Viggo Mortensen

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The pic will screen in Venice and Toronto. From The Playlist: Mortensen’s latest is “Far from Men,” an adaption from a short story by Albert Camus (“L’Hôte” from the book “L’Exil et le Royaume”). In this gritty tale of survival, ...

The Playlist points us to this first pic from the directorial debut of Drive screenwriter Hossein Amini. The film is based on a Patricia Highsmith novel about a con man (Mortensen) and his wife who hook up an American tutor (Oscar ...

In David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method Viggo Mortensen is nearly unrecognizable. Few actors today really dive into the research the way he does and it shows in each new incarnation Mortensen delivers. He is one of the most unpredictable actors ...

In a week of cinematic riches raining down from all directions, it’s tough to grab a turn at the mic for a moment. A.O. Scott turns our attention to A Dangerous Method by setting it on the pedestal of NYT’s ...

When Michael Fassbender, Viggo Mortensen, and David Cronenberg appear in a photo together I feel it is my duty to show it you, dear readers.  They are in London promoting Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method, an intriguing film about Freud, Jung ...

Like many of the great David Cronenberg’s films, A Dangerous Method keeps you at an arm’s length as it dives into the world of the perverse and the key forces that shaped how we think about our own subconscious, our ...

Christopher Hampton won an Oscar for the screenplay for Dangerous Liasons and was nominated for his adaptation of Atonement. A Dangerous Method, David Cronenberg’s film version of Hampton’s stage play The Talking Cure takes place in the first decade of ...

Reader Jon tips us off to the news that Viggo Mortensen has replaced Christoph Waltz in Cronenberg’s new film, The Talking Cure, based on the Christopher Hampton play. The Dark Horizons, via DHD, says that Mortensen will play Sigmund Freud, ...

Gold Derby posts this Oliver Stone mention for the John Hillcoat epic: Oliver Stone, who directed a previous Oscar best picture (“Platoon”), is cheering on “The Road” as it jockeys for a spot in the top 10 of the current ...

And so it is in the 11th hour that I’ve finally seen John Hillcoat’s The Road. Of all of the films I’ve seen this year, this is the only film that will stay with me throughout my entire life, probably, ...

(click to enlarge) Maybe not as artfully stark as the pair of monochrome teasers we saw in September, and there’s probably more color popping in these two posters than there is in the entire metallic-palette movie. But this isn’t the ...

We’ll post the complete version of Viggo Mortensen’s Late Show appearance as soon as we find a better clip.

Remarkably faithful to the novel, down to the most desolate detail. What impresses me most about the production design is the endless ashen sensation of terrible majesty. It’s as if the whole world has become the ruins of the Acropolis ...

I first read The Road two weeks after it was published, in 2006. Just finished re-reading it tonight and this time was able to hear the austere dialogue spoken in my ear by Viggo Mortensen, Kodi Smit-McPhee, Robert Duvall, Garret ...

Word is coming from various outlets, including Screendaily, and Empire. Guy Lodge at InContention also has a review up.¬† It’s time to take a quick look at how Best Actor is shaping up so far. Leaving out those who have ...

(click to enlarge) As gracefully framed in their own way as the equally potent poster for The White Ribbon. UPDATE: Now a matching set, with the flipside of the cataclysm coin. “Call it, friendo.”

The Time Online says, “the rumourmongers were wrong ‚Äî Hillcoat‚Äôs vision is forthright and brutal.” Post-apocalyptic cinema ‚Äî from Mad Max to Twelve Monkeys to Children of Men ‚Äî has proved time and again that there is nothing that production ...

Those who know the book will see things in this trailer that Cormac McCarthy never explicitly described. It’s my understanding, from the feature article in Esquire we posted a few days ago, that the movie doesn’t show them either. So ...

Thanks to good buddy Craig Kennedy at Living in Cinema for letting us know Esquire has seen The Road, and calls it “the Most Important Movie of the Year.” The feature article runs 3300 words — plenty to feed those ...

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