ORIGINAL SCORE

Four time Oscar nominee and French film composer Alexandre Desplat isn’t one to take it easy and have some rest. Some of his more masterful compositions reside in films such as The Tree Of Life, The Fantastic Mr Fox and The Queen. In 2012, Desplat is on a roll, composing for close to seven feature films (same number of scores he composed in 2011). Contenders such as Argo, Moonrise Kingdom, Rise Of The Guardians, Rust & Bone and Zero Dark Thirty will be stamped by Desplat’s incredibly nuanced and visionary musical head.

What would Mr.Desplat be doing if he hadn’t made it big in Hollywood you ask? “I’d look at the blue sky, eat cheese, tomatoes and figs, and at the end of the day, walk down for a swim in the sea. And then, I’d sleep,” the composer was quoted as saying to the Wall Street Journal. Not far off to the sombre,sometimes melancholic mood Desplat creates with his compositions. Although as we speak his schedule will be much lighter in 2013 as he is due to compose only one film so far (Zulu).
Continue reading…

SoundWorks Collection: The Sound and Music of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo from Michael Coleman on Vimeo.

Soundworks Collection talks with Composers Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross, Sound Re-recording Mixer Michael Semanick, and Re-recording Mixer, Sound Designer, and Supervising Sound Editor Ren Klyce.

Dragon Tattoo is a film you experience with your senses, like many of the best films this year – Tree of Life, Hugo, Drive, The Artist – music and sound is as much a part of it as the writing. This is especially true of the Reznor/Ross – Fincher collaboration. It isn’t really your run-of-the-mill composing that goes on when they work together – it is more integral, more organic. The music is really sewn into the flesh of the thing. I think that’s why it stands out from other film scores, to me anyway. When I listen to either The Social Network or the Girl with the Dragon Tattoo’s score I am really taken to another place. I don’t know how they do it but the hypnotic power of both scores is undeniable. They work well on their own as pieces of music but they also drive the films they score the way blood pumps the arteries. It’s an exceptional collaboration.

“The Adjustment Bureau,” Thomas Newman, composer
“The Adventures of Tintin,” John Williams, composer
“African Cats,” Nicholas Hooper, composer
“Albert Nobbs,” Brian Byrne, composer
“Alvin and the Chipmunks: Chipwrecked,” Mark Mothersbaugh, composer
“Anonymous,” Thomas Wander and Harald Kloser, composers
“Another Earth,” Phil Mossman and Will Bates, composers
“Answers to Nothing,” Craig Richey, composer
“Arthur Christmas,” Harry Gregson-Williams, composer
“The Artist,” Ludovic Bource, composer

Continue reading…

It is a haunting and beautiful score, no two ways about it, and now thanks to reader David Cappi, you can listen to it online over at the WB FYC site for the film.  Have a listen.

Just a brief supplement to Sasha’s post about Reznor & Ross below. Different enough to merit a second headline. First, you can download 6 free tracks from the Dragon Tattoo soundtrack at this link. On that page you’ll also find a portal for ordering the full album in a variety of formats, both digital and disc. (thanks to glimmer for the link) Next, you can read a great conversation with Trent Reznor and Karen 0 discussing their collaboration on Immigrant Song.

Heavy electronic beats, distortion and a wailing cry from Karen gives it a futuristic edge.

“When I went into the studio to record the song I was feeling pretty angsty,” says Karen. “And I poured all my torment into the track as Trent’s section was pretty rad.

“It’s ballsy with the primal scream in there which was really fun and liberating to do.”

You might as well know now that I think what they’re going to be putting out there is unlike anything I’ve ever seen a composer do with a film score, at least in my lifetime.  I really do think that Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross’ score for The Social Network stands on its own as a brilliant album.  The music tells a story.  With Dragon Tattoo it’s at a whole different level.  The whole thing is mind-boggling.  They really have, I think, reinvented the wheel in a way — similar to what Peter Gabriel did with Passion of the Christ and Bob Dylan with Pat Garrett and Billy the Kid.  People who love movie scores tend to fall into two categories -the traditionalists, who like film composers who stick to the rules of the medium.  And then those who prefer the composers who work outside the confines of tradition. If you’re in the latter group, you are in for a major treat.  The remix of Led Zeppelin’s Immigrant Song is making the rounds – you can watch it with visuals at Pitch Fork Media’s website. Visuals created by David Fincher! Here it is without.

In the meantime, get your hands on the DELUXE soundtrack asap.

Play

Paramount has made available 20 tracks from Howard Shore’s score for Hugo.  Links after the cut.

Continue reading…

Play

Paramount has made available 20 tracks from Howard Shore’s score for Hugo.  Links after the cut.

Continue reading…

16 tracks from War Horse, after the cut. (Thanks to Tero Heikkinen)

Continue reading…

16 tracks from War Horse, after the cut. (Thanks to Tero Heikkinen)

Continue reading…

No release date or track list yet. Just the cover art. (Playlist)

Continue reading…

AFI’s Master Class – The Art of Collaboration

Turner Classic Movies and the American Film Institute (AFI) are teaming up for an extraordinary series of quarterly specials exploring some of the greatest artistic collaborations in film today. TCM Presents: AFI’s Master Class – The Art of Collaboration will launch Tuesday, Nov. 15, with an in-depth, one-hour special focusing on the 40-year collaboration between filmmaker Steven Spielberg and composer John Williams. Upcoming specials in the series will be announced later.

“It is understood that film is a collaborative art, but the enormously successful artists featured in these specials have taken collaboration to its highest level,” said Michael Wright, executive vice president, head of programming for TCM, TNT and TBS. “We are enormously proud to be working with the American Film Institute on this vital project, which will capture the vision and processes of artists whose collaborations have literally changed how movies are made.”

Continue reading…

AFI’s Master Class – The Art of Collaboration

Turner Classic Movies and the American Film Institute (AFI) are teaming up for an extraordinary series of quarterly specials exploring some of the greatest artistic collaborations in film today. TCM Presents: AFI’s Master Class – The Art of Collaboration will launch Tuesday, Nov. 15, with an in-depth, one-hour special focusing on the 40-year collaboration between filmmaker Steven Spielberg and composer John Williams. Upcoming specials in the series will be announced later.

“It is understood that film is a collaborative art, but the enormously successful artists featured in these specials have taken collaboration to its highest level,” said Michael Wright, executive vice president, head of programming for TCM, TNT and TBS. “We are enormously proud to be working with the American Film Institute on this vital project, which will capture the vision and processes of artists whose collaborations have literally changed how movies are made.”

Continue reading…

Had been holding off posting these sample fragments in hopes that maybe more would become available. But it looks like the 3 complete tracks after the cut are all we’re getting for now.

Continue reading…

(Thanks to Tero!)

Continue reading…

One of the most surprising (and, thus, thrilling) things about Drive is the way the score plinks keys in our brains that open aural pathways to strains both familiar and strange in our movie music memory. When I ran across this incredibly in-depth interview with writer-producer-musician Johnny Jewel in Box Office Magazine I pounced on it primarily because I hoped to find some reference to a chime-like synthesizer theme in once scene that brought back a tingly rush of association with a climatic epiphany in 1983’s Risky Business. (The scene in Drive I mean is when Ryan Gosling’s ‘Driver’ sees his neighbor (Carey Mulligan) and her son in a grocery store aisle they first day they connect. If you see it again — or for the first time — watch for that grocery scene and listen to the music when he lays eyes on her. See if you don’t agree it’s an homage to Tangerine Dream as Tom Cruise launching into full-throttle nighttime pursuit of his dark obsession in Risky Business).

Well, the few seconds of synth I hoped Johnny Jewel might talk about aren’t mentioned in this interview at all. But no matter. There’s an enormous wealth of fascinating material here. It’s a rare treat to see musical choices so precisely explained. As many have noted, the decisions Jewel and Refn made for the Drive soundtrack sometimes feel so wacky it made me wonder if it wasn’t intended to be borderline kitsch. (Nothing wrong with that, as far as I’m concerned.) It felt to me like some of the campy choices David Lynch makes for the incidental music he throws into his films to bend scenes into unexpectedly ironic configurations.

I want to quote a dozen things from this interview with Johnny Jewel, but I’ll only pick up on one or two points in hopes that it’ll whet your appetite to go read the entire piece.

Continue reading…

Listen to tracks from Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy. Score composed by Alberto Iglesias.

(via filmology)

The International Film Music Critics Association announces the winners of its seventh annual awards for excellence in musical scoring in 2010

Film Score of the Year: John Powell, HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON
Best Score for an Animated Film: John Powell, HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON
Best Score for a Drama Film: Alexandre Desplat, THE KING’S SPEECH
Best Score for an Action/Adventure/Thriller Film: Alexandre Desplat, THE GHOST WRITER
Composer of the Year: Alexandre Desplat
Best Score for a Comedy Film: Pinar Toprak, THE LIGHTKEEPERS.
Best Score to a Fantasy/Science Fiction/Horror Film: Daft Punk, TRON: LEGACY
Best Score for a Documentary Film: Bruno Coulais, OCÉANS
Best Individual Composition: Danny Elfman, “Alice Theme” from ALICE IN WONDERLAND
Breakout Composer of the Year: Nuno Malo, AMÁLIA

2010 Film Categories

FILM SCORE OF THE YEAR

• THE GHOST WRITER, music by Alexandre Desplat
• HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON, music by John Powell
• INCEPTION, music by Hans Zimmer
• THE KING’S SPEECH, music by Alexandre Desplat
• TRON: LEGACY, music by Daft Punk

Continue reading…

Sign In

Register

Reset Your Password

Email Newsletter