selma has been named Best Film in the Central Ohio Film Critics Association’s 13th annual awards, which recognize excellence in the film industry for 2014. The film also claimed four other awards. DuVernay was honored as Best Director and Breakthrough Film Artist. David Oyelowo was named Best Actor for his portrayal of Martin Luther King, Jr. Paul Webb won for Best Original Screenplay.

Winners were announced at a private party on January 8.

Complete list of awards:

Best Film
1. Selma
2. Whiplash
3. Snowpiercer
4. The Grand Budapest Hotel
5. Nightcrawler
6. Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
7. The Imitation Game
8. Boyhood
9. A Most Violent Year
10. Gone Girl

Best Director
-Ava DuVernay, Selma
-Runner-up: Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Actor
-David Oyelowo, Selma
-Runners-up: Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler and Michael Keaton, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Best Actress
-Essie Davis, The Babadook
-Runner-up: Scarlett Johansson, Under the Skin

Best Supporting Actor
-J.K. Simmons, Whiplash
-Runners-up: Josh Brolin, Inherent Vice and Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher

Best Supporting Actress
-Tilda Swinton, Snowpiercer
-Runner-up: Patricia Arquette, Boyhood

Best Ensemble
-The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Runners-up: Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance) and Foxcatcher

Actor of the Year (for an exemplary body of work)
-Jake Gyllenhaal, Enemy, and Nightcrawle
-Runner-up: Tilda Swinton, The Grand Budapest Hotel, Only Lovers Left Alive, Snowpiercer, and The Zero Theorem

Breakthrough Film Artist
-Ava DuVernay, Selma (for directing)
-Runner-up: Jennifer Kent, The Babadook (for directing and screenwriting)

Best Cinematography
-Robert Yeoman, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Runner-up: Daniel Landin, Under the Skin

Best Film Editing
-Tom Cross, Whiplash
-Runner-up: Douglas Crise and Stephen Mirrione, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)

Best Adapted Screenplay
-Graham Moore, The Imitation Game
-Runner-up: Bong Joon-ho and Kelly Masterson, Snowpiercer

Best Original Screenplay
-Paul Webb, Selma
-Runner-up: Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Score
-Alexandre Desplat, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Runner-up: Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Gone Girl

Best Documentary
-Finding Vivian Maier
-Runner-up: Citizenfour

Best Foreign Language Film
– We Are the Best! (Vi är bäst!)
-Runner-up: Ida

Best Animated Film
-The LEGO Movie
-Runner-up: Big Hero 6

Best Overlooked Film
-The Babadook
-Runner-up: Edge of Tomorrow

COFCA offers its congratulations to the winners.

Previous Best Film winners:
2002: Punch-Drunk Love
2003: Lost in Translation
2004: Million Dollar Baby
2005: A History of Violence
2006: Children of Men
2007: No Country for Old Men
2008: WALL·E
2009: Up in the Air
2010: Inception
2011: Drive
2012: Moonrise Kingdom
2013: Gravity

(press release, cont.)
Columbus-area critics recognized these other individual screen performers: Best Actress Essie Davis (The Babadook); Best Supporting Actor J.K. Simmons (Whiplash); Best Supporting Actress Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer); and Actor of the Year Jake Gyllenhaal for his exemplary body of work in Enemy and Nightcrawler.

The Grand Budapest Hotel received three awards, including Best Ensemble, Best Cinematography for Director of Photography Robert Yeoman, and Best Score for composer Alexandre Desplat. Desplat is a repeat COFCA winner, having also won Best Score in 2008 for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and in 2012 for Moonrise Kingdom.

Other winners include: Whiplash’s Tom Cross for Best Film Editing; The Imitation Game’s Graham Moore for Best Adapted Screenplay; Best Documentary Finding Vivian Maier; Best Foreign Language Film We Are the Best! (Vi är bäst!); Best Animated Film The LEGO Movie; and The Babadook as Best Overlooked Film.

Founded in 2002, the Central Ohio Film Critics Association is comprised of film critics based in Columbus, Ohio and the surrounding areas. Its membership consists of 21 print, radio, television, and internet critics. COFCA’s official website at www.cofca.org contains links to member reviews and past award winners.

The complete list of members and their affiliations:

Richard Ades (Columbus Free Press); Kevin Carr (www.7mpictures.com, FilmSchoolRejects.com); Bill Clark (www.fromthebalcony.com); Olie Coen (Archer Avenue, DVD Talk); John DeSando (90.5 WCBE); Frank Gabrenya (The Columbus Dispatch); James Hansen (Out 1 Film Journal); Nicholas Herum (Columbus Underground; Movies Hate You Too); Brad Keefe (Columbus Alive); Kristin Dreyer Kramer (NightsAndWeekends.com, 90.5 WCBE); Joyce Long (Freelance); Rico Long (Freelance); Hope Madden (Columbus Underground and MaddWolf.com); Paul Markoff (WOCC-TV3; Otterbein TV); David Medsker (Bullz-Eye.com); Lori Pearson (Kids-in-Mind.com, critics.com); Mark Pfeiffer (Reel Times: Reflections on Cinema; WOCC-TV3; Otterbein TV); Melissa Starker (Columbus Alive, The Columbus Dispatch); George Wolf (Columbus Radio Group and MaddWolf.com); Jason Zingale (Bullz-Eye.com); Nathan Zoebl (PictureShowPundits.com).)

wild fea

Scott Feinberg reports:

The nominees are:

Gone Girl, adapted by Gillian Flynn from her novel of the same name
The Imitation Game, adapted by Graham Moore from Andrew Hodges’ book Alan Turing: The Enigma
Inherent Vice, adapted by Paul Thomas Anderson from Thomas Pynchon’s novel of the same name
The Theory of Everything, adapted by Andrew McCarten from Jane Hawking’s Traveling to Infinity: My Life with Stephen
Wild, adapted by Nick Hornby from Cheryl Strayed’s memoir of the same name

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Film criticism has been taking a hit for the past ten years since the internet exploded. We’ve been writing about this subject for years because we’ve been here from the beginning of the sweeping change.  Filmmakers have noticed because the old guard film critics were careful about creating and maintaining the legacies of the best ones. Not all of them, of course, but you could always count on a handful of film critics to preserve and encourage filmmakers like Martin Scorsese, like Jane Campion, like David Cronenberg.

When AwardsDaily began in 1999 (as Oscarwatch) one of the reasons I started was to look at the vast disconnect between what the critics said was great and what the Oscar voters said was great. The industry was never going to impact the critics but the critics could and did impact the Oscars, going all the way back to the 1930s. Still, when looking at Oscar history there were these major upsets that drove the frustration critics had with the Oscars, some of whom just wrote them off outright. Raging Bull versus Ordinary People, Goodfellas versus Dances with Wolves, Apocalypse Now versus Kramer vs. Kramer.  My aim was to track the Oscar race from the beginning of the year through to the end to see what influenced them and why their choices differed radically from the critics.

I built charts, I looked at reviews. For the first five years of my site (readers can attest to this) I never even wrote my own reviews or film analysis much at all. I copied and pasted quotes from critics, emphasizing the films the critics said were good, mostly.  I did not spend much time reporting on what they thought was bad unless those films made it into the race.

I have always had a high respect for film critics, so much so that I don’t even call myself one. And I could. Easily. I wrote film reviews for a paycheck for the Santa Monica Mirror for years. I write reviews for my site now. I belong to the Alliance of Women Film Journalists (though I do not vote on their awards) and I’m blurbed on film posters and advertising by studios. In all ways I could do what so many I’ve watched do over the past 16 years – call myself a critic, or even a hybrid critic. I could belong to the Broadcast Film Critics and get free screeners, invites to fancy parties and a ticket to the show. I don’t because I personally draw that line out of respect for the people whose reviews have shaped the way I look at film.

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I spent the first five years online, from 1994 to 1998, just writing about movies on a listserv called Cinema-l where we would all pretend to be film critics, day in and day out. I call it my blogging school. From there, I launched the website Cinescene.com, which was just a place to discuss movies and feature film reviews by those of us on Cinema-l. But it wasn’t going to pay the bills so instead I launched a site I hoped would, Oscarwatch.com. From then on, my business was writing about the Oscar race.

The old timers, mostly, were the ones I paid attention to early on, like Todd McCarthy and Kirk Honeycutt but of course, Kenneth Turan, Roger Ebert, Janet Maslin (back then), Manohla Dargis (who worked at LA Weekly), Owen Gleibermann and Lisa Schwarzbaum at Entertainment Weekly, David Thomson, David Edelstein, Joe Morgenstern, Jonathan Rosenbaum – I read their reviews and considered their opinions. Sometimes I agreed, sometimes I didn’t but there was no doubt that they mattered back then. They mattered and I made sure they mattered to the awards race.  It was the one thing I tried to do from day one.

But things started to change and change dramatically. David Cronenberg noticed:

“I think the role of the critic has been very diminished, because you get a lot of people who set themselves up as critics by having a website where it says that they’re a critic.”

“There are legitimate critics who have actually paid their dues and worked hard and are in a legitimate website connected perhaps with a newspaper or perhaps not … Then there are all these other people who just say they’re critics and you read their writing and they can’t write, or they can write and their writing reveals that they’re quite stupid and ignorant.”

No movie is a more stark reminder of how much things changed than the way the critics responded to Maps to the Stars, a film that would have needed the careful observations of a small group of astute critics to notice just how great it is. If you count on audience testing, which is essentially what modern day film criticism has become, you’re likely to get an opinion that is somewhere along the lines of a Cinemascore rating.

When I first began I had the freedom of quoting from the major critics because they were the only ones who were putting out reviews. But as things began to change and their jobs began to vanish I had to dig out those reviews where I could find them. Metacritic used to be a place that selected the real critics from the noobs. And Rotten Tomatoes a more generalized summation of what modern film criticism is. My longtime readers know I’ve been on this topic for years now. But as the major film critics began losing their jobs Metacritic kept the name-brand venues but not the critics. Since those veteran critics were gradually replaced by noobs, things eventually collapsed all around so that there was no distinction anymore between Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes. I still use both sites for different reasons but I no longer see one as being all that different from the other.

I use Rotten Tomatoes primarily to look at the negative scores and Metacritic to find the best written reviews.

When the National Society of Film Critics announced Goodbye to Language their top pick, edging out Boyhood by one vote, I didn’t think much of it except to note that in the years I’ve been doing my site, the National Society was one of the major groups that’s always been around. One thing you could count on with them was that they were going to pick a film that was highly praised by film critics. The part of it that I paid attention to was the low score of Godard’s film, at 72, which is on par with The Imitation Game and The Theory of Everything.

I said nothing more beyond that. I made no judgments on them. I just thought, huh. That’s interesting. I was not caught up in this entanglement on Twitter. I did not say anything disparaging about them at all. Yet somehow I got called out on Twitter by Glenn Kenny who eventually stated I was anti-art, combining my observations with the two other people who really did outwardly criticize the National Society of Film Critics, David Poland and Scott Feinberg, the whole ugly mess reported on Kris Tapley’s site – Tapley taking the side of Kenny and the many who stood up with their flag of freedom for the right of the NSFC to pick something “outside the box.”

I didn’t mind the selection of Goodbye to Language. I sat next to David Poland in Cannes and I know he thought it was weird. I thought it was a hilarious, absurdist experimental film. I had no problem with it – I didn’t walk outside raving about it because I will be the first to admit I didn’t fully understand it. This is why I respect film critics. In the old days I might dig out a wonderful review by someone smart and read about why they found Goodbye to Language so great. The last thing I did was shit on their choice and yet I find myself being called anti-art.

The only thing that makes me WANT to criticize their choice is the way the critics are once again rallying together like an oppressed group under siege by the awards bloggers. I remember Sam Adams puffing up and freaking out over Ryan’s joke about the Utah film critics coming from the Land of White people. Their reaction reminded me of the kid at school who does nothing but terrorize his classmates and when you say a single negative thing about him he starts to cry. Film critics are CRITICS. They don’t hold back when it suits them. They shred movies when it suits them. And they can’t handle a little criticism? RULLY?

But this wasn’t my fight. I would never fight them because I didn’t think it was a bad choice, not like the New York Film Critics terrible choice of American Hustle last year. If I thought it was a bad or “colorful” or even pretentious vote I would have said so. But I didn’t. Yet I got roped into the whole thing as though I did. Glenn Kenny said it wasn’t my “finest hour.” Again, I didn’t sling shit in this particular monkey cage. I have way too much respect for Jean-Luc Godard to ever criticize his getting any award. Ever.

So let me talk about what I do think about it – it marked, for me, the end of film criticism as mattering to me in terms of the awards race, which is what I do for a living. I write about the Oscars and the things that impact them. I get money to write about the Oscars and I do it to support my daughter as a single parent for her entire life – she’s now 16 years old. Noting that a film that scored 72 on Metacritic was named best film of the year stopped me. It seemed out of step with the National Society’s OWN history. As follows:

1990 Goodfellas – 89
1991 Life Is Sweet – 88
1992 Unforgiven – 82
1993 Schindler’s List – 93
1994 Pulp Fiction – 94
1995 Babe – 83
1996 Breaking the Waves – 76
1997 L.A. Confidential — 90
1998 Out of Sight – 85
1999 Being John Malkovich – 90
Topsy-Turvy 90
2000 Yi Yi: A One and a Two (Yi yi) – 92
2001 Mulholland Drive – 81
2002 The Pianist – 85
2003 American Splendor – 90
2004 Million Dollar Baby – 86
2005 Capote – 88
2006 Pan’s Labyrinth (El laberinto del fauno) – 98
2007 There Will Be Blood – 92
2008 Waltz with Bashir (Vals im Bashir) – 91
2009 The Hurt Locker – 94
2010 The Social Network – 95
2011 Melancholia – 80
2012 Amour – 94
2013 Inside Llewyn Davis – 92
2014 Goodbye to Language – 72

We in the Oscar business follow what the critics say, or I have anyway, for years now. My only point that could have been read as a negative was that I said it makes it harder for film reviews to matter — IN THE OSCAR RACE. So if Goodbye to Language can win top honors with a score of 72 on Metacritic, why can’t Unbroken then also be considered with a score of 59 on Metacritic? This is essentially what the studios would prefer, by the way, for the critics (old school film critics) to have no say in how things in the Oscar race go.

It is, perhaps, the height of irony that after 16 years of being the only one in my industry to praise the critics, to quote them, to value the good ones – and yes, to sometimes battle with their choices – that I would be called out as someone who doesn’t respect their choice this time around.

I look TO THEM for guidance as to what films are the best. I use their reviews as a guideline for that. The face of film criticism has changed so dramatically you can see the last bastion of what it used to be in the National Society of Film Critics. They represent the old world.

For my purposes, their choice kind of eliminated the argument I make every year that their critical consensus ought to matter. I didn’t invent their awards. They’ve been giving them out on their own for years. If a competition for best of the year is anti-art then you could say these critics groups are anti-art. I didn’t force the New York Film Critics to push their announcement date back so that they could be FIRST in the awards race. They did that. I didn’t inject any sort of judgment on the Los Angeles Film Critics when they decided to purposely go against the awards consensus and NOT choose Zero Dark Thirty in 2012.

The awards race is shaped BY THEM – or it used to be. When they reject that consensus, when they reject their anointed darling in a given year JUST BECAUSE it’s headed for Best Picture they are only rebelling against themselves. We in the Oscar field didn’t tell them Boyhood should get 100% on Metacritic. It just did. They did it. They’re the ones that, in unison, declared that film best. We in the awards race then take their lead and say, okay, this is the one the critics have declared — unanimously — the best of the year.

But it is the height of presumptuousness to think I give two shits or a single fuck what they pick in a given year. I follow them. I don’t expect them to follow me. And they wouldn’t even if I did.

That choice by the NSFC tells me that critics scores don’t matter. Unanimous votes don’t matter. When the AFI put out their list of the Best Films of 2014 they included three films that the critics didn’t even like. I criticized THAT choice because it WENT AGAINST what I value in the race, that the opinion of critics matter.

I’m guessing by their revolutionary war battle cry that they don’t want their opinions to matter to me, to the awards race. Okay? It’s not like anyone thought the NSFC was the Critics Choice or anything. We’ve always regarded them as a mostly eclectic, outside the box group. They got far more shit for picking Yi Yi – a choice that resonated (not with me, mind you) for years after that. They were criticized by film critics loudly and vocally for that obscure choice. Goodbye to Language is child’s play compared to Yi Yi.

David Cronenberg is right. The modern version of film criticism is pooled over at sites like The Dissolve and RogerEbert.com where a reasonably sized community of like-minded individuals spend their days talking about movies. It’s probably a refreshing place to be. But film criticism, the way I used to know it, does not exist anymore. Stick a fork in it.

Will I still take film criticism seriously? Sure. Do I think it has the power it once had over the Oscar race? If anything, the new breed of film critics represent audiences, probably, more than critics particularly — so yeah, that won’t change. Just the particular kinds of tastes and agendas will change. Marketing will have more control. The studios will gain power over critics because to a certain extent they can control them. I’m lucky that I won’t be in this job much longer so very little of it matters to me anymore at all. We’re still talking about a mostly male, mostly white group of people voting on awards that revolve around the mostly male, mostly white protagonists.

Here are the members of the NSFC. I would say to them, if you can’t handle a little criticism about your choices perhaps you are in the wrong profession.

SAM ADAMS – Criticwire, The Dissolve
JOHN ANDERSON – Newsday, Variety, Wall Street Journal
MELISSA ANDERSON – Artforum
DAVID ANSEN – freelance
GARY ARNOLD – freelance
SHEILA BENSON – Critic Quality Feed, Seattle Weekly
JAMI BERNARD – Movie City News
RICHARD BRODY – The New Yorker
TY BURR – Boston Globe
JUSTIN CHANG – Variety
GODFREY CHESHIRE – RogerEbert.com
MIKE CLARK – Home Media Magazine
RICHARD CORLISS – Time
DAVID DENBY – The New Yorker
MORRIS DICKSTEIN – Dissent
DAVID EDELSTEIN – New York Magazine, CBS Sunday Morning, NPR
STEVE ERICKSON – L.A. Magazine
SCOTT FOUNDAS – Variety
OWEN GLEIBERMAN – bbc.com/culture
MOLLY HASKELL – Town & Country
J. HOBERMAN – freelance
RICHARD T. JAMESON – Straight Shooting, Queen Anne News
DAVE KEHR – davekehr.com
BEN KENIGSBERG – freelance
LISA KENNEDY – Denver Post
PETER KEOUGH – Boston Globe
STUART KLAWANS – The Nation
ANDY KLEIN – L.A. Times Community Papers, KPCC-FM
NATHAN LEE – Film Comment
EMANUEL LEVY – Financial Times, EmanuelLevy.com
DENNIS LIM – freelance
TODD McCARTHY – Hollywood Reporter
JOE MORGENSTERN – Wall Street Journal
WESLEY MORRIS – Grantland
ROB NELSON – Minneapolis Star-Tribune
GERALD PEARY – The Arts Fuse
MARY POLS – freelance
JOHN POWERS – Vogue, NPR
PETER RAINER – Christian Science Monitor, NPR, KCET-TV
NICOLAS RAPOLD – L Magazine
STEVEN REA – Philadelphia Inquirer
ELEANOR RINGEL – Atlanta Business Chronicle
JONATHAN ROSENBAUM – jonathanrosenbaum.com
RICHARD SCHICKEL – Truthdig
LISA SCHWARZBAUM – TV Guide
HENRY SHEEHAN – KPCC-FM, CriticsAGoGo.com
MICHAEL SICINSKI – Nashville Scene
MICHAEL SRAGOW – Film Comment
CHUCK STEPHENS – Film Comment
DAVID STERRITT – Tikkun
AMY TAUBIN – Film Comment
CHARLES TAYLOR – The Yale Review
ELLA TAYLOR – NPR.org
PETER TRAVERS – Rolling Stone
KENNETH TURAN – Los Angeles Times
JAMES VERNIERE – Boston Herald
MICHAEL WILMINGTON – Movie City News
WILLIAM WOLF – wolfentertainmentguide.com
STEPHANIE ZACHAREK – The Village Voice

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The 2014 Central Ohio Film Critics Association awards nominees are:

Best Film
-Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Boyhood
-Gone Girl
-The Grand Budapest Hotel
-The Imitation Game
-A Most Violent Year
-Nightcrawler
-Selma
-Snowpiercer
-Whiplash

Best Director
-Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Damien Chazelle, Whiplash
-Ava DuVernay, Selma
-Alejandro González Iñárritu, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of
Ignorance)
-Richard Linklater, Boyhood

Best Actor
-Ralph Fiennes, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler
-Michael Keaton, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-David Oyelowo, Selma
-Eddie Redmayne, The Theory of Everything

Best Actress
-Essie Davis, The Babadook
-Scarlett Johansson, Under the Skin
-Felicity Jones, The Theory of Everything
-Rosamund Pike, Gone Girl
-Reese Witherspoon, Wild

Best Supporting Actor
-Josh Brolin, Inherent Vice
-Ethan Hawke, Boyhood
-Edward Norton, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher
-J.K. Simmons, Whiplash

Best Supporting Actress
-Patricia Arquette, Boyhood
-Jessica Chastain, A Most Violent Year
-Keira Knightley, The Imitation Game
-Emma Stone, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Tilda Swinton, Snowpiercer

Best Ensemble
-Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Foxcatcher
-Gone Girl
-The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Guardians of the Galaxy

Actor of the Year (for an exemplary body of work)
-Jessica Chastain (The Disappearance of Eleanor Rigby, Interstellar, Miss
Julie, and A Most Violent Year)
-Benedict Cumberbatch (The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies and The
Imitation Game)
-Jake Gyllenhaal (Enemy and Nightcrawler)
-Chris Pratt (Guardians of the Galaxy and The LEGO Movie)
-Tilda Swinton (The Grand Budapest Hotel, Only Lovers Left Alive,
Snowpiercer, and The Zero Theorem)

Breakthrough Film Artist
-Damien Chazelle, Whiplash – (for directing and screenwriting)
-Ava DuVernay, Selma – (for directing)
-Jennifer Kent, The Babadook – (for directing and screenwriting)
-Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Belle and Beyond the Lights – (for acting)
-Justin Simien, Dear White People – (for directing and screenwriting)

Best Cinematography
-Benoît Delhomme, The Theory of Everything
-Hoyte Van Hoytema, Interstellar
-Daniel Landin, Under the Skin
-Emmanuel Lubezki, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Robert Yeoman, The Grand Budapest Hotel

Best Film Editing
-Sandra Adair, Boyhood
-Spencer Averick, Selma
-Kirk Baxter, Gone Girl
-Douglas Crise and Stephen Mirrione, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue
of Ignorance)
-Tom Cross, Whiplash

Best Adapted Screenplay
-Paul Thomas Anderson, Inherent Vice
-Bong Joon-ho and Kelly Masterson, Snowpiercer
-Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl
-Nick Hornby, Wild
-Graham Moore, The Imitation Game

Best Original Screenplay
-Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-J.C. Chandor, A Most Violent Year
-Damien Chazelle, Whiplash
-Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, and
Armando Bo, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Paul Webb, Selma

Best Score
-Alexandre Desplat, The Grand Budapest Hotel
-Jóhann Jóhannsson, The Theory of Everything
-Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Gone Girl
-Antonio Sanchez, Birdman or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)
-Hans Zimmer, Interstellar

Best Documentary
-Citizenfour
-Dinosaur 13
-Finding Vivian Maier
-Jodorowsky’s Dune
-Life Itself

Best Foreign Language Film
-Force Majeure (Turist)
-A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night
-Ida
-Two Days, One Night (Deux jours, une nuit)
-We Are the Best! (Vi är bäst!)

Best Animated Film
-Big Hero 6
-The Book of Life
-The Boxtrolls
-How to Train Your Dragon 2
-The LEGO Movie

Best Overlooked Film
-The Babadook
-Blue Ruin
-Edge of Tomorrow
-Enemy
-Locke

COFCA offers its congratulations to the nominees.

Previous Best Film winners:

2002: Punch-Drunk Love
2003: Lost in Translation
2004: Million Dollar Baby
2005: A History of Violence
2006: Children of Men
2007: No Country for Old Men
2008: WALL·E
2009: Up in the Air
2010: Inception
2011: Drive
2012: Moonrise Kingdom
2013: Gravity

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BEST PICTURE
*1. Goodbye to Language 25 (Jean-Luc Godard)
2. Boyhood 24 (Richard Linklater)
3. Birdman 10 (Alejandro G. Iñárritu)
3. Mr. Turner 10 (Mike Leigh)

BEST DIRECTOR
*1. Richard Linklater 36 (Boyhood)
2. Jean-Luc Godard 17 (Goodbye to Language)
3. Mike Leigh 12 (Mr. Turner)

BEST NON-FICTION FILM
*1. Citizenfour 56 (Laura Poitras)
2. National Gallery 19 (Frederick Wiseman)
3. The Overnighters 17 (Jesse Moss)

BEST SCREENPLAY
*1. The Grand Budapest Hotel 24 (Wes Anderson)
2. Inherent Vice 15 (Paul Thomas Anderson)
2. Birdman 15 (four co-writers)

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
*1. Mr. Turner 33 (Dick Pope)
2. The Immigrant 27 (Darius Khondji)
3. Goodbye to Language 9 (Fabrice Aragno)

BEST ACTOR
*1.Timothy Spall 31 (Mr. Turner)
2. Tom Hardy 10 (Locke)
3. Joaquin Phoenix 9 (Inherent Vice)
3. Ralph Fiennes 9 (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

BEST ACTRESS
*1. Marion Cotillard 80 (Two Days, One Night, The Immigrant)
2. Julianne Moore 35 (Still Alice)
3. Scarlett Johansson 21 (Lucy; Under the Skin)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
*1. J.K. Simmons 24 (Whiplash)
2. Mark Ruffalo 21 (Foxcatcher)
3. Edward Norton 16 (Birdman)

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
*1. Patricia Arquette 26 (Boyhood)
2. Agata Kulesza 18 (Ida)
3. Rene Russo 9 (Nightcrawler)

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Last year, all nine Best Picture nominees were on SEFCA’s list.

Thanks Paddy:

Best Film
1. The Grand Budapest Hotel
2. Boyhood
3. Birdman
4. Whiplash
5. The Imitation Game
6. Gone Girl
7. Snowpiercer
8. Nightcrawler
9. Foxcatcher
10. The Theory of Everything

Best Director
1. Richard Linklater (Boyhood)
2. Wes Anderson (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

Best Actor
1. Michael Keaton (Birdman)
2. Eddie Redmayne (The Theory of Everything)

Best Actress
1. Julianne Moore (Still Alice)
2. Reese Witherspoon (Wild)

Best Supporting Actor
1. J. K. Simmons (Whiplash)
2. Edward Norton (Birdman)

Best Supporting Actress
1. Patricia Arquette (Boyhood)
2. Tilda Swinton (Snowpiercer)

Best Original Screenplay
1. Wes Anderson and Hugo Guinness (The Grand Budapest Hotel)
2. Armando Bo, Alexander Dinelaris, Nicolas Giacobone and Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (Birdman)

Best Adapted Screenplay
1. Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)
2. Nick Hornby (Wild)

Best Cinematography
1. Emmanuel Lubezki (Birdman)
2. Robert D. Yeoman (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

Best Ensemble
1. The Grand Budapest Hotel
2. Birdman

Best Animated Film
1. The LEGO Movie
2. Big Hero 6

Best Documentary
1. Life Itself
2. Citizenfour

Best Foreign Language Film
1. Force Majeure
2. Ida

The Gene Wyatt Award for the Film that Best Evokes the Spirit of the South
1. Selma
2. Cold in July

gone nightcrawler

(thanks to Paddy @screenonscreen)

Best Film
Gone Girl

Best Director
Dan Gilroy (Nightcrawler)

Best Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler)

Best Actress
Rosamund Pike (Gone Girl)

Best Supporting Actor
J. K. Simmons (Whiplash)

Best Supporting Actress
Patricia Arquette (Boyhood)
Jessica Chastain (A Most Violent Year)

Best Screenplay
Dan Gilroy (Nightcrawler)

Best Cinematography
Hoyte van Hoytema (Interstellar)

Best Production Design
Adam Stockhausen (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

Best Visual Effects
Interstellar

Best Ensemble Cast
Guardians of the Galaxy

Best Animated Movie
Big Hero 6

Best Documentary
Citizenfour

Best Youth Performance
Ellar Coltrane (Boyhood)

grand-budapest_2813768b

BEST PICTURE
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel

BEST ACTOR
Jake Gyllenhaal – Nightcrawler
Michael Keaton – Birdman
Eddie Redmayne – The Theory of Everything

BEST ACTRESS
Julianne Moore – Still Alice
Rosamund Pike – Gone Girl
Reese Witherspoon – Wild

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
Edward Norton – Birdman
Mark Ruffalo – Foxcatcher
J.K. Simmons – Whiplash

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Jessica Chastain – A Most Violent Year
Emma Stone – Birdman

BEST ENSEMBLE
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel

BEST DIRECTOR
Wes Anderson – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Alejandro Gonzalez Iñárritu – Birdman
Richard Linklater – Boyhood

BEST ORIGINAL SCREENPLAY
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel

BEST ADAPTED SCREENPLAY
Gone Girl
Inherent Vice
The Theory of Everything

BEST CINEMATOGRAPHY
Birdman
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Interstellar

BEST VISUAL EFFECTS
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Guardians of the Galaxy
Interstellar

BEST ART DIRECTION/PRODUCTION DESIGN
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Interstellar
Into the Woods

BEST SCORE
Gone Girl
Interstellar
Under the Skin

BEST DOCUMENTARY
Citizenfour
Life Itself
Jodorowsky’s Dune

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
Ida (Poland)
Force Majeure (Sweden)
The Raid 2 (Indonesia)

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
Big Hero 6
How to Train Your Dragon 2
The Lego Movie

PAULINE KAEL BREAKOUT AWARD
Jennifer Kent – The Babadook
Damien Chazelle – Whiplash
Gugu Mbatha-Raw – Belle/Beyond the Lights

DAWN PLANET APES MOV

Houston critics, as follows.

Best Picture
A Most Violent Year, A24 Films
Birdman, Fox Searchlight Pictures
Boyhood, IFC Films
Guardians of the Galaxy, Marvel
Inherent Vice, Warner Bros.
Nightcrawler, Open Road Films
Selma
The Grand Budapest Hotel, Fox Searchlight Pictures
The Imitation Game, The Weinstein Compaany
Whiplash, Sony Pictures Classics

Director
Alejandro G. Iñárritu, Birdman
Damien Chazelle, Whiplash
Paul Thomas Anderson, Inherent Vice
Richard Linklater, Boyhood
Wes Anderson, The Grand Budapest Hotel

Actor
Bendict Cumberbatch, The Imitation Game
Eddie Redmayne, Theory Of Everything
Jake Gyllenhaal, Nightcrawler
Michael Keaton, Birdman
Tom Hardy, Locke

Actress
Essie Davis, The Babadook
Felicity Jones, The Theory of Everything
Julianne Moore, Still Alice
Marion Cotillard, Two Days, One Night
Reese Witherspoon, Wild

Supporting Actor
Andy Serkis, Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
Edward Norton, Birdman
Ethan Hawke, Boyhood
J.K. Simmons, Whiplash
Josh Brolin, Inherent Vice
Mark Ruffalo, Foxcatcher

Supporting Actress
Emma Stone, Birdman
Jessica Chastain, A Most Violent Year
Kiera Knightley, The Imitation Game
Patricia Arquette, Boyhood
Tilda Swinton, Snowpiercer

Screenplay
Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolas Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris Jr., Armando Bo; Birdman
Damien Chazelle, Whiplash
Dan Gilroy, Nightcrawler
Richard Linklater, Boyhood
Wes Anderson, The Grand Budpest Hotel

Animated
Big Hero 6
How to Train Your Dragon 2
The Book of Love
The Boxtrolls
The Lego Movie

Cinematography
Emmanuel Lubezki, Birdman
Hoyte van Hoytema, Interstellar
Robert Elswit, Nightcrawler
Robert Yeoman, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Roger Deakins, Unbroken

Documentary
Citizenfour
Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
Jodorowsky’s Dune
Life Itself
The Overnighters

Foreign
Force Majeure
Ida
Leviathan
The Raid 2
Two Days, One Night

Original Score
Alexander Desplat, The Imitation Game
Alexandre Desplat, The Grand Budapest Hotel
Antonio Sánchez, Birdman
Hans Zimmer, Interstellar
Johann Johannson, The Theory of Everything

Original Song
Big Eyes, Big Eyes
Everything is Awesome, The Lego Movie
Glory, Selma
I’m Not Going to Miss You, Glen Campbell: I’ll Be Me
Lost Stars, Begin Again

Texas Independent Film Award
Above All Else
Boyhood
Hellion
Joe
No No: A Dockumentary
Stop the Pounding Heart

Best Poster
Birdman
Godzilla, IMAX
Guardians of the Galaxy, Primary Theatrical
Inherent Vice
The Grand Budapest Hotel

Technical Achievement
Birdman – Creation of single long take for bulk of film
Boyhood – Filming over 12 years
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes – creation of ape characters

Worst Film of the Year
Blended
Dumb and Dumber To
Left Behind
The Identical
Transformers: Age of Extinction

Cannes 2014: Mr Turner

Their nominations as follows:

35th LONDON CRITICS’ CIRCLE FILM AWARDS NOMINATIONS

FILM OF THE YEAR
Birdman
Boyhood
The Grand Budapest Hotel
Ida
Leviathan
Mr Turner
Nightcrawler
The Theory of Everything
Under the Skin
Whiplash

FOREIGN LANGUAGE FILM OF THE YEAR
Ida
Leviathan
Norte, The End of History
Two Days, One Night
Winter Sleep

BRITISH FILM OF THE YEAR
The Imitation Game
Mr Turner
Pride
The Theory of Everything
Under the Skin

DOCUMENTARY OF THE YEAR
20,000 Days on Earth
Citizenfour
Manakamana
Next Goal Wins
Night Will Fall

ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Benedict Cumberbatch – The Imitation Game
Jake Gyllenhaal – Nightcrawler
Michael Keaton – Birdman
Eddie Redmayne – The Theory of Everything
Timothy Spall – Mr Turner

ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Marion Cotillard – Two Days, One Night
Essie Davis – The Babadook
Scarlett Johansson – Under the Skin
Julianne Moore – Maps to the Stars
Julianne Moore – Still Alice

SUPPORTING ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Riz Ahmed – Nightcrawler
Ethan Hawke – Boyhood
Edward Norton – Birdman
Mark Ruffalo – Foxcatcher
JK Simmons – Whiplash

SUPPORTING ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Patricia Arquette – Boyhood
Marion Bailey – Mr Turner
Jessica Chastain – A Most Violent Year
Agata Kulesza – Ida
Emma Stone – Birdman

BRITISH ACTOR OF THE YEAR
Benedict Cumberbatch – The Imitation Game
Tom Hardy – Locke, The Drop
Jack O’Connell – Starred Up, ’71 & Unbroken
Eddie Redmayne – The Theory of Everything
Timothy Spall – Mr Turner

BRITISH ACTRESS OF THE YEAR
Emily Blunt – Into the Woods & Edge of Tomorrow
Felicity Jones – The Theory of Everything
Keira Knightley – The Imitation Game, Begin Again & Say When
Gugu Mbatha-Raw – Belle
Rosamund Pike – Gone Girl & What We Did on Our Holiday

YOUNG BRITISH PERFORMER OF THE YEAR
Daniel Huttlestone – Into the Woods
Alex Lawther – The Imitation Game
Corey McKinley – ’71
Will Poulter – The Maze Runner & Plastic
Saoirse Ronan – The Grand Budapest Hotel

DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Wes Anderson – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Jonathan Glazer – Under the Skin
Alejandro G Iñárritu – Birdman
Richard Linklater – Boyhood
Mike Leigh – Mr Turner

SCREENWRITER OF THE YEAR
Wes Anderson – The Grand Budapest Hotel
Damien Chazelle – Whiplash
Dan Gilroy – Nightcrawler
Alejandro G Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris & Armando Bo – Birdman
Richard Linklater – Boyhood

BREAKTHROUGH BRITISH FILMMAKER
Hossein Amini – The Two Faces of January
Elaine Constantine – Northern Soul
Yann Demange – ’71
Iain Forsyth & Jane Pollard – 20,000 Days on Earth
James Kent – Testament of Youth

TECHNICAL ACHIEVEMENT AWARD
’71 – Chris Wyatt, editing
Birdman – Emmanuel Lubezki, cinematography
Dawn of the Planet of the Apes – Joe Letteri, visual effects
The Grand Budapest Hotel – Adam Stockhausen, production design
Inherent Vice – Mark Bridges, costumes
Leviathan – Mikhail Krichman, cinematography
Mr Turner – Dick Pope, cinematography
A Most Violent Year – Kasia Walicka-Maimone, costumes
Under the Skin – Mica Levi, score
Whiplash – Tom Cross, editing

still-of-ethan-hawke-and-lorelei-linklater-in-boyhood-(2014)-large-picture

BEST PICTURE
“Boyhood” (Mongrel Media)
Runners-up
“The Grand Budapest Hotel” (Fox Searchlight)
“Inherent Vice” (Warner Bros.)

BEST ACTOR
Tom Hardy, “Locke”
Runners-up
Ralph Fiennes, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Jake Gyllenhaal, “Nightcrawler”

BEST ACTRESS
Marion Cotillard, “The Immigrant”
Runners-up
Julianne Moore, “Still Alice”
Reese Witherspoon, “Wild”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR
J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”
Runners-up
Josh Brolin, “Inherent Vice”
Edward Norton, “Birdman Or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance)”

BEST SUPPORTING ACTRESS
Patricia Arquette, “Boyhood”
Runners-up
Tilda Swinton, “Snowpiercer”
Katherine Waterston, “Inherent Vice”

BEST DIRECTOR
Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”
Runners-up
Paul Thomas Anderson, “Inherent Vice”
Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

BEST SCREENPLAY, ADAPTED OR ORIGINAL
“The Grand Budapest Hotel”, screenplay by Wes Anderson
from a story by Wes Anderson & Hugo Guinness
Runners-up
“Boyhood”, written by Richard Linklater
“Inherent Vice”, screenplay by Paul Thomas Anderson
based on the novel by Thomas Pynchon

BEST FIRST FEATURE
“The Lunchbox”, directed by Ritesh Batra
Runners-up
“John Wick”, directed by Chad Stahelski
“Nightcrawler”, directed by Dan Gilroy

BEST ANIMATED FEATURE
“The Tale of the Princess Kaguya” (GKids)
Runners-up
“Big Hero 6” (Walt Disney Studios)
“How to Train Your Dragon 2” (20th Century Fox)
“The Lego Movie” (Warner Bros.)

BEST FOREIGN-LANGUAGE FILM
“Force Majeure” (filmswelike)
Runners-up
“Ida” (filmswelike)
“Leviathan” (Mongrel Media)

BEST DOCUMENTARY
“The Overnighters” (filmswelike)
Runners-up
“Citizenfour” (Entertainment One)
“Manakamana” (filmswelike)

JAY SCOTT PRIZE FOR AN EMERGING ARTIST
Albert Shin, director of “In Her Place”

Nightcrawler-Jake-Gyllenhaal-and-Rene-Russo-850x560

Thanks to Paddy at ScreenOnScreen

Best Picture
Nightcrawler

Best Director
Dan Gilroy (Nightcrawler)

Best Actor
Jake Gyllenhaal (Nightcrawler)

Best Actress
Marion Cotillard (Two Days, One Night)

Best Supporting Actor
Mark Ruffalo (Foxcatcher)

Best Supporting Actress
Rene Russo (Nightcrawler)

Best Original Screenplay
Dan Gilroy (Nightcrawler)

Best Adapted Screenplay
Gillian Flynn (Gone Girl)

Best Cinematography
Robert Elswit (Nightcrawler)

Best Editing
James Herbert and Laura Jennings (Edge of Tomorrow)

Best Production Design
Anna Pinnock and Adam Stockhausen (The Grand Budapest Hotel)

Best Score
James Newton Howard (Nightcrawler)

Best Ensemble
Birdman

Best Animated Film
The Boxtrolls

Best Documentary
Citizenfour

Best Foreign Language Film
Force Majeure

Body of Work
Willem Dafoe (The Fault in Our Stars / The Grand Budapest Hotel / John Wick / A Most Wanted Man / Nymphomaniac Vol. II)

Boyhood3

Best Film: “Boyhood”
Best Director:
Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu (“Birdman”)
Best Actor: Jake Gyllenhaal (“Nightcrawler”)
Best Actress: Rosamund Pike (“Gone Girl”)
Best Supporting Actor: J.K. Simmons (“Whiplash”)
Best Supporting Actress: Patricia Arquette (“Boyhood”)
Best Original Screenplay: “Birdman” (Alejandro González Iñárritu, Nicolás Giacobone, Alexander Dinelaris, Armando Bo
Best Adapted Screenplay: “Gone Girl” (Gillian Flynn)
Best Cinematography: “Birdman” (Emmanuel Lubezki)
Best Visual Effects: “Interstellar”
Best Musical Score: “Birdman”
Best Soundtrack:
“Guardians of the Galaxy”
Best Art Direction: “The Grand Budapest Hotel”
Best Animated Film: “The Lego Movie”
Best Art-House or Festival Film “Whiplash”
Best Comedy: “Guardians of the Galaxy”
Best Documentary: “Citizenfour”
Best Non-English Language Film: “Force Majeure”
Best Scene (favorite movie scene or sequence): “X-Men: Days of Future Past” – Quicksilver Escape from the Pentagon

boyhood 33

(thanks to Joe Shearer for the catch)

By Christopher Lloyd :: Dec 15, 2014 No Comments »

BOYHOOD INSIDE

The Indiana Film Journalists Association, an organization of writers dedicated to promoting quality film criticism in the Hoosier State, is proud to announce its annual film awards for 2014.

“Boyhood” won top honors, taking the prize for Best Film and earning a total of three awards. Richard Linklater won in the Best Director category, and the film also took the Original Vision award, which recognizes a film that is especially innovative or groundbreaking.

“Whiplash,” which was the runner-up for Best Film, won two awards: Damien Chazelle’s script in the Best Adapted Screenplay race, and J.K. Simmons for Best Supporting Actor.

“The Grand Budapest Hotel” also won two awards: Ralph Fiennes was named Best Actor, and Wes Anderson earned the Best Original Screenplay prize.

Besides the winner and runner-up for Best Film, eight other movies were named Finalists in that category, cumulatively representing Indiana film critics’ picks for the 10 best movies of 2014. (See full list below.)

Reese Witherspoon took Best Actress honors for “Wild,” while Jessica Chastain took Best Supporting Actress for “A Most Violent Year.”

In the inaugural vote for the newest category, Best Vocal/Motion Capture Performance, Andy Serkis won for his work on “The Dawn of the Planet of the Apes.” The IFJA is the only critics group in the U.S. to give out an award for nonrepresentational acting.

“The LEGO Movie” won Best Animated Feature, “Two Days, One Night” took the prize for Best Foreign Language Film and “Life Itself” took Best Documentary.

The Hoosier Award, which recognizes a significant cinematic contribution by a person or persons with roots in Indiana, or a film that depicts Hoosier State locales and stories, went to film historian and preservationist Eric Grayson.

IFJA members issued this statement with regard to the Hoosier Award: “For more than a decade, Grayson has worked tirelessly to collect, restore and exhibit movies on celluloid film, often for little to no pay or recognition. We commend his efforts to preserve movies in their original state and show them to people who share his passion for cinema. Countless films would have been lost to the ages were it not for his efforts.”

The following is a complete list of honored films:

Best Film

Winner: “Boyhood”

Runner-up: “Whiplash”

Other Finalists (listed alphabetically):

“Dawn of the Planet of the Apes”

“The Grand Budapest Hotel”

“Guardians of the Galaxy”

“The Imitation Game”

“Life Itself”

“Locke”

“A Most Violent Year”

“St. Vincent”

Best Animated Feature

Winner: “The LEGO Movie”

Runner-Up: “The Boxtrolls ”

Best Foreign Language Film

Winner: “Two Days, One Night”

Runner-Up: “Ida”

Best Documentary

Winner: “Life Itself”

Runner-Up: “An Honest Liar”

Best Original Screenplay

Winner: Wes Anderson, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

Runner-up: Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”

Best Adapted Screenplay

Winner: Damien Chazelle, “Whiplash”

Runner-up: Graham Moore, “The Imitation Game”

Best Director

Winner: Richard Linklater, “Boyhood”

Runner-up: Damien Chazelle, “Whiplash”

Best Actress

Winner: Reese Witherspoon, “Wild”

Runner-up: Rosamund Pike, “Gone Girl”

Best Supporting Actress

Winner: Jessica Chastain “A Most Violent Year”

Runner-up: Melissa McCarthy, “St. Vincent”

Best Actor

Winner: Ralph Fiennes, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

Runner-up: Tom Hardy, “Locke”

Best Supporting Actor

Winner: J.K. Simmons, “Whiplash”

Runner-up: Ethan Hawke, “Boyhood”

Best Musical Score

Winner: Mica Levi, “Under the Skin”

Runner-up: Alexandre Desplat, “The Grand Budapest Hotel”

Original Vision Award

Winner: “Boyhood”

Runner-up: “Under the Skin”

The Hoosier Award

Winner: Eric Grayson, film historian and preservationist

(As a special award, no runner-up is declared in this category.)

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