Tears in Telluride for 127 Hours

Tears in Telluride for 127 Hours

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Twitter has been abuzz for a while now with breathless tweets about Danny Boyle’s 127 Hours — only one was slightly disappointed. The 24 Frames blog at the LA Times says many tears were shed: In ‚Äú127 Hours,‚Äù Boyle‚Äôs cameras (he used two cinematographers, Anthony Dod Mantle and Enrique Chediak) never stop moving. They soar over the desolate Utah canyons where Ralston was stuck for all those hours. They swim…


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Mostly Positive Reactions from Telluride for Never Let Me Go

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Variety‘s Peter Debruge frames his extended forecast in terms of temperamental climate conditions in the blogosphere: “Never Let Me Go is that rare find, a fragile little four-leaf clover of a movie that’s emotionally devastating, yet all too easily trampled by cynics.” Romanek, best known for his visionary musicvideo work, tries to hold back anything that might brand the film as overly personal, and yet, as in “One Hour Photo,”…


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The Year of the Doc Continues with Tabloid

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While it’s always unwise to group together the opinions of a few who were able to go to Telluride (if one could afford it, that is) because at some point the festival circuit begins to look like one big focus group or test screening. If you don’t trust focus groups or test screenings, you can’t really trust any old person who wanders into a film festival and shares their opinion….


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Eric Bialas in Telluride reviews Never Let Me Go

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[NOTE: Never Let Me Go is built around a premise that reveals itself gradually with unsettling banality. The circumstances are made clear early on, but if you'd rather discover the situation unprepared then you'll want to skip reading about the details that any review will have trouble avoiding. This one included.] Never Let Me Go is a dystopian film in England that is based on the famous book with the…


Amigo

John Sayles’ Amigo, trailer

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An American invasion of a foreign country. A battle for hearts and minds. A pacification programme to quell an insurgency. Guerrilla warfare. Firefights. Sound familiar? Well, yes and no. √úber-indie American filmmaker John Sayles winds the clock back to 1900 and the US occupation of the Philippines in his brave new film, Amigo. Sayles finds many parallels behind this little-remembered event in history and current events in Iraq and Afghanistan….


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Top 25 Opening Scenes

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Another good post from The Film Stage, this time highlighting a possible list of 25 of the most memorable film openings. You must go and read the post (with links!) but here are the scenes. 25. Inglourious Basterds 24. Vertigo 23. Antichrist 22. La Dolce Vita


Tree of Life: Early Reaction

Tree of Life: Early Reaction

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Most of you are waiting to hear anything about Tree of Life so this post counts, in some strange way, as actual news. The Film Stage alerted us to this early reaction of the film by a member of Home Theater Forum: Saw TREE OF LIFE the other night at work and it really is amazing. Hypnotic, more like. I won‚Äôt give anything about it away here, but yes it…


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Variety’s take on Somewhere

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Don’t want to seem to be obsessing but as these reviews trickle the reactions are all over the map, so here’s another perspective from Variety: Sofia Coppola’s “Somewhere” is a quiet heartbreaker. Trading “Lost in Translation’s” Tokyo hotel for Beverly Hills’ Chateau Marmont, the ever-perceptive writer-director further hones her gifts for ruefully funny observation and understated melancholy with this low-key portrait of a burned-out screen actor. Steeped in morning-after regret…


Slightly Less Enthusiastic for Somewhere Says The Guardian

Slightly Less Enthusiastic for Somewhere Says The Guardian

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The movie is, arguably, far truer to life than a more obviously scripted account, and there are some nice touches ‚Äì for his “old man” makeup, Johnny has to endure a plaster mould slathered all over his head with breathing holes left for his nostrils. Like some monster or Egyptian mummy, we see him stifling with loneliness. Cocooned in celebrity, he can make contact with no one. Coppola is arguably…


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The Way Back finds distribution with Newmarket

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In advance of its Telluride premiere, Peter Weir’s epic trek The Way Back has already found a distributor. Deadline says the acquisition is a synergistic deal for Newmarket since Newmarket’s parent company Exclusive Media Group provided financing for the film’s production. Newmarket previously handled US distribution for Whale Rider, Monster, The Passion of the Christ, Downfall, and The Prestige, so they have experience shepherding provocative material with sophisticated finesse.

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The Toronto Film Fest unfurls September 4th through the 14th. New York kind of pulled an announcement coup, being the first major North American...

Picture of the Day

Trailers

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Here’s a vintage 1980s thriller nobody remembers because it won’t open till next month. Based on an ’80s espionage novel. Directed by Roger Donaldson...